lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Oct]   [1]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH V7 3/5] platform/x86: Intel PMT class driver
On Thu, Oct 1, 2020 at 4:43 AM David E. Box <david.e.box@linux.intel.com> wrote:
>
> From: Alexander Duyck <alexander.h.duyck@linux.intel.com>
>
> Intel Platform Monitoring Technology is meant to provide a common way to
> access telemetry and system metrics.
>
> Register mappings are not provided by the driver. Instead, a GUID is read
> from a header for each endpoint. The GUID identifies the device and is to
> be used with an XML, provided by the vendor, to discover the available set
> of metrics and their register mapping. This allows firmware updates to
> modify the register space without needing to update the driver every time
> with new mappings. Firmware writes a new GUID in this case to specify the
> new mapping. Software tools with access to the associated XML file can
> then interpret the changes.

Where one may find a database of these reserved GUIDs / XMLs?
How do you prevent a chaos which happens with other registries?

> The module manages access to all Intel PMT endpoints on a system,
> independent of the device exporting them. It creates an intel_pmt class to
> manage the devices. For each telemetry endpoint, sysfs files provide GUID
> and size information as well as a pointer to the parent device the
> telemetry came from. Software may discover the association between
> endpoints and devices by iterating through the list in sysfs, or by looking
> for the existence of the class folder under the device of interest. A
> binary sysfs attribute of the same name allows software to then read or map
> the telemetry space for direct access.

What are the security implications by direct access?

...

> +static const struct pci_device_id pmt_telem_early_client_pci_ids[] = {
> + { PCI_VDEVICE(INTEL, 0x9a0d) }, /* TGL */
> + { }
> +};
> +bool intel_pmt_is_early_client_hw(struct device *dev)
> +{
> + struct pci_dev *parent = to_pci_dev(dev->parent);
> +
> + return !!pci_match_id(pmt_telem_early_client_pci_ids, parent);
> +}
> +EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(intel_pmt_is_early_client_hw);

What is this and why is it in the class driver?

> +static ssize_t
> +intel_pmt_read(struct file *filp, struct kobject *kobj,
> + struct bin_attribute *attr, char *buf, loff_t off,
> + size_t count)
> +{
> + struct intel_pmt_entry *entry = container_of(attr,
> + struct intel_pmt_entry,
> + pmt_bin_attr);

> + if (off < 0)
> + return -EINVAL;

Is this real or theoretical?

> + if (count)

Useless.

> + memcpy_fromio(buf, entry->base + off, count);
> +
> + return count;
> +}

...

> + psize = (PFN_UP(entry->base_addr + entry->size) - pfn) * PAGE_SIZE;

PFN_PHYS(PFN_UP(...)) ?

...

> +static struct attribute *intel_pmt_attrs[] = {
> + &dev_attr_guid.attr,
> + &dev_attr_size.attr,
> + &dev_attr_offset.attr,
> + NULL
> +};

> +

Unneeded blank line.

> +ATTRIBUTE_GROUPS(intel_pmt);

...

> + /* if size is 0 assume no data buffer, so no file needed */
> + if (!entry->size)
> + return 0;

Hmm... But presence of the file is also an information that might be
useful for user, no?

...

> + entry->base = devm_ioremap_resource(dev, &res);

(1)

> + if (IS_ERR(entry->base)) {

> + dev_err(dev, "Failed to ioremap device region\n");

Duplicates core message.

> + ret = -EIO;

Why shadowing real error code?

> + goto fail_ioremap;
> + }

> + iounmap(entry->base);

This is interesting. How do you avoid double unmap with (1)?

> +#include <linux/platform_device.h>
> +#include <linux/xarray.h>
> +
> +/* PMT access types */
> +#define ACCESS_BARID 2
> +#define ACCESS_LOCAL 3
> +
> +/* PMT discovery base address/offset register layout */
> +#define GET_BIR(v) ((v) & GENMASK(2, 0))
> +#define GET_ADDRESS(v) ((v) & GENMASK(31, 3))

bits.h

> +struct intel_pmt_entry {
> + struct bin_attribute pmt_bin_attr;
> + struct kobject *kobj;
> + void __iomem *disc_table;
> + void __iomem *base;
> + unsigned long base_addr;
> + size_t size;

> + u32 guid;

types.h

> + int devid;
> +};

> +static inline int
> +intel_pmt_ioremap_discovery_table(struct intel_pmt_entry *entry,
> + struct platform_device *pdev, int i)
> +{

> + entry->disc_table = devm_platform_ioremap_resource(pdev, i);

io.h ?

> +
> + return PTR_ERR_OR_ZERO(entry->disc_table);

err.h

> +}

The rule of thumb is to include all headers that you have direct users of.
Then you may optimize by removing those which are guaranteed to be
included by others, like
bits.h always included by bitops.h.


--
With Best Regards,
Andy Shevchenko

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-10-01 18:24    [W:0.083 / U:7.208 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site