lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Jan]   [4]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectRe: [bugreport] "hwclock -w" reset time instead of setting the right time
Date
Hi Mike:
Yes, We do check the time in BIOS Menu after first reboot.

We do some further tests in our X570 platform:
* "AMD Ryzen 7 3700X" with mainboard "ASUS ROG STRIX X570-E GAMING".
* OS is Fedora rawhide, with default Kernel version which is shown as
follows:
$uname -a
Linux bogon 5.5.0-0.rc4.git0.1.fc32.x86_64 #1 SMP Mon Dec 30 06:32:36
UTC 2019 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

And we upgrade/downgrade BIOS version from 1005/1201/1404/1405, and we
found out that :
* OLD BIOS version 1005/1201 does not reset the rtc time and keep the
setup rtc time after reboot.
* NEW BIOS version 1404/1405 DO reset the rtc time to 2019/01/01 after
reboot.

Detailed pictures of the BIOS time after reboot is shown in [2],

We suspect the BIOS 1201->1404 upgrade might cause this issue.
From x570 BIOS changelog [1], we found that the big difference between
1201/1404 is the AMD AM4 PI upgrade from AGESA 1.0.0.3ABBA to AM4 combo
PI 1.0.0.4 patch B,

If possible, please tell us about the BIOS version and your hardware
platform,
which can be get from BIOS UI or using "dmidecode" in Linux env.

Reference:
[1]:
https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/ROG-Strix-X570-E-Gaming/HelpDesk_BIOS/
[2]:https://github.com/fjkbo/rtc
https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fjkbo/rtc/master/1005.jpg
https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fjkbo/rtc/master/1201.jpg
https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fjkbo/rtc/master/1404.jpg
https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fjkbo/rtc/master/1405.jpg

--
Best Regards,
Jinke Fan.

On 2020/1/4 16:25, Mikhail Gavrilov wrote:
> On Sat, 4 Jan 2020 at 10:46, Jinke Fan <fanjinke@hygon.cn> wrote:
>>
>> I watched the video on youtube. The date is reseted when startup into
>> bios at Mike's platform.
>> As we know that the bios will check the validity of rtc time, if not,
>> bios will reset the rtc time. RTC time reset may be done by the BIOS.
>
> Did you disable automatic time synchronization?
> By default Fedora GNOME doing automatic time synchronization.
> For this reason, it’s more correct to immediately go into the BIOS
> after a reboot and there check the time value or turn off automatic
> time synchronization
>
> --
> Best Regards,
> Mike Gavrilov.
>
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-01-04 12:38    [W:0.045 / U:1.392 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site