lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Jul]   [30]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [Linux-kernel-mentees] [PATCH v2] block/floppy: Prevent kernel-infoleak in raw_cmd_copyout()
On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 10:11:07AM +0200, Arnd Bergmann wrote:
> > On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 3:22 PM Denis Efremov <efremov@linux.com> wrote:
>
> > And checked for leaks on x86_64 with the script test.sh
> > $ cat test.sh
> > #!/bin/bash
> >
> > for i in 4.8 5 6 7 8 9 10
> > do
> > ./run_container.sh gcc-$i $(pwd)/src $(pwd)/out bash -c 'gcc test.c; ./a.out'
> > ./run_container.sh gcc-$i $(pwd)/src $(pwd)/out bash -c 'gcc -O2 test.c; ./a.out'
> > ./run_container.sh gcc-$i $(pwd)/src $(pwd)/out bash -c 'gcc -O3 test.c; ./a.out'
> > done
> >
> > No leaks reported. Is it really possible this this kind of init, i.e. cmd = *ptr?
>
> The problem is that the behavior is dependent not just on the compiler
> version but
> also optimization flags, target architecture and specific structure
> layouts. Most
> of the time, both gcc and clang will initialize the whole structure
> rather than just
> the individual members, but you still can't be sure that this is true
> for all configurations
> that this code runs on, except by using CONFIG_GCC_PLUGIN_STRUCTLEAK.
>
> Kees pointed me to the lib/test_stackinit.c file in the kernel in which he has
> collected a number of combinations that are known to trigger the problem.
>
> What I see there though are only cases of struct initializers like
>
> struct test_big_hole var = { .one = arg->one, .two=arg->two, .three
> = arg->three, .four = arg->four };

test_stackinit.c intended to use six cases (where "full" is in the sense
of "all members are named", this is intentionally testing the behavior
of padding hole initialization):

full static initialization:

= { .one = 0,
.two = 0,
.three = 0,
.four = 0,
};

partial static init:

= { .two = 0, };

full dynamic init:

= { .one = arg->one,
.two = arg->two,
.three = arg->three,
.four = arg->four,
};

partial dynamic init:

= { .two = arg->two, };

full runtime init:

var.one = 0;
var.two = 0;
var.three = 0;
memset(&var.four, 0, sizeof(var.four));

partial runtime init:

var.two = 0;

(It seems in refactoring I botched the "full static initialization"
case, which I'll go fix separately.)

> but not the syntax used in the floppy driver:
>
> struct test_big_hole var = *arg;

So this one is a "whole structure copy" which I didn't have any tests
for, since I'd (perhaps inappropriately) assumed would be accomplished
with memcpy() internally, which means the incoming "*arg"'s padding holes
would be copied as-is. If the compiler is actually doing per-member copies
and leaving holes in "var" untouched, that's unexpected, so clearly that
needs to be added to test_stackinit.c! :)

> or the a constructor like
>
> struct test_big_hole var;
> var = (struct test_big_hole){ .one = arg->one, .two=arg->two, .three
> = arg->three, .four = arg->four };
>
> Kees, do you know whether those two would behave differently?
> Would it make sense to also check for those, or am I perhaps
> misreading your code and it already gets checked?

I *think* the above constructor would be covered under "full runtime
init", but it does also seem likely it would be handled similarly to
the "whole structure copy" in the previous example. I will go add more
tests...

--
Kees Cook

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-07-30 20:11    [W:0.062 / U:4.384 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site