lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Feb]   [6]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [PATCH] mm: fix a data race in put_page()
From
Date


> On Feb 6, 2020, at 7:27 PM, John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com> wrote:
>
> On 2/6/20 4:18 PM, Qian Cai wrote:
>>> On Feb 6, 2020, at 6:34 PM, John Hubbard <jhubbard@nvidia.com> wrote:
>>> On 2/6/20 7:23 AM, Qian Cai wrote:
>>>>> On Feb 6, 2020, at 9:55 AM, Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz> wrote:
>>>>> I don't think the problem is real. The question is how to make KCSAN happy
>>>>> in a way that doesn't silence other possibly useful things it can find and
>>>>> also which makes it most obvious to the reader what's going on... IMHO
>>>>> using READ_ONCE() fulfills these targets nicely - it is free
>>>>> performance-wise in this case, it silences the checker without impacting
>>>>> other races on page->flags, its kind of obvious we don't want the load torn
>>>>> in this case so it makes sense to the reader (although a comment may be
>>>>> nice).
>>>>
>>>> Actually, use the data_race() macro there fulfilling the same purpose too, i.e, silence the splat here but still keep searching for other races.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Yes, but both READ_ONCE() and data_race() would be saying untrue things about this code,
>>> and that somewhat offends my sense of perfection... :)
>>>
>>> * READ_ONCE(): this field need not be restricted to being read only once, so the
>>> name is immediately wrong. We're using side effects of READ_ONCE().
>>>
>>> * data_race(): there is no race on the N bits worth of page zone number data. There
>>> is only a perceived race, due to tools that look at word-level granularity.
>>>
>>> I'd propose one or both of the following:
>>>
>>> a) Hope that Marco (I've fixed the typo in his name. --jh) has an idea to enhance KCSAN so as to support this model of
>>> access, and/or
>>
>> A similar thing was brought up before, i.e., anything compared to zero is immune to load-tearing
>> issues, but it is rather difficult to implement it in the compiler, so it was settled to use data_race(),
>>
>> https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/CANpmjNN8J1oWtLPHTgCwbbtTuU_Js-8HD=cozW5cYkm8h-GTBg@mail.gmail.com/#r
>>
>
>
> Thanks for that link to the previous discussion, good context.
>
>
>>>
>>> b) Add a new, better-named macro to indicate what's going on. Initial bikeshed-able
>>> candidates:
>>>
>>> READ_RO_BITS()
>>> READ_IMMUTABLE_BITS()
>>> ...etc...
>>>
>>
>> Actually, Linus might hate those kinds of complication rather than a simple data_race() macro,
>>
>> https://lore.kernel.org/linux-fsdevel/CAHk-=wg5CkOEF8DTez1Qu0XTEFw_oHhxN98bDnFqbY7HL5AB2g@mail.gmail.com/
>>
>
> Another good link. However, my macros above haven't been proposed yet, and I'm perfectly
> comfortable proposing something that Linus *might* (or might not!) hate. No point in
> guessing about it, IMHO.
>
> If you want, I'll be happy to put on my flame suit and post a patchset proposing
> READ_IMMUTABLE_BITS() (or a better-named thing, if someone has another name idea). :)
>

BTW, the current comment said (note, it is called “access” which in this case it does read the whole word
rather than those 3 bits, even though it is only those bits are of interested for us),

/*
* data_race(): macro to document that accesses in an expression may conflict with
* other concurrent accesses resulting in data races, but the resulting
* behaviour is deemed safe regardless.
*
* This macro *does not* affect normal code generation, but is a hint to tooling
* that data races here should be ignored.
*/

Macro might have more to say.
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-02-07 01:56    [W:0.077 / U:31.852 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site