lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2021]   [Jun]   [11]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [PATCH Part1 RFC v3 21/22] x86/sev: Register SNP guest request platform device
From
Date
On 6/9/21 2:24 PM, Dr. David Alan Gilbert wrote:
> * Brijesh Singh (brijesh.singh@amd.com) wrote:
>> Version 2 of GHCB specification provides NAEs that can be used by the SNP
>> guest to communicate with the PSP without risk from a malicious hypervisor
>> who wishes to read, alter, drop or replay the messages sent.
>>
>> The hypervisor uses the SNP_GUEST_REQUEST command interface provided by
>> the SEV-SNP firmware to forward the guest messages to the PSP.
>>
>> In order to communicate with the PSP, the guest need to locate the secrets
>> page inserted by the hypervisor during the SEV-SNP guest launch. The
>> secrets page contains the communication keys used to send and receive the
>> encrypted messages between the guest and the PSP.
>>
>> The secrets page is located either through the setup_data cc_blob_address
>> or EFI configuration table.
>>
>> Create a platform device that the SNP guest driver can bind to get the
>> platform resources. The SNP guest driver can provide userspace interface
>> to get the attestation report, key derivation etc.
>>
>> The helper snp_issue_guest_request() will be used by the drivers to
>> send the guest message request to the hypervisor. The guest message header
>> contains a message count. The message count is used in the IV. The
>> firmware increments the message count by 1, and expects that next message
>> will be using the incremented count.
>>
>> The helper snp_msg_seqno() will be used by driver to get and message
>> sequence counter, and it will be automatically incremented by the
>> snp_issue_guest_request(). The incremented value is be saved in the
>> secrets page so that the kexec'ed kernel knows from where to begin.
>>
>> See SEV-SNP and GHCB spec for more details.
>>
>> Signed-off-by: Brijesh Singh <brijesh.singh@amd.com>
>> ---
>> arch/x86/include/asm/sev.h | 12 +++
>> arch/x86/include/uapi/asm/svm.h | 2 +
>> arch/x86/kernel/sev.c | 176 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
>> arch/x86/platform/efi/efi.c | 2 +
>> include/linux/efi.h | 1 +
>> include/linux/sev-guest.h | 76 ++++++++++++++
>> 6 files changed, 269 insertions(+)
>> create mode 100644 include/linux/sev-guest.h
>>

>> +u64 snp_msg_seqno(void)
>> +{
>> + struct snp_secrets_page_layout *layout;
>> + u64 count;
>> +
>> + layout = snp_map_secrets_page();
>> + if (layout == NULL)
>> + return 0;
>> +
>> + /* Read the current message sequence counter from secrets pages */
>> + count = readl(&layout->os_area.msg_seqno_0);
>
> Why is this seqno_0 - is that because it's the count of talking to the
> PSP?

Yes, the sequence number is an ever increasing value that is used in
communicating with the PSP. The PSP maintains the next expected sequence
number and will reject messages which have a sequence number that is not
in sync with the PSP. The 0 refers to the VMPL level. Each VMPL level has
its own sequence number.

>
>> + iounmap(layout);
>> +
>> + /*
>> + * The message sequence counter for the SNP guest request is a 64-bit value
>> + * but the version 2 of GHCB specification defines the 32-bit storage for the
>> + * it.
>> + */
>> + if ((count + 1) >= INT_MAX)
>> + return 0;
>
> Is that UINT_MAX?
>
>> +
>> + return count + 1;
>> +}
>> +EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(snp_msg_seqno);
>> +
>> +static void snp_gen_msg_seqno(void)
>> +{
>> + struct snp_secrets_page_layout *layout;
>> + u64 count;
>> +
>> + layout = snp_map_secrets_page();
>> + if (layout == NULL)
>> + return;
>> +
>> + /* Increment the sequence counter by 2 and save in secrets page. */
>> + count = readl(&layout->os_area.msg_seqno_0);
>> + count += 2;
>
> Why 2 not 1 ?

The return message by the PSP also increments the sequence number, hence
the increment by 2 instead of 1 for the next message to be submitted.

I'll let Brijesh address the other questions.

Thanks,
Tom

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2021-06-11 15:18    [W:0.113 / U:1.028 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site