lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Aug]   [10]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH] dpaa2-ethsw: move the DPAA2 Ethernet Switch driver out of staging
Date
On 8/9/19 10:05 PM, Andrew Lunn wrote:
> Hi Ioana

Hi Andrew,

>
>> +static int
>> +ethsw_get_link_ksettings(struct net_device *netdev,
>> + struct ethtool_link_ksettings *link_ksettings)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = netdev_priv(netdev);
>> + struct dpsw_link_state state = {0};
>> + int err = 0;
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_if_get_link_state(port_priv->ethsw_data->mc_io, 0,
>> + port_priv->ethsw_data->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx,
>> + &state);
>> + if (err) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev, "ERROR %d getting link state", err);
>> + goto out;
>> + }
>> +
>> + /* At the moment, we have no way of interrogating the DPMAC
>> + * from the DPSW side or there may not exist a DPMAC at all.
>
> What use is a switch port without a MAC?

In the DPAA2 architecture MACs are not the only entities that can be
connected to a switch port.
Below is an exemple of a 4 port DPAA2 switch which is configured to
interconnect 2 DPNIs (network interfaces) and 2 DPMACs.


[ethA] [ethB] [ethC] [ethD] [ethE] [ethF]
: : : : : :
: : : : : :
[eth drv] [eth drv] [ ethsw drv ]
: : : : : : kernel
========================================================================
: : : : : :
hardware
[DPNI] [DPNI] [============= DPSW =================]
| | | | | |
| ---------- | [DPMAC] [DPMAC]
------------------------------- | |
| |
[PHY] [PHY]

You can see it as a hardware-accelerated software bridge where
forwarding rules are managed from the host software partition.


>
>> + * Report only autoneg state, duplexity and speed.
>> + */
>> + if (state.options & DPSW_LINK_OPT_AUTONEG)
>> + link_ksettings->base.autoneg = AUTONEG_ENABLE;
>> + if (!(state.options & DPSW_LINK_OPT_HALF_DUPLEX))
>> + link_ksettings->base.duplex = DUPLEX_FULL;
>> + link_ksettings->base.speed = state.rate;
>> +
>> +out:
>> + return err;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static int
>> +ethsw_set_link_ksettings(struct net_device *netdev,
>> + const struct ethtool_link_ksettings *link_ksettings)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = netdev_priv(netdev);
>> + struct dpsw_link_cfg cfg = {0};
>> + int err = 0;
>> +
>> + netdev_dbg(netdev, "Setting link parameters...");
>> +
>> + /* Due to a temporary MC limitation, the DPSW port must be down
>> + * in order to be able to change link settings. Taking steps to let
>> + * the user know that.
>> + */
>> + if (netif_running(netdev)) {
>> + netdev_info(netdev, "Sorry, interface must be brought down
first.\n");
>> + return -EACCES;
>> + }
>
> This is quite common. The Marvell switches require the port is
> disabled while reconfiguring the port. So we just disable it,
> reconfigure it, and enable it again.
>
> Why are you making the user do this?

There is no strong reason for this, we could just disable the port
behind the scenes.


>
>> +
>> + cfg.rate = link_ksettings->base.speed;
>> + if (link_ksettings->base.autoneg == AUTONEG_ENABLE)
>> + cfg.options |= DPSW_LINK_OPT_AUTONEG;
>> + else
>> + cfg.options &= ~DPSW_LINK_OPT_AUTONEG;
>> + if (link_ksettings->base.duplex == DUPLEX_HALF)
>> + cfg.options |= DPSW_LINK_OPT_HALF_DUPLEX;
>> + else
>> + cfg.options &= ~DPSW_LINK_OPT_HALF_DUPLEX;
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_if_set_link_cfg(port_priv->ethsw_data->mc_io, 0,
>> + port_priv->ethsw_data->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx,
>> + &cfg);
>> + if (err)
>> + /* ethtool will be loud enough if we return an error; no point
>> + * in putting our own error message on the console by default
>> + */
>> + netdev_dbg(netdev, "ERROR %d setting link cfg", err);
>
> Why even bother with a dbg message?
>

True, will remove.


>> +static void ethsw_ethtool_get_stats(struct net_device *netdev,
>> + struct ethtool_stats *stats,
>> + u64 *data)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = netdev_priv(netdev);
>> + int i, err;
>> +
>> + memset(data, 0,
>> + sizeof(u64) * ETHSW_NUM_COUNTERS);
>
> Is this really needed? It seems like the core should be doing this?
>

The ethtool core indeed zeroes the data before calling
get_ethtool_stats. Will remove.


