lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [May]   [22]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH] tracing: Fix events.rst section numbering
On Mon, 18 May 2020 13:29:24 -0500
Tom Zanussi <zanussi@kernel.org> wrote:

> The in-kernel trace event API should have its own section, and the
> duplicate section numbers need fixing as well.
>
> Signed-off-by: Tom Zanussi <zanussi@kernel.org>

Acked-by: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>

Jon,

Care to take this in your tree?

-- Steve

> Reported-by: Li Xinhai <lixinhai.lxh@gmail.com>
> ---
> Documentation/trace/events.rst | 28 ++++++++++++++--------------
> 1 file changed, 14 insertions(+), 14 deletions(-)
>
> diff --git a/Documentation/trace/events.rst b/Documentation/trace/events.rst
> index ed79b220bd07..1a3b7762cb0f 100644
> --- a/Documentation/trace/events.rst
> +++ b/Documentation/trace/events.rst
> @@ -526,8 +526,8 @@ The following commands are supported:
>
> See Documentation/trace/histogram.rst for details and examples.
>
> -6.3 In-kernel trace event API
> ------------------------------
> +7. In-kernel trace event API
> +============================
>
> In most cases, the command-line interface to trace events is more than
> sufficient. Sometimes, however, applications might find the need for
> @@ -559,8 +559,8 @@ following:
> - tracing synthetic events from in-kernel code
> - the low-level "dynevent_cmd" API
>
> -6.3.1 Dyamically creating synthetic event definitions
> ------------------------------------------------------
> +7.1 Dyamically creating synthetic event definitions
> +---------------------------------------------------
>
> There are a couple ways to create a new synthetic event from a kernel
> module or other kernel code.
> @@ -665,8 +665,8 @@ registered by calling the synth_event_gen_cmd_end() function:
> At this point, the event object is ready to be used for tracing new
> events.
>
> -6.3.3 Tracing synthetic events from in-kernel code
> ---------------------------------------------------
> +7.2 Tracing synthetic events from in-kernel code
> +------------------------------------------------
>
> To trace a synthetic event, there are several options. The first
> option is to trace the event in one call, using synth_event_trace()
> @@ -677,8 +677,8 @@ synth_event_trace_start() and synth_event_trace_end() along with
> synth_event_add_next_val() or synth_event_add_val() to add the values
> piecewise.
>
> -6.3.3.1 Tracing a synthetic event all at once
> ----------------------------------------------
> +7.2.1 Tracing a synthetic event all at once
> +-------------------------------------------
>
> To trace a synthetic event all at once, the synth_event_trace() or
> synth_event_trace_array() functions can be used.
> @@ -779,8 +779,8 @@ remove the event:
>
> ret = synth_event_delete("schedtest");
>
> -6.3.3.1 Tracing a synthetic event piecewise
> --------------------------------------------
> +7.2.2 Tracing a synthetic event piecewise
> +-----------------------------------------
>
> To trace a synthetic using the piecewise method described above, the
> synth_event_trace_start() function is used to 'open' the synthetic
> @@ -863,8 +863,8 @@ Note that synth_event_trace_end() must be called at the end regardless
> of whether any of the add calls failed (say due to a bad field name
> being passed in).
>
> -6.3.4 Dyamically creating kprobe and kretprobe event definitions
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> +7.3 Dyamically creating kprobe and kretprobe event definitions
> +--------------------------------------------------------------
>
> To create a kprobe or kretprobe trace event from kernel code, the
> kprobe_event_gen_cmd_start() or kretprobe_event_gen_cmd_start()
> @@ -940,8 +940,8 @@ used to give the kprobe event file back and delete the event:
>
> ret = kprobe_event_delete("gen_kprobe_test");
>
> -6.3.4 The "dynevent_cmd" low-level API
> ---------------------------------------
> +7.4 The "dynevent_cmd" low-level API
> +------------------------------------
>
> Both the in-kernel synthetic event and kprobe interfaces are built on
> top of a lower-level "dynevent_cmd" interface. This interface is

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-05-22 14:38    [W:0.069 / U:2.064 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site