lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Jan]   [28]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 1/2] printk: add lockless buffer
On Tue, 28 Jan 2020 17:25:47 +0106
John Ogness <john.ogness@linutronix.de> wrote:

> diff --git a/kernel/printk/printk_ringbuffer.c b/kernel/printk/printk_ringbuffer.c
> new file mode 100644
> index 000000000000..796257f226ee
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/kernel/printk/printk_ringbuffer.c
> @@ -0,0 +1,1370 @@
> +// SPDX-License-Identifier: GPL-2.0
> +
> +#include <linux/kernel.h>
> +#include <linux/irqflags.h>
> +#include <linux/string.h>
> +#include <linux/errno.h>
> +#include <linux/bug.h>
> +#include "printk_ringbuffer.h"
> +
> +/**
> + * DOC: printk_ringbuffer overview
> + *
> + * Data Structure
> + * --------------
> + * The printk_ringbuffer is made up of 3 internal ringbuffers::
> + *
> + * * desc_ring: A ring of descriptors. A descriptor contains all record
> + * meta data (sequence number, timestamp, loglevel, etc.)
> + * as well as internal state information about the record
> + * and logical positions specifying where in the other
> + * ringbuffers the text and dictionary strings are
> + * located.
> + *
> + * * text_data_ring: A ring of data blocks. A data block consists of an
> + * unsigned long integer (ID) that maps to a desc_ring
> + * index followed by the text string of the record.
> + *
> + * * dict_data_ring: A ring of data blocks. A data block consists of an
> + * unsigned long integer (ID) that maps to a desc_ring
> + * index followed by the dictionary string of the record.
> + *
> + * Implementation
> + * --------------
> + *
> + * ABA Issues
> + * ~~~~~~~~~~
> + * To help avoid ABA issues, descriptors are referenced by IDs (index values
> + * with tagged states) and data blocks are referenced by logical positions
> + * (index values with tagged states). However, on 32-bit systems the number
> + * of tagged states is relatively small such that an ABA incident is (at
> + * least theoretically) possible. For example, if 4 million maximally sized

4 million? I'm guessing that maximally sized printk messages are 1k?

Perhaps say that, otherwise one might think this is a mistake. "4
million maximally sized (1k) printk messages"

> + * printk messages were to occur in NMI context on a 32-bit system, the
> + * interrupted task would not be able to recognize that the 32-bit integer
> + * wrapped and thus represents a different data block than the one the
> + * interrupted task expects.
> + *
> + * To help combat this possibility, additional state checking is performed
> + * (such as using cmpxchg() even though set() would suffice). These extra
> + * checks will hopefully catch any ABA issue that a 32-bit system might
> + * experience.
> + *
[..]

> + * Usage
> + * -----
> + * Here are some simple examples demonstrating writers and readers. For the
> + * examples a global ringbuffer (test_rb) is available (which is not the
> + * actual ringbuffer used by printk)::
> + *
> + * DECLARE_PRINTKRB(test_rb, 15, 5, 3);
> + *
> + * This ringbuffer allows up to 32768 records (2 ^ 15) and has a size of
> + * 1 MiB (2 ^ 20) for text data and 256 KiB (2 ^ 18) for dictionary data.

(2 ^ (15 + 5)) ... (2 ^ (15 + 3)) ?

I'll play around more with this this week. But so far it looks good.

-- Steve

> + *
> + * Sample writer code::
> + *
> + * struct prb_reserved_entry e;
> + * struct printk_record r;
> + *
> + * // specify how much to allocate
> + * r.text_buf_size = strlen(textstr) + 1;
> + * r.dict_buf_size = strlen(dictstr) + 1;
> + *
> + * if (prb_reserve(&e, &test_rb, &r)) {
> + * snprintf(r.text_buf, r.text_buf_size, "%s", textstr);
> + *
> + * // dictionary allocation may have failed
> + * if (r.dict_buf)
> + * snprintf(r.dict_buf, r.dict_buf_size, "%s", dictstr);
> + *
> + * r.info->ts_nsec = local_clock();
> + *
> + * prb_commit(&e);
> + * }
> + *

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-01-29 04:54    [W:0.103 / U:2.380 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site