lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Mar]   [9]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
SubjectRe: [locks] 6d390e4b5d: will-it-scale.per_process_ops -96.6% regression
From
Date
On Tue, 2020-03-10 at 08:42 +1100, NeilBrown wrote:
> On Mon, Mar 09 2020, Jeff Layton wrote:
>
> > On Mon, 2020-03-09 at 13:22 -0400, Jeff Layton wrote:
> > > On Mon, 2020-03-09 at 08:52 -0700, Linus Torvalds wrote:
> > > > On Mon, Mar 9, 2020 at 7:36 AM Jeff Layton <jlayton@kernel.org> wrote:
> > > > > On Sun, 2020-03-08 at 22:03 +0800, kernel test robot wrote:
> > > > > > FYI, we noticed a -96.6% regression of will-it-scale.per_process_ops due to commit:
> > > > >
> > > > > This is not completely unexpected as we're banging on the global
> > > > > blocked_lock_lock now for every unlock. This test just thrashes file
> > > > > locks and unlocks without doing anything in between, so the workload
> > > > > looks pretty artificial [1].
> > > > >
> > > > > It would be nice to avoid the global lock in this codepath, but it
> > > > > doesn't look simple to do. I'll keep thinking about it, but for now I'm
> > > > > inclined to ignore this result unless we see a problem in more realistic
> > > > > workloads.
> > > >
> > > > That is a _huge_ regression, though.
> > > >
> > > > What about something like the attached? Wouldn't that work? And make
> > > > the code actually match the old comment about wow "fl_blocker" being
> > > > NULL being special.
> > > >
> > > > The old code seemed to not know about things like memory ordering either.
> > > >
> > > > Patch is entirely untested, but aims to have that "smp_store_release()
> > > > means I'm done and not going to touch it any more", making that
> > > > smp_load_acquire() test hopefully be valid as per the comment..
> > >
> > > Yeah, something along those lines maybe. I don't think we can use
> > > fl_blocker that way though, as the wait_event_interruptible is waiting
> > > on it to go to NULL, and the wake_up happens before fl_blocker is
> > > cleared.
> > >
> > > Maybe we need to mix in some sort of FL_BLOCK_ACTIVE flag and use that
> > > instead of testing for !fl_blocker to see whether we can avoid the
> > > blocked_lock_lock?
> > >
> >
> > How about something like this instead? (untested other than for
> > compilation)
> >
> > Basically, this just switches the waiters over to wait for
> > fl_blocked_member to go empty. That still happens before the wakeup, so
> > it should be ok to wait on that.
> >
> > I think we can also eliminate the lockless list_empty check in
> > locks_delete_block, as the fl_blocker check should be sufficient now.
> > --
> > Jeff Layton <jlayton@kernel.org>
> > From c179d779c9b72838ed9996a65d686d86679d1639 Mon Sep 17 00:00:00 2001
> > From: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
> > Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2020 14:35:43 -0400
> > Subject: [PATCH] locks: reinstate locks_delete_lock optimization
> >
> > ...by using smp_load_acquire and smp_store_release to close the race
> > window.
> >
> > [ jlayton: wait on the fl_blocked_requests list to go empty instead of
> > the fl_blocker pointer to clear. Remove the list_empty check
> > from locks_delete_lock shortcut. ]
>
> Why do you think it is OK to remove that list_empty check? I don't
> think it is. There might be locked requests that need to be woken up.
>

Temporary braino. We definitely cannot remove that check.

> As the problem here is a use-after-free due to a race, one option would
> be to use rcu_free() on the file_lock, and hold rcu_read_lock() around
> test/use.
>

Yeah, I was considering this too, but Linus' approach seemed simpler.

