lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Jan]   [11]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
From
Subject[PATCH 5.4 074/165] Btrfs: fix cloning range with a hole when using the NO_HOLES feature
Date
From: Filipe Manana <fdmanana@suse.com>

[ Upstream commit fcb970581dd900675c4371c2b688a57924a8368c ]

When using the NO_HOLES feature if we clone a range that contains a hole
and a temporary ENOSPC happens while dropping extents from the target
inode's range, we can end up failing and aborting the transaction with
-EEXIST or with a corrupt file extent item, that has a length greater
than it should and overlaps with other extents. For example when cloning
the following range from inode A to inode B:

Inode A:

extent A1 extent A2
[ ----------- ] [ hole, implicit, 4MB length ] [ ------------- ]
0 1MB 5MB 6MB

Range to clone: [1MB, 6MB)

Inode B:

extent B1 extent B2 extent B3 extent B4
[ ---------- ] [ --------- ] [ ---------- ] [ ---------- ]
0 1MB 1MB 2MB 2MB 5MB 5MB 6MB

Target range: [1MB, 6MB) (same as source, to make it easier to explain)

The following can happen:

1) btrfs_punch_hole_range() gets -ENOSPC from __btrfs_drop_extents();

2) At that point, 'cur_offset' is set to 1MB and __btrfs_drop_extents()
set 'drop_end' to 2MB, meaning it was able to drop only extent B2;

3) We then compute 'clone_len' as 'drop_end' - 'cur_offset' = 2MB - 1MB =
1MB;

4) We then attempt to insert a file extent item at inode B with a file
offset of 5MB, which is the value of clone_info->file_offset. This
fails with error -EEXIST because there's already an extent at that
offset (extent B4);

5) We abort the current transaction with -EEXIST and return that error
to user space as well.

Another example, for extent corruption:

Inode A:

extent A1 extent A2
[ ----------- ] [ hole, implicit, 10MB length ] [ ------------- ]
0 1MB 11MB 12MB

Inode B:

extent B1 extent B2
[ ----------- ] [ --------- ] [ ----------------------------- ]
0 1MB 1MB 5MB 5MB 12MB

Target range: [1MB, 12MB) (same as source, to make it easier to explain)

1) btrfs_punch_hole_range() gets -ENOSPC from __btrfs_drop_extents();

2) At that point, 'cur_offset' is set to 1MB and __btrfs_drop_extents()
set 'drop_end' to 5MB, meaning it was able to drop only extent B2;

3) We then compute 'clone_len' as 'drop_end' - 'cur_offset' = 5MB - 1MB =
4MB;

4) We then insert a file extent item at inode B with a file offset of 11MB
which is the value of clone_info->file_offset, and a length of 4MB (the
value of 'clone_len'). So we get 2 extents items with ranges that
overlap and an extent length of 4MB, larger then the extent A2 from
inode A (1MB length);

5) After that we end the transaction, balance the btree dirty pages and
then start another or join the previous transaction. It might happen
that the transaction which inserted the incorrect extent was committed
by another task so we end up with extent corruption if a power failure
happens.

So fix this by making sure we attempt to insert the extent to clone at
the destination inode only if we are past dropping the sub-range that
corresponds to a hole.

Fixes: 690a5dbfc51315 ("Btrfs: fix ENOSPC errors, leading to transaction aborts, when cloning extents")
Signed-off-by: Filipe Manana <fdmanana@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: David Sterba <dsterba@suse.com>
Signed-off-by: Sasha Levin <sashal@kernel.org>
---
fs/btrfs/file.c | 4 ++--
1 file changed, 2 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)

diff --git a/fs/btrfs/file.c b/fs/btrfs/file.c
index c332968f9056..eaafd00f93d4 100644
--- a/fs/btrfs/file.c
+++ b/fs/btrfs/file.c
@@ -2601,8 +2601,8 @@ int btrfs_punch_hole_range(struct inode *inode, struct btrfs_path *path,
}
}

- if (clone_info) {
- u64 clone_len = drop_end - cur_offset;
+ if (clone_info && drop_end > clone_info->file_offset) {
+ u64 clone_len = drop_end - clone_info->file_offset;

ret = btrfs_insert_clone_extent(trans, inode, path,
clone_info, clone_len);
--
2.20.1


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-01-11 11:27    [W:0.401 / U:9.444 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site