>> +static int ethsw_add_vlan(struct ethsw_core *ethsw, u16 vid)
>> +{
>> + int err;
>> +
>> + struct dpsw_vlan_cfg vcfg = {
>> + .fdb_id = 0,
>> + };
>> +
>> + if (ethsw->vlans[vid]) {
>> + dev_err(ethsw->dev, "VLAN already configured\n");
>> + return -EEXIST;
>> + }
>
> Can this happen? It seems like the core should be preventing this.
>

In regard to the core preventing this, it seems that there are no checks.
The problem here is that the firmware errors out when we add the same
VLAN twice. Other drivers just return 0 in that case.
Can we keep the check but do the same thing?


>> +
>> + err = dpsw_vlan_add(ethsw->mc_io, 0,
>> + ethsw->dpsw_handle, vid, &vcfg);
>> + if (err) {
>> + dev_err(ethsw->dev, "dpsw_vlan_add err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> + ethsw->vlans[vid] = ETHSW_VLAN_MEMBER;
>> +
>> + return 0;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static int ethsw_port_set_pvid(struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv,
u16 pvid)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_core *ethsw = port_priv->ethsw_data;
>> + struct net_device *netdev = port_priv->netdev;
>> + struct dpsw_tci_cfg tci_cfg = { 0 };
>> + bool is_oper;
>> + int err, ret;
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_if_get_tci(ethsw->mc_io, 0, ethsw->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx, &tci_cfg);
>> + if (err) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev, "dpsw_if_get_tci err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> +
>> + tci_cfg.vlan_id = pvid;
>> +
>> + /* Interface needs to be down to change PVID */
>> + is_oper = netif_oper_up(netdev);
>> + if (is_oper) {
>> + err = dpsw_if_disable(ethsw->mc_io, 0,
>> + ethsw->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx);
>> + if (err) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev, "dpsw_if_disable err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> + }
>
> Is this not inconsistent with ethsw_set_link_ksettings()?
>

It's indeed inconsistent. I'll change the ethsw_set_link_ksettings() to
also disable and
re-enable the interface behind the scenes.

>> +
>> + err = dpsw_if_set_tci(ethsw->mc_io, 0, ethsw->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx, &tci_cfg);
>> + if (err) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev, "dpsw_if_set_tci err %d\n", err);
>> + goto set_tci_error;
>> + }
>> +
>> + /* Delete previous PVID info and mark the new one */
>> + port_priv->vlans[port_priv->pvid] &= ~ETHSW_VLAN_PVID;
>> + port_priv->vlans[pvid] |= ETHSW_VLAN_PVID;
>> + port_priv->pvid = pvid;
>> +
>> +set_tci_error:
>> + if (is_oper) {
>> + ret = dpsw_if_enable(ethsw->mc_io, 0,
>> + ethsw->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx);
>> + if (ret) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev, "dpsw_if_enable err %d\n", ret);
>> + return ret;
>> + }
>> + }
>> +
>> + return err;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static int ethsw_set_learning(struct ethsw_core *ethsw, u8 flag)
>> +{
>
> Seems like a bool would be better than u8 for flag. An call it enable?
>

Sure.

>> + enum dpsw_fdb_learning_mode learn_mode;
>> + int err;
>> +
>> + if (flag)
>> + learn_mode = DPSW_FDB_LEARNING_MODE_HW;
>> + else
>> + learn_mode = DPSW_FDB_LEARNING_MODE_DIS;
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_fdb_set_learning_mode(ethsw->mc_io, 0,
ethsw->dpsw_handle, 0,
>> + learn_mode);
>> + if (err) {
>> + dev_err(ethsw->dev, "dpsw_fdb_set_learning_mode err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> + ethsw->learning = !!flag;
>> +
>> + return 0;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static int ethsw_port_set_flood(struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv,
u8 flag)
>> +{
>
> Another bool?
>

Yep, will change.


>> +static int port_fdb_add(struct ndmsg *ndm, struct nlattr *tb[],
>> + struct net_device *dev, const unsigned char *addr,
>> + u16 vid, u16 flags,
>> + struct netlink_ext_ack *extack)
>> +{
>> + if (is_unicast_ether_addr(addr))
>> + return ethsw_port_fdb_add_uc(netdev_priv(dev),
>> + addr);
>> + else
>> + return ethsw_port_fdb_add_mc(netdev_priv(dev),
>> + addr);
>
> Do you need to do anything special with link local MAC addresses?
> Often they are considered as UC addresses.
>

Not at the moment, no. Once we add control traffic support we'll add
default ACL rules
that match on link local addresses and redirect traffic to the control
interface.


