lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Jul]   [10]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH 1/2] serial: qcom_geni_serial: Make kgdb work even if UART isn't console
Hi,

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 12:03 PM Evan Green <evgreen@chromium.org> wrote:
>
> On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 11:19 AM Doug Anderson <dianders@chromium.org> wrote:
> >
> > Hi,
> >
> > On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 10:39 AM Evan Green <evgreen@chromium.org> wrote:
> > >
> > > On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 1:01 PM Douglas Anderson <dianders@chromium.org> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > The geni serial driver had the rather sketchy hack in it where it
> > > > would adjust the number of bytes per RX FIFO word from 4 down to 1 if
> > > > it detected that CONFIG_CONSOLE_POLL was enabled (for kgdb) and this
> > > > was a console port (defined by the kernel directing output to this
> > > > port via the "console=" command line argument).
> > > >
> > > > The problem with that sketchy hack is that it's possible to run kgdb
> > > > over a serial port even if it isn't used for console.
> > > >
> > > > Let's avoid the hack by simply handling the 4-bytes-per-FIFO word case
> > > > for kdb. We'll have to have a (very small) cache but that should be
> > > > fine.
> > > >
> > > > A nice side effect of this patch is that an agetty (or similar)
> > > > running on this port is less likely to drop characters. We'll
> > > > have roughly 4 times the RX FIFO depth than we used to now.
> > > >
> > > > NOTE: the character cache here isn't shared between the polling API
> > > > and the non-polling API. That means that, technically, the polling
> > > > API could eat a few extra bytes. This doesn't seem to pose a huge
> > > > problem in reality because we'll only get several characters per FIFO
> > > > word if those characters are all received at nearly the same time and
> > > > we don't really expect non-kgdb characters to be sent to the same port
> > > > as kgdb at the exact same time we're exiting kgdb.
> > > >
> > > > ALSO NOTE: we still have the sketchy hack for setting the number of
> > > > bytes per TX FIFO word in place, but that one is less bad. kgdb
> > > > doesn't have any problem with this because it always just sends 1 byte
> > > > at a time and waits for it to finish. The TX FIFO hack is only really
> > > > needed for console output. In any case, a future patch will remove
> > > > that hack, too.
> > > >
> > > > Signed-off-by: Douglas Anderson <dianders@chromium.org>
> > > > ---
> > > >
> > > > drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c | 80 ++++++++++++++++++---------
> > > > 1 file changed, 55 insertions(+), 25 deletions(-)
> > > >
> > > > diff --git a/drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c b/drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c
> > > > index 0300867eab7a..4610e391e886 100644
> > > > --- a/drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c
> > > > +++ b/drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c
> > > > @@ -103,11 +103,13 @@
> > > > #define DEFAULT_IO_MACRO_IO2_IO3_MASK GENMASK(15, 4)
> > > > #define IO_MACRO_IO2_IO3_SWAP 0x4640
> > > >
> > > > -#ifdef CONFIG_CONSOLE_POLL
> > > > -#define CONSOLE_RX_BYTES_PW 1
> > > > -#else
> > > > -#define CONSOLE_RX_BYTES_PW 4
> > > > -#endif
> > > > +struct qcom_geni_private_data {
> > > > + /* NOTE: earlycon port will have NULL here */
> > > > + struct uart_driver *drv;
> > > > +
> > > > + u32 poll_cached_bytes;
> > > > + unsigned int poll_cached_bytes_cnt;
> > > > +};
> > > >
> > > > struct qcom_geni_serial_port {
> > > > struct uart_port uport;
> > > > @@ -129,6 +131,8 @@ struct qcom_geni_serial_port {
> > > > int wakeup_irq;
> > > > bool rx_tx_swap;
> > > > bool cts_rts_swap;
> > > > +
> > > > + struct qcom_geni_private_data private_data;
> > > > };
> > > >
> > > > static const struct uart_ops qcom_geni_console_pops;
> > > > @@ -264,8 +268,9 @@ static bool qcom_geni_serial_poll_bit(struct uart_port *uport,
> > > > unsigned int baud;
> > > > unsigned int fifo_bits;
> > > > unsigned long timeout_us = 20000;
> > > > + struct qcom_geni_private_data *private_data = uport->private_data;
> > > >
> > > > - if (uport->private_data) {
> > > > + if (private_data->drv) {
> > > > port = to_dev_port(uport, uport);
> > > > baud = port->baud;
> > > > if (!baud)
> > > > @@ -331,23 +336,42 @@ static void qcom_geni_serial_abort_rx(struct uart_port *uport)
> > > > }
> > > >
> > > > #ifdef CONFIG_CONSOLE_POLL
> > > > +
> > > > static int qcom_geni_serial_get_char(struct uart_port *uport)
> > > > {
> > > > - u32 rx_fifo;
> > > > + struct qcom_geni_private_data *private_data = uport->private_data;
> > > > u32 status;
> > > > + u32 word_cnt;
> > > > + int ret;
> > > > +
> > > > + if (!private_data->poll_cached_bytes_cnt) {
> > > > + status = readl(uport->membase + SE_GENI_M_IRQ_STATUS);
> > > > + writel(status, uport->membase + SE_GENI_M_IRQ_CLEAR);
> > > >
> > > > - status = readl(uport->membase + SE_GENI_M_IRQ_STATUS);
> > > > - writel(status, uport->membase + SE_GENI_M_IRQ_CLEAR);
> > > > + status = readl(uport->membase + SE_GENI_S_IRQ_STATUS);
