lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Jul]   [10]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH 2/2] serial: qcom_geni_serial: Always use 4 bytes per TX FIFO word
Hi,

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 10:46 AM Evan Green <evgreen@chromium.org> wrote:
>
> On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 1:01 PM Douglas Anderson <dianders@chromium.org> wrote:
> >
> > The geni serial driver had a rule that we'd only use 1 byte per FIFO
> > word for the TX FIFO if we were being used for the serial console.
> > This is ugly and a bit of a pain. It's not too hard to fix, so fix
> > it.
> >
> > Signed-off-by: Douglas Anderson <dianders@chromium.org>
> > ---
> >
> > drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c | 57 +++++++++++++++++----------
> > 1 file changed, 37 insertions(+), 20 deletions(-)
> >
> > diff --git a/drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c b/drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c
> > index 4610e391e886..583d903321b5 100644
> > --- a/drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c
> > +++ b/drivers/tty/serial/qcom_geni_serial.c
> > @@ -103,12 +103,18 @@
> > #define DEFAULT_IO_MACRO_IO2_IO3_MASK GENMASK(15, 4)
> > #define IO_MACRO_IO2_IO3_SWAP 0x4640
> >
> > +/* We always configure 4 bytes per FIFO word */
> > +#define BYTES_PER_FIFO_WORD 4
> > +
> > struct qcom_geni_private_data {
> > /* NOTE: earlycon port will have NULL here */
> > struct uart_driver *drv;
> >
> > u32 poll_cached_bytes;
> > unsigned int poll_cached_bytes_cnt;
> > +
> > + u32 write_cached_bytes;
> > + unsigned int write_cached_bytes_cnt;
> > };
> >
> > struct qcom_geni_serial_port {
> > @@ -121,8 +127,6 @@ struct qcom_geni_serial_port {
> > bool setup;
> > int (*handle_rx)(struct uart_port *uport, u32 bytes, bool drop);
> > unsigned int baud;
> > - unsigned int tx_bytes_pw;
> > - unsigned int rx_bytes_pw;
> > void *rx_fifo;
> > u32 loopback;
> > bool brk;
> > @@ -390,13 +394,25 @@ static void qcom_geni_serial_poll_put_char(struct uart_port *uport,
> > #ifdef CONFIG_SERIAL_QCOM_GENI_CONSOLE
> > static void qcom_geni_serial_wr_char(struct uart_port *uport, int ch)
> > {
> > - writel(ch, uport->membase + SE_GENI_TX_FIFOn);
> > + struct qcom_geni_private_data *private_data = uport->private_data;
> > +
> > + private_data->write_cached_bytes =
> > + (private_data->write_cached_bytes >> 8) | (ch << 24);
> > + private_data->write_cached_bytes_cnt++;
> > +
> > + if (private_data->write_cached_bytes_cnt == BYTES_PER_FIFO_WORD) {
> > + writel(private_data->write_cached_bytes,
> > + uport->membase + SE_GENI_TX_FIFOn);
> > + private_data->write_cached_bytes_cnt = 0;
> > + }
> > }
> >
> > static void
> > __qcom_geni_serial_console_write(struct uart_port *uport, const char *s,
> > unsigned int count)
> > {
> > + struct qcom_geni_private_data *private_data = uport->private_data;
> > +
> > int i;
> > u32 bytes_to_send = count;
> >
> > @@ -431,6 +447,15 @@ __qcom_geni_serial_console_write(struct uart_port *uport, const char *s,
> > SE_GENI_M_IRQ_CLEAR);
> > i += chars_to_write;
> > }
> > +
> > + if (private_data->write_cached_bytes_cnt) {
> > + private_data->write_cached_bytes >>= BITS_PER_BYTE *
> > + (BYTES_PER_FIFO_WORD - private_data->write_cached_bytes_cnt);
> > + writel(private_data->write_cached_bytes,
> > + uport->membase + SE_GENI_TX_FIFOn);
> > + private_data->write_cached_bytes_cnt = 0;
> > + }
>
> How does this not end up sending stray zeros? In other words, how does
> the hardware know which bytes of this word are valid?

We told it how many bytes we wanted to send in
qcom_geni_serial_setup_tx(). If the total number of bytes being sent
is not a multiple of the FIFO word size then it knows that the last
word will be a partial and it'll extract just the number of needed
bytes out of it.

Like receiving, sending bytes out of geni is also packet based.
Though the packets work a little differently for sending vs. receiving
in both cases you are supposed to fully finish a packet before you
send more bytes (you can sorta cancel / start a new packet, but that's
not what we're doing here). So ahead of time we told it how many
bytes to expect and then we sent them all.

NOTE: if we wanted to simplify this function at the expense of
efficiency, we could change it to always send 1-byte packets. Then
we'd start a packet, send 1 byte, wait for done, start a new packet,
send 1 byte, wait for done, etc. In fact, that's how the polling code
does it...


-Doug

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-07-10 20:28    [W:0.089 / U:6.392 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site