>> +static int port_carrier_state_sync(struct net_device *netdev)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = netdev_priv(netdev);
>> + struct dpsw_link_state state;
>> + int err;
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_if_get_link_state(port_priv->ethsw_data->mc_io, 0,
>> + port_priv->ethsw_data->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx, &state);
>> + if (err) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev, "dpsw_if_get_link_state() err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> +
>> + WARN_ONCE(state.up > 1, "Garbage read into link_state");
>> +
>> + if (state.up != port_priv->link_state) {
>> + if (state.up)
>> + netif_carrier_on(netdev);
>> + else
>> + netif_carrier_off(netdev);
>> + port_priv->link_state = state.up;
>> + }
>> + return 0;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static int port_open(struct net_device *netdev)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = netdev_priv(netdev);
>> + int err;
>> +
>> + /* No need to allow Tx as control interface is disabled */
>> + netif_tx_stop_all_queues(netdev);
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_if_enable(port_priv->ethsw_data->mc_io, 0,
>> + port_priv->ethsw_data->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx);
>> + if (err) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev, "dpsw_if_enable err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> +
>> + /* sync carrier state */
>> + err = port_carrier_state_sync(netdev);
>> + if (err) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev,`<
>> + "port_carrier_state_sync err %d\n", err);
>
> port_carrier_state_sync() already does a netdev_err(). There are a lot
> of netdev_err() in this code. I wonder how many are really needed? And
> how often you get a cascade of error message like this?
>
> I think many of them can be downgraded to netdev_dbg(), or removed.
>

I'll do a sweep of the code and remove/downgrade where necessary.


>> + goto err_carrier_sync;
>> + }
>> +
>> + return 0;
>> +
>> +err_carrier_sync:
>> + dpsw_if_disable(port_priv->ethsw_data->mc_io, 0,
>> + port_priv->ethsw_data->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx);
>> + return err;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static int port_stop(struct net_device *netdev)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = netdev_priv(netdev);
>> + int err;
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_if_disable(port_priv->ethsw_data->mc_io, 0,
>> + port_priv->ethsw_data->dpsw_handle,
>> + port_priv->idx);
>> + if (err) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev, "dpsw_if_disable err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> +
>> + return 0;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static netdev_tx_t port_dropframe(struct sk_buff *skb,
>> + struct net_device *netdev)
>> +{
>> + /* we don't support I/O for now, drop the frame */
>> + dev_kfree_skb_any(skb);
>> +
>
> Ah. Does this also mean it cannot receive?
>

Yes, at the moment dpaa2-ethsw does not support either RX nor TX on the
switch ports.

> That makes some of this code pointless and untested.
>
> I'm not sure we would be willing to move this out of staging until it
> can transmit and receive. The whole idea is that switch ports are just
> linux interfaces. Some actions can be accelerated using hardware, and
> what cannot be accelerated the network stack does. However, if you
> cannot receive and transmit, you break that whole model. The network
> stack is mostly pointless.


I get that. I'll first work on adding support for termination.

>
>> +static void ethsw_links_state_update(struct ethsw_core *ethsw)
>> +{
>> + int i;
>> +
>> + for (i = 0; i < ethsw->sw_attr.num_ifs; i++)
>> + port_carrier_state_sync(ethsw->ports[i]->netdev);
>> +}
>> +
>> +static irqreturn_t ethsw_irq0_handler_thread(int irq_num, void *arg)
>> +{
>> + struct device *dev = (struct device *)arg;
>> + struct ethsw_core *ethsw = dev_get_drvdata(dev);
>> +
>> + /* Mask the events and the if_id reserved bits to be cleared on
read */
>> + u32 status = DPSW_IRQ_EVENT_LINK_CHANGED | 0xFFFF0000;
>> + int err;
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_get_irq_status(ethsw->mc_io, 0, ethsw->dpsw_handle,
>> + DPSW_IRQ_INDEX_IF, &status);
>> + if (err) {
>> + dev_err(dev, "Can't get irq status (err %d)", err);
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_clear_irq_status(ethsw->mc_io, 0, ethsw->dpsw_handle,
>> + DPSW_IRQ_INDEX_IF, 0xFFFFFFFF);
>> + if (err)
>> + dev_err(dev, "Can't clear irq status (err %d)", err);
>> + goto out;
>> + }
>> +
>> + if (status & DPSW_IRQ_EVENT_LINK_CHANGED)
>> + ethsw_links_state_update(ethsw);
>
> So there are no per-port events? You have no idea which port went
> up/down, you have to poll them all?
>

Yes, the firmware just notifies that at least one of the links has changed.
We then need to check them all and update if necessary.