> > > > + writel(status, uport->membase + SE_GENI_S_IRQ_CLEAR);
> > > >
> > > > - status = readl(uport->membase + SE_GENI_S_IRQ_STATUS);
> > > > - writel(status, uport->membase + SE_GENI_S_IRQ_CLEAR);
> > > > + status = readl(uport->membase + SE_GENI_RX_FIFO_STATUS);
> > > > + word_cnt = status & RX_FIFO_WC_MSK;
> > > > + if (!word_cnt)
> > > > + return NO_POLL_CHAR;
> > > >
> > > > - status = readl(uport->membase + SE_GENI_RX_FIFO_STATUS);
> > > > - if (!(status & RX_FIFO_WC_MSK))
> > > > - return NO_POLL_CHAR;
> > > > + if (word_cnt == 1 && (status & RX_LAST))
> > >
> > > I forget how the partial word snapping works. Are you sure you want
> > > word_cnt == 1? I see qcom_geni_serial_handle_rx() looks at RX_LAST
> > > independently as long as word_cnt != 0. I'm worried the hardware
> > > allows one FIFO entry with say 2 bytes in it and RX_LAST set, but then
> > > also piles new stuff in the FIFO behind it, so that word_cnt can be
> > > >1.
> >
> > So I guess one point of evidence that the logic I have there is OK is
> > that it works. :-P
> >
> > ...but also looking closer. Maybe first it's important to understand
> > the REALLY WEIRD protocol that geni serial uses. This was discovered
> > through a bunch of trial and error long ago when poking at how the
> > driver worked.
> >
> > When you're reading from geni it essentially breaks things into
> > packets. If you're midway through reading a packet of data and more
> > bytes come in then geni will hide them from you until you read the
> > whole packet. I'm not totally sure the exact conditions for when it
> > decides to make a packet out of the data, but it's not important for
> > this discussion.
> >
> > So when you read "RX_FIFO_WC" it tells you the total number of FIFO
> > words in the current packet. That number will only ever go down. A
> > packet is made up of some number of whole words plus one word that
> > could be a whole word or could be a partial word. So if "RX_FIFO_WC"
> > says 4 it means you've got 3 whole words (3 * 4 = 12 bytes) and one
> > word that might be partial. You can find out about that one partial
> > word (always the last word in the FIFO) by reading "RX_LAST" and
> > "RX_LAST_BYTE_VALID".
> >
> > Once you finally read the last word in the FIFO then geni can tell you
> > about the next packet of data.
> >
> > OK, so hopefully that made sense?
>
> I see, yes. In your description, the status register is a single
> storage element with a decrementing counter that stores the state for
> this current packet. Then it's a mystery how/where additional packets
> are buffered.
>
> In my mental model, RX_FIFO_WC tells you how many elements are
> occupied in the FIFO, regardless of packet boundaries. RX_LAST and
> byte count are actually little tags in each FIFO element. So a FIFO
> element internally consists of 4 data bytes + 3 status bits. Then that
> portion of the status register shows you the status/tag bits for the
> element at the top of the FIFO. I can't remember why I think it works
> this way, but it does explain how the hardware can queue/store
> multiple RX packets, and how it would handle overflows.
>
> >
> > So qcom_geni_serial_handle_rx() is trying to read ALL bytes. It first
> > figures out the total count of bytes and then reads them all. That's
> > why it needs to look at RX_LAST all the time. Also of note: RX_LAST
> > only ever applies to the last word in the FIFO. If it was possible
> > for the word count to grow _before_ fully clearing out the FIFO then
> > it would be a race and software would never be able to tell which byte
> > RX_LAST applied to.
>
> In my world, I was imagining word count could grow, since it showed
> the current fullness of the FIFO, but RX_LAST and BYTE_COUNT_MSK
> showed the tag bits for the current element. It looked like
> qcom_geni_serial_handle_rx() was coded for that since it seemed to
> only check that FIFO_WC was non-zero.

Ah, but look at how the ->handle_rx() call works. Specifically let's
look at handle_rx_console(). It takes in a count and just reads
everything without referring back to RX_LAST and RX_LAST_BYTE_VALID.
If your model was the one geni was actually using then wouldn't that
call need to be re-checking RX_LAST and RX_LAST_BYTE_VALID for each
FIFO entry? You can see that as it's reading from the FIFO it reads
all whole words first and then only reads a partial word for the very
last word in the packet.


> If you only check RX_LAST, and remove the word_cnt == 1, then the code
> is correct in both of our mental models of the hardware, right?

No. RX_LAST simply means "the last FIFO entry you read out will be
partial". So if:

RX_FIFO_WC = 2
RX_LAST = 1
RX_LAST_BYTE_VALID = 2

Then it's important to realize that if you read one FIFO element that
it will be a full word big. RX_LAST only applies to the last element.


> But TBH I've basically fabricated my mental model out of the air. So
> I'll defer to you if you're sure it works the way you've described.

Hopefully reading through handle_rx_console() and seeing that it never
looks at RX_LAST clarifies?

-Doug

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-07-10 21:25    [W:0.054 / U:0.144 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site