lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2013]   [Jul]   [31]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 0/18] Basic scheduler support for automatic NUMA balancing V5
On Wed, Jul 31, 2013 at 12:48:14PM +0200, Peter Zijlstra wrote:
> On Wed, Jul 31, 2013 at 11:30:52AM +0100, Mel Gorman wrote:
> > I'm not sure I understand your point. The scan rate is decreased again if
> > the page is found to be properly placed in the future. It's in the next
> > hunk you modify although the periodically reset comment is now out of date.
>
> Yeah its because of the next hunk. I figured that if we don't lower it,
> we shouldn't raise it either.
>

hmm, I'm going to punt that to a TODO item and think about it some more
with a fresh head.

> > > @@ -1167,10 +1171,20 @@ void task_numa_fault(int last_nidpid, in
> > > /*
> > > * If pages are properly placed (did not migrate) then scan slower.
> > > * This is reset periodically in case of phase changes
> > > - */
> > > - if (!migrated)
> > > + *
> > > + * APZ: it seems to me that one can get a ton of !migrated faults;
> > > + * consider the scenario where two threads fight over a shared memory
> > > + * segment. We'll win half the faults, half of that will be local, half
> > > + * of that will be remote. This means we'll see 1/4-th of the total
> > > + * memory being !migrated. Using a fixed increment will completely
> > > + * flatten the scan speed for a sufficiently large workload. Another
> > > + * scenario is due to that migration rate limit.
> > > + *
> > > + if (!migrated) {
> > > p->numa_scan_period = min(p->numa_scan_period_max,
> > > p->numa_scan_period + jiffies_to_msecs(10));
> > > + }
> > > + */
> >
> > FWIW, I'm also not happy with how the scan rate is reduced but did not
> > come up with a better alternative that was not fragile or depended on
> > gathering too much state. Granted, I also have not been treating it as a
> > high priority problem.
>
> Right, so what Ingo did is have the scan rate depend on the convergence.
> What exactly did you dislike about that?
>

It depended entirely on properly detecting if we are converged or not. As
things like false share detection within THP is still not there I was
worried that it was too easy to make the wrong decision here and keep it
pinned at the maximum scan rate.

> We could define the convergence as all the faults inside the interleave
> mask vs the total faults, and then run at: min + (1 - c)*(max-min).
>

And when we have such things properly in place then I think we can kick
away the current crutch.

> > > +#if 0
> > > /*
> > > * We do not care about task placement until a task runs on a node
> > > * other than the first one used by the address space. This is
> > > * largely because migrations are driven by what CPU the task
> > > * is running on. If it's never scheduled on another node, it'll
> > > * not migrate so why bother trapping the fault.
> > > + *
> > > + * APZ: seems like a bad idea for pure shared memory workloads.
> > > */
> > > if (mm->first_nid == NUMA_PTE_SCAN_INIT)
> > > mm->first_nid = numa_node_id();
> >
> > At some point in the past scan starts were based on waiting a fixed interval
> > but that seemed like a hack designed to get around hurting kernel compile
> > benchmarks. I'll give it more thought and see can I think of a better
> > alternative that is based on an event but not this event.
>
> Ah, well the reasoning on that was that all this NUMA business is
> 'expensive' so we'd better only bother with tasks that persist long
> enough for it to pay off.
>

Which is fair enough but tasks that lasted *just* longer than the interval
still got punished. Processes running with a slightly slower CPU gets
hurts meaning that it would be a difficult bug report to digest.

> In that regard it makes perfect sense to wait a fixed amount of runtime
> before we start scanning.
>
> So it was not a pure hack to make kbuild work again.. that is did was
> good though.
>

Maybe we should reintroduce the delay then but I really would prefer that
it was triggered on some sort of event.

> > > @@ -1254,9 +1272,14 @@ void task_numa_work(struct callback_head
> > > * Do not set pte_numa if the current running node is rate-limited.
> > > * This loses statistics on the fault but if we are unwilling to
> > > * migrate to this node, it is less likely we can do useful work
> > > - */
> > > + *
> > > + * APZ: seems like a bad idea; even if this node can't migrate anymore
> > > + * other nodes might and we want up-to-date information to do balance
> > > + * decisions.
> > > + *
> > > if (migrate_ratelimited(numa_node_id()))
> > > return;
> > > + */
> > >
> >
> > Ingo also disliked this but I wanted to avoid a situation where the
> > workload suffered because of a corner case where the interconnect was
> > filled with migration traffic.
>
> Right, but you already rate limit the actual migrations, this should
> leave enough bandwidth to allow the non-migrating scanning.
>
> I think its important we keep up-to-date information if we're going to
> do placement based on it.
>

Ok, you convinced me. I slapped a changelog on it that is a cut&paste job
and moved it earlier in the series.

> On that rate-limit, this looks to be a hard-coded number unrelated to
> the actual hardware.

Guesstimate.

> I think we should at the very least make it a
> configurable number and preferably scale the number with the SLIT info.
> Or alternatively actually measure the node to node bandwidth.
>

Ideally we should just kick it away because scan rate limiting works
properly. Lets not make it a tunable just yet so we can avoid having to
deprecate it later.

--
Mel Gorman
SUSE Labs


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2013-07-31 19:01    [W:0.099 / U:0.676 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site