> Another option is to use a different lock. The fl_wait contains a
> spinlock, and we have wake_up_locked() which is provided for exactly
> these sorts of situations where the wake_up call can race with a thread
> waking up.
>
> So my compile-tested-only proposal is below.
> I can probably a proper change-log entry if you think the patch is a
> good way to go.
>
> NeilBrown
>
>
> diff --git a/fs/locks.c b/fs/locks.c
> index 426b55d333d5..8aa04d5ac8b3 100644
> --- a/fs/locks.c
> +++ b/fs/locks.c
> @@ -735,11 +735,13 @@ static void __locks_wake_up_blocks(struct file_lock *blocker)
>
> waiter = list_first_entry(&blocker->fl_blocked_requests,
> struct file_lock, fl_blocked_member);
> + spin_lock(&waiter->fl_wait.lock);
> __locks_delete_block(waiter);
> if (waiter->fl_lmops && waiter->fl_lmops->lm_notify)
> waiter->fl_lmops->lm_notify(waiter);
> else
> - wake_up(&waiter->fl_wait);
> + wake_up_locked(&waiter->fl_wait);
> + spin_unlock(&waiter->fl_wait.lock);
> }
> }
>
> @@ -753,6 +755,31 @@ int locks_delete_block(struct file_lock *waiter)
> {
> int status = -ENOENT;
>
> + /*
> + * If fl_blocker is NULL, it won't be set again as this thread
> + * "owns" the lock and is the only one that might try to claim
> + * the lock. So it is safe to test fl_blocker locklessly.
> + * Also if fl_blocker is NULL, this waiter is not listed on
> + * fl_blocked_requests for some lock, so no other request can
> + * be added to the list of fl_blocked_requests for this
> + * request. So if fl_blocker is NULL, it is safe to
> + * locklessly check if fl_blocked_requests is empty. If both
> + * of these checks succeed, there is no need to take the lock.
> + * However, some other thread might have only *just* set
> + * fl_blocker to NULL and it about to send a wakeup on
> + * fl_wait, so we mustn't return too soon or we might free waiter
> + * before that wakeup can be sent. So take the fl_wait.lock
> + * to serialize with the wakeup in __locks_wake_up_blocks().
> + */
> + if (waiter->fl_blocker == NULL) {
> + spin_lock(&waiter->fl_wait.lock);
> + if (waiter->fl_blocker == NULL &&
> + list_empty(&waiter->fl_blocked_requests)) {
> + spin_unlock(&waiter->fl_wait.lock);
> + return status;
> + }
> + spin_unlock(&waiter->fl_wait.lock);
> + }
> spin_lock(&blocked_lock_lock);
> if (waiter->fl_blocker)
> status = 0;

Yeah, this is simpler for me to prove to myself that it's correct, and I
like that it touches less code, tbh. I'll give it a try here in a bit
and see if it also fixes up the perf regression.

FWIW, here's the variant of Linus' patch I've been testing. It seems to
fix the performance regression too.

--------------8<---------------

[PATCH] locks: reinstate locks_delete_lock optimization

There is measurable performance impact in some synthetic tests in commit
6d390e4b5d48 (locks: fix a potential use-after-free problem when wakeup
a waiter). Fix the race condition instead by clearing the fl_blocker
pointer after the wakeup and by using smp_load_acquire and
smp_store_release to handle the access.

This means that we can no longer use the clearing of fl_blocker clearing
as the wait condition, so switch over to checking whether the
fl_blocked_member list is empty.

[ jlayton: wait on the fl_blocked_requests list to go empty instead of
the fl_blocker pointer to clear. ]

Cc: yangerkun <yangerkun@huawei.com>
Fixes: 6d390e4b5d48 (locks: fix a potential use-after-free problem when wakeup a waiter)
Signed-off-by: Jeff Layton <jlayton@kernel.org>
---
fs/cifs/file.c | 3 ++-
fs/locks.c | 43 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++------
2 files changed, 39 insertions(+), 7 deletions(-)

diff --git a/fs/cifs/file.c b/fs/cifs/file.c
index 3b942ecdd4be..8f9d849a0012 100644
--- a/fs/cifs/file.c
+++ b/fs/cifs/file.c
@@ -1169,7 +1169,8 @@ cifs_posix_lock_set(struct file *file, struct file_lock *flock)
rc = posix_lock_file(file, flock, NULL);
up_write(&cinode->lock_sem);
if (rc == FILE_LOCK_DEFERRED) {
- rc = wait_event_interruptible(flock->fl_wait, !flock->fl_blocker);
+ rc = wait_event_interruptible(flock->fl_wait,
+ list_empty(&flock->fl_blocked_member));
if (!rc)
goto try_again;
locks_delete_block(flock);
diff --git a/fs/locks.c b/fs/locks.c
index 426b55d333d5..e78d37c73df5 100644
--- a/fs/locks.c
+++ b/fs/locks.c
@@ -725,7 +725,6 @@ static void __locks_delete_block(struct file_lock *waiter)
{
locks_delete_global_blocked(waiter);
list_del_init(&waiter->fl_blocked_member);
- waiter->fl_blocker = NULL;
}

static void __locks_wake_up_blocks(struct file_lock *blocker)
@@ -740,6 +739,12 @@ static void __locks_wake_up_blocks(struct file_lock *blocker)
waiter->fl_lmops->lm_notify(waiter);
else
wake_up(&waiter->fl_wait);
+
+ /*
+ * Tell the world we're done with it - see comment at
+ * top of locks_delete_block().
+ */
+ smp_store_release(&waiter->fl_blocker, NULL);
}
}

