lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Jan]   [6]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH v8 3/3] test: Add test for pidfd getfd
On Sun, Jan 05, 2020 at 07:08:13PM +0000, Sargun Dhillon wrote:
> On Sun, Jan 05, 2020 at 03:20:23PM +0100, Christian Brauner wrote:
> > On Fri, Jan 03, 2020 at 08:29:28AM -0800, Sargun Dhillon wrote:
> > > +static int sys_pidfd_getfd(int pidfd, int fd, int flags)
> > > +{
> > > + return syscall(__NR_pidfd_getfd, pidfd, fd, flags);
> > > +}
> >
> > I think you can move this to the pidfd.h header as:
> >
> > static inline int sys_pidfd_getfd(int pidfd, int fd, int flags)
> > {
> > return syscall(__NR_pidfd_getfd, pidfd, fd, flags);
> > }
> >
> > Note, this also needs an
> >
> > #ifndef __NR_pidfd_getfd
> > __NR_pidfd_getfd -1
> > #endif
> > so that compilation doesn't fail.
> >
> I'll go ahead and move this into pidfd.h, and follow the pattern there. I
> don't think it's worth checking if each time the return code is ENOSYS.
>
> Does it make sense to add something like:
> #ifdef __NR_pidfd_getfd
> TEST_HARNESS_MAIN
> #else
> int main(void)
> {
> fprintf(stderr, "pidfd_getfd syscall not supported\n");
> return KSFT_SKIP;
> }
> #endif
>
> to short-circuit the entire test suite?

You mean the getfd testsuite? If so and that works, then sounds like a
good idea to me.

>
>
> > > +
> > > +static int sys_memfd_create(const char *name, unsigned int flags)
> > > +{
> > > + return syscall(__NR_memfd_create, name, flags);
> > > +}
> > > +
> > > +static int __child(int sk, int memfd)
> > > +{
> > > + int ret;
> > > + char buf;
> > > +
> > > + /*
> > > + * Ensure we don't leave around a bunch of orphaned children if our
> > > + * tests fail.
> > > + */
> > > + ret = prctl(PR_SET_PDEATHSIG, SIGKILL);
> > > + if (ret) {
> > > + fprintf(stderr, "%s: Child could not set DEATHSIG\n",
> > > + strerror(errno));
> > > + return EXIT_FAILURE;
> >
> > return -1
> >
> > > + }
> > > +
> > > + ret = send(sk, &memfd, sizeof(memfd), 0);
> > > + if (ret != sizeof(memfd)) {
> > > + fprintf(stderr, "%s: Child failed to send fd number\n",
> > > + strerror(errno));
> > > + return EXIT_FAILURE;
> >
> > return -1
> >
> > > + }
> > > +
> > > + while ((ret = recv(sk, &buf, sizeof(buf), 0)) > 0) {
> > > + if (buf == 'P') {
> > > + ret = prctl(PR_SET_DUMPABLE, 0);
> > > + if (ret < 0) {
> > > + fprintf(stderr,
> > > + "%s: Child failed to disable ptrace\n",
> > > + strerror(errno));
> > > + return EXIT_FAILURE;
> >
> > return -1
> >
> > > + }
> > > + } else {
> > > + fprintf(stderr, "Child received unknown command %c\n",
> > > + buf);
> > > + return EXIT_FAILURE;
> >
> > return -1
> >
> > > + }
> > > + ret = send(sk, &buf, sizeof(buf), 0);
> > > + if (ret != 1) {
> > > + fprintf(stderr, "%s: Child failed to ack\n",
> > > + strerror(errno));
> > > + return EXIT_FAILURE;
> >
> > return -1
> >
> > > + }
> > > + }
> > > +
> > > + if (ret < 0) {
> > > + fprintf(stderr, "%s: Child failed to read from socket\n",
> > > + strerror(errno));
> >
> > Is this intentional that this is no failure?
> >
> My thought here, is the only case where this should happen is if the "ptrace
> command" was not properly "transmitted", and the ptrace test itself would fail.
>
> I can add an explicit exit failure here.

Ok.

