lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2000]   [Nov]   [14]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: Advanced Linux Kernel/Enterprise Linux Kernel
Josue Emmanuel Amaro <Josue.Amaro@oracle.com>:
> This subject came up in the Generalized Kernel Hooks Interface thread, since it
> is an area of interest to me I wanted to continue that conversation.
>
> While I do not think it would be productive to enter a discussion whether there
> is a need to fork the kernel to add features that would be beneficial to
> mission/business critical applications, I am curious as to what are the features
> that people consider important to have. By mission critical I mean systems that
> if not functional bring a business to a halt, while by business critical I mean
> systems that affect a division of a business.
>
> Another problem is how people define Enterprise Systems. Many base it on the
> definitions that go back to S390 systems, others in the context of the 24/7
> nature of the internet. That would also be a healthy discussion to have.
>
> At Oracle we are primarily interested on I/O subsystem features and memory
> management. (For anyone that knows anything about Oracle this should not come
> as a surprise, although I am pretty sure that any database vendor/developer
> would be interested on those features as well.)

I reformatted/phrased your questions above to allow for separate answers:

Q1. How do you define Enterprise Systems? Many base it on the definitions that
go back to S390 systems, others in the context of the 24/7 nature of the
internet.

1. The system should be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a
year :-), with time off for scheduled down time for maintenance and
upgrades.

2. It should be possible to take down a node of a cluster without affecting
the effectiveness of the other nodes. There is an expeced higher load on
the remaining nodes during the time the node is missing.
3. It should be possible to add nodes to a cluster without affecting the
effectiveness of the other nodes.

4. Unauthorized access to, modification to, or damage to the effectiveness of
the system should be possible (the ideal...). All security related events
should be audited and logged.

Q2. I am curious as to what are the features that people consider important to
have. By mission critical I mean systems that if not functional bring a
business to a halt, while by business critical I mean systems that affect
a division of a business.

1. Secure - Multi-level security (with compartmentalization) is needed to
be able to detect unauthorized attempts to modify the system. There should
be no all powerfull user. System updates should require three different
authorizations (security, administrator, and auditor) to take effect when
the system is on-line. All bets are off, of course, if the system is taken
offline for such modifications - at that point, the administrator would
be able to make any changes. The security administrator should validate
the system in some manner. The system should not be able to be brought
online without being validated.

IPSec to provide controled encryption between hosts. Inclusion of CIPSO
style extensions to allow for labeled network support. Virtical integration
to include user identification tags as well. I would like to be able to
identify the remote user, with confidence in that identity established
by the confidence in the host, which is in turn established by IPSec.

I (meaning me) would like the ability to audit every system call. (yes,
this is horrendous, if everything is logged, but I want to be able to
choose how much is logged at the source of the data, rather than at
the destination. That would reduce the total data flood to what is
manageable or desired.

I realize that this is extreme - but in some environments this degree of
control is necessary. It should be possible to downgrade this level of
control to the point that is required for other environments.

2. Allow for full accounting of user resources - memory, cpu, disk, IO.

3. It should not be possible for a user to exceed the resource quotas
established for the user. This control should be flexible enough to allow
for exceeding some quotas if additional resources are available, but
unused. (I'm considering memory resources and CPU time here. The user
should be able to exceed memory quota, but with the understanding that
the users processes will be trimmed down to the users quota limit if
needed for other users.

4. Batch jobs, using a more common definition of batch than that used by
the "batch" utility - job queues, with batch controled limits, job
checkpointing/restart, resource allocation controls... Batch jobs
should be able to migrate to other nodes/systems (as long as all other
required resources are available ... This is HARD to do :-).

5. Allow for multiple scheduling types, preferably concurrently, but changable
at runtime. Some real time, mostly batch and interactive.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jesse I Pollard, II
Email: pollard@navo.hpc.mil

Any opinions expressed are solely my own.
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-03-22 12:45    [W:0.182 / U:4.580 seconds]
©2003-2017 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site