@@ -753,11 +758,32 @@ int locks_delete_block(struct file_lock *waiter)
{
int status = -ENOENT;

+ /*
+ * If fl_blocker is NULL, it won't be set again as this thread
+ * "owns" the lock and is the only one that might try to claim
+ * the lock. So it is safe to test fl_blocker locklessly.
+ * Also if fl_blocker is NULL, this waiter is not listed on
+ * fl_blocked_requests for some lock, so no other request can
+ * be added to the list of fl_blocked_requests for this
+ * request. So if fl_blocker is NULL, it is safe to
+ * locklessly check if fl_blocked_requests is empty. If both
+ * of these checks succeed, there is no need to take the lock.
+ */
+ if (!smp_load_acquire(&waiter->fl_blocker) &&
+ list_empty(&waiter->fl_blocked_requests))
+ return status;
+
spin_lock(&blocked_lock_lock);
if (waiter->fl_blocker)
status = 0;
__locks_wake_up_blocks(waiter);
__locks_delete_block(waiter);
+
+ /*
+ * Tell the world we're done with it - see comment at top
+ * of this function
+ */
+ smp_store_release(&waiter->fl_blocker, NULL);
spin_unlock(&blocked_lock_lock);
return status;
}
@@ -1350,7 +1376,8 @@ static int posix_lock_inode_wait(struct inode *inode, struct file_lock *fl)
error = posix_lock_inode(inode, fl, NULL);
if (error != FILE_LOCK_DEFERRED)
break;
- error = wait_event_interruptible(fl->fl_wait, !fl->fl_blocker);
+ error = wait_event_interruptible(fl->fl_wait,
+ list_empty(&fl->fl_blocked_member));
if (error)
break;
}
@@ -1435,7 +1462,8 @@ int locks_mandatory_area(struct inode *inode, struct file *filp, loff_t start,
error = posix_lock_inode(inode, &fl, NULL);
if (error != FILE_LOCK_DEFERRED)
break;
- error = wait_event_interruptible(fl.fl_wait, !fl.fl_blocker);
+ error = wait_event_interruptible(fl.fl_wait,
+ list_empty(&fl.fl_blocked_member));
if (!error) {
/*
* If we've been sleeping someone might have
@@ -1638,7 +1666,8 @@ int __break_lease(struct inode *inode, unsigned int mode, unsigned int type)

locks_dispose_list(&dispose);
error = wait_event_interruptible_timeout(new_fl->fl_wait,
- !new_fl->fl_blocker, break_time);
+ list_empty(&new_fl->fl_blocked_member),
+ break_time);

percpu_down_read(&file_rwsem);
spin_lock(&ctx->flc_lock);
@@ -2122,7 +2151,8 @@ static int flock_lock_inode_wait(struct inode *inode, struct file_lock *fl)
error = flock_lock_inode(inode, fl);
if (error != FILE_LOCK_DEFERRED)
break;
- error = wait_event_interruptible(fl->fl_wait, !fl->fl_blocker);
+ error = wait_event_interruptible(fl->fl_wait,
+ list_empty(&fl->fl_blocked_member));
if (error)
break;
}
@@ -2399,7 +2429,8 @@ static int do_lock_file_wait(struct file *filp, unsigned int cmd,
error = vfs_lock_file(filp, cmd, fl, NULL);
if (error != FILE_LOCK_DEFERRED)
break;
- error = wait_event_interruptible(fl->fl_wait, !fl->fl_blocker);
+ error = wait_event_interruptible(fl->fl_wait,
+ list_empty(&fl->fl_blocked_member));
if (error)
break;
}
--
2.24.1

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-03-09 22:58    [W:0.174 / U:0.428 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site