>
> > > + }
> > > +
> > > + return EXIT_SUCCESS;
> >
> > return 0
> >
> > > +}
> > > +
> > > +static int child(int sk)
> > > +{
> > > + int memfd, ret;
> > > +
> > > + memfd = sys_memfd_create("test", 0);
> > > + if (memfd < 0) {
> > > + fprintf(stderr, "%s: Child could not create memfd\n",
> > > + strerror(errno));
> > > + ret = EXIT_FAILURE;
> >
> > ret = -1;
> >
> > > + } else {
> > > + ret = __child(sk, memfd);
> > > + close(memfd);
> > > + }
> > > +
> > > + close(sk);
> > > + return ret;
> > > +}
> > > +
> > > +FIXTURE(child)
> > > +{
> > > + pid_t pid;
> > > + int pidfd, sk, remote_fd;
> > > +};
> > > +
> > > +FIXTURE_SETUP(child)
> > > +{
> > > + int ret, sk_pair[2];
> > > +
> > > + ASSERT_EQ(0, socketpair(PF_LOCAL, SOCK_SEQPACKET, 0, sk_pair))
> > > + {
> > > + TH_LOG("%s: failed to create socketpair", strerror(errno));
> > > + }
> > > + self->sk = sk_pair[0];
> > > +
> > > + self->pid = fork();
> > > + ASSERT_GE(self->pid, 0);
> > > +
> > > + if (self->pid == 0) {
> > > + close(sk_pair[0]);
> > > + exit(child(sk_pair[1]));
> >
> > if (child(sk_pair[1]))
> > _exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
> > _exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
> >
> > I would like to only use exit macros where one actually calls
> > {_}exit()s. It makes the logic easier to follow and ensures that one
> > doesn't accidently do an exit(-21345) or something (e.g. when adding new
> > code).
> >
> > > + }
> > > +
> > > + close(sk_pair[1]);
> > > +
> > > + self->pidfd = sys_pidfd_open(self->pid, 0);
> > > + ASSERT_GE(self->pidfd, 0);
> > > +
> > > + /*
> > > + * Wait for the child to complete setup. It'll send the remote memfd's
> > > + * number when ready.
> > > + */
> > > + ret = recv(sk_pair[0], &self->remote_fd, sizeof(self->remote_fd), 0);
> > > + ASSERT_EQ(sizeof(self->remote_fd), ret);
> > > +}
> > > +
> > > +FIXTURE_TEARDOWN(child)
> > > +{
> > > + int status;
> > > +
> > > + EXPECT_EQ(0, close(self->pidfd));
> > > + EXPECT_EQ(0, close(self->sk));
> > > +
> > > + EXPECT_EQ(waitpid(self->pid, &status, 0), self->pid);
> > > + EXPECT_EQ(true, WIFEXITED(status));
> > > + EXPECT_EQ(0, WEXITSTATUS(status));
> > > +}
> > > +
> > > +TEST_F(child, disable_ptrace)
> > > +{
> > > + int uid, fd;
> > > + char c;
> > > +
> > > + /*
> > > + * Turn into nobody if we're root, to avoid CAP_SYS_PTRACE
> > > + *
> > > + * The tests should run in their own process, so even this test fails,
> > > + * it shouldn't result in subsequent tests failing.
> > > + */
> > > + uid = getuid();
> > > + if (uid == 0)
> > > + ASSERT_EQ(0, seteuid(USHRT_MAX));
> >
> > Hm, isn't it safer to do 65535 explicitly? Since USHRT_MAX can
> > technically be greater than 65535.
> >
> I borrowed this from the BPF tests. I can hardcode something like:
> #define NOBODY_UID 65535
> and setuid to that, if you think it's safer?

If you want to specifically seteuid() to 65535 then yes, using the
hard-coded number or using a dedicated macro seems better.

>
> > > +
> > > + ASSERT_EQ(1, send(self->sk, "P", 1, 0));
> > > + ASSERT_EQ(1, recv(self->sk, &c, 1, 0));
> > > +
> > > + fd = sys_pidfd_getfd(self->pidfd, self->remote_fd, 0);
> > > + EXPECT_EQ(-1, fd);
> > > + EXPECT_EQ(EPERM, errno);
> > > +
> > > + if (uid == 0)
> > > + ASSERT_EQ(0, seteuid(0));
> > > +}
> > > +
> > > +TEST_F(child, fetch_fd)
> > > +{
> > > + int fd, ret;
> > > +
> > > + fd = sys_pidfd_getfd(self->pidfd, self->remote_fd, 0);
> > > + ASSERT_GE(fd, 0);
> > > +
> > > + EXPECT_EQ(0, sys_kcmp(getpid(), self->pid, KCMP_FILE, fd, self->remote_fd));
> >
> > So most of these tests seem to take place when the child has already
> > called exit() - or at least it's very likely that the child has already
> > called exit() - and remains a zombie. That's not ideal because
> > that's not the common scenario/use-case. Usually the task of which we
> > want to get an fd will be alive. Also, if the child has already called
> > exit(), by the time it returns to userspace it should have already
> > called exit_files() and so I wonder whether this test would fail if it's
> > run after the child has exited. Maybe I'm missing something here... Is
> > there some ordering enforced by TEST_F()?
> Yeah, I think perhaps I was being too clever.
> The timeline roughly goes something like this:
>
> # Fixture bringup
> [parent] creates socket_pair
> [parent] forks, and passes pair down to child
> [parent] waits to read sizeof(int) from the sk_pair
> [child] creates memfd
> [__child] sends local memfd number to parent via sk_pair
> [__child] waits to read from sk_pair
> [parent] reads remote memfd number from socket
> # Test
> [parent] performs tests
> # Fixture teardown
> [parent] closes sk_pair
> [__child] reads 0 from recv on sk_pair, implies the other end is closed
> [__child] Returns / exits 0
> [parent] Reaps child / reads exit code
>
> ---
> The one case where this is not true, is if the parent sends 'P' to the sk pair,
> it triggers setting PR_SET_DUMPABLE to 0, and then resumes waiting for the fd to
> close.
>
> Maybe I'm being too clever? Instead, the alternative was to send explicit stop /
> start messages across the sk_pair, but that got kind of ugly. Do you have a
> better suggestion?

If I understand correctly you just need to block the child to stop it
from exiting. Couldn't you do this by simply calling recv() on the
socket in the child thereby blocking it? At the end you just send a
final message to proceed and if that doesn't work SIGKILL it?

>
> >
> > Also, what does self->pid point to? The fd of the already exited child?
> It's just the pid of the child. pidfd is the fd of the (unexited) child.

Ah, thanks!
Christian

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-01-06 18:19    [W:0.162 / U:0.024 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site