>> +
>> +out:
>> + return IRQ_HANDLED;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static int port_lookup_address(struct net_device *netdev, int is_uc,
>> + const unsigned char *addr)
>> +{
>> + struct netdev_hw_addr_list *list = (is_uc) ? &netdev->uc :
&netdev->mc;
>> + struct netdev_hw_addr *ha;
>> +
>> + netif_addr_lock_bh(netdev);
>> + list_for_each_entry(ha, &list->list, list) {
>> + if (ether_addr_equal(ha->addr, addr)) {
>> + netif_addr_unlock_bh(netdev);
>> + return 1;
>> + }
>> + }
>> + netif_addr_unlock_bh(netdev);
>> + return 0;
>
> I know i have shot myself in the foot a few times with this structure
> of returning in the middle of a loop while holding a lock, forgetting
> to unlock, and then later deadlocking. I always do something like:
>
> ret = 0;
> netif_addr_lock_bh(netdev);
> list_for_each_entry(ha, &list->list, list) {
> if (ether_addr_equal(ha->addr, addr)) {
> ret = 1;
> break;
> }
> }
> netif_addr_unlock_bh(netdev);
>
> return ret;
> }

Thanks a lot for the tip, will change.

>
> Also, this function should probably return a bool, not int.
>

Indeed, a bool is more appropriate.

>> +}
>> +
>> +static int port_mdb_add(struct net_device *netdev,
>> + const struct switchdev_obj_port_mdb *mdb,
>> + struct switchdev_trans *trans)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = netdev_priv(netdev);
>> + int err;
>> +
>> + if (switchdev_trans_ph_prepare(trans))
>> + return 0;
>> +
>> + /* Check if address is already set on this port */
>> + if (port_lookup_address(netdev, 0, mdb->addr))
>> + return -EEXIST;
>
> You are looking at core data structures to determine if the address is
> already on the port. Is it possible for the core to ask you to add
> this address, if the core has the information needed to determine
> itself if the port already has the address.
>
> This seems to be a general theme in this code. You don't trust the
> core. If you have real examples of the core doing the wrong thing,
> please point them out.
>

In this specific case, it seems that the core already checks for
duplicates and our check is not needed.
We'll remove.

>> +/* For the moment, only flood setting needs to be updated */
>> +static int port_bridge_join(struct net_device *netdev,
>> + struct net_device *upper_dev)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = netdev_priv(netdev);
>> + struct ethsw_core *ethsw = port_priv->ethsw_data;
>> + int i, err;
>> +
>> + for (i = 0; i < ethsw->sw_attr.num_ifs; i++)
>> + if (ethsw->ports[i]->bridge_dev &&
>> + (ethsw->ports[i]->bridge_dev != upper_dev)) {
>> + netdev_err(netdev,
>> + "Another switch port is connected to %s\n",
>> + ethsw->ports[i]->bridge_dev->name);
>> + return -EINVAL;
>> + }
>
> Am i reading this correct? You only support a single bridge? The
> error message is not very informative. Also, i think you should be
> returning EOPNOTSUPP, indicating the offload is not possible. Linux
> will then do it in software. If it could actually receive/transmit the
> frames....
>

Yes, we only support a single bridge. I'll change the error message to
make it descriptive.
Once we can Rx/Tx on the switch ports the restriction could be lifted.

>> +static int ethsw_open(struct ethsw_core *ethsw)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = NULL;
>> + int i, err;
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_enable(ethsw->mc_io, 0, ethsw->dpsw_handle);
>> + if (err) {
>> + dev_err(ethsw->dev, "dpsw_enable err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> +
>> + for (i = 0; i < ethsw->sw_attr.num_ifs; i++) {
>> + port_priv = ethsw->ports[i];
>> + err = dev_open(port_priv->netdev, NULL);
>> + if (err) {
>> + netdev_err(port_priv->netdev, "dev_open err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> + }
>
> Why is this needed? When the user configures the interface up, won't
> the core call dev_open()?
>

You're indeed right. Only dpsw_enable() is needed on switch probe.
I'll refactor this part.

>> +
>> + return 0;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static int ethsw_stop(struct ethsw_core *ethsw)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv = NULL;
>> + int i, err;
>> +
>> + for (i = 0; i < ethsw->sw_attr.num_ifs; i++) {
>> + port_priv = ethsw->ports[i];
>> + dev_close(port_priv->netdev);
>> + }
>> +
>> + err = dpsw_disable(ethsw->mc_io, 0, ethsw->dpsw_handle);
>> + if (err) {
>> + dev_err(ethsw->dev, "dpsw_disable err %d\n", err);
>> + return err;
>> + }
>> +
>> + return 0;
>> +}
>> +
>> +static int ethsw_init(struct fsl_mc_device *sw_dev)
>> +{
>> + stp_cfg.vlan_id = DEFAULT_VLAN_ID;
>> + stp_cfg.state = DPSW_STP_STATE_FORWARDING;
>> +
>> + for (i = 0; i < ethsw->sw_attr.num_ifs; i++) {
>> + err = dpsw_if_set_stp(ethsw->mc_io, 0, ethsw->dpsw_handle, i,
>> + &stp_cfg);
>
> Maybe you should actually configure the STP state to blocked? You can
> move it to forwarding when the interface is opened.
>

That's probably better. Will try.


>> +static int ethsw_port_init(struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv, u16 port)
>> +{
>> + const char def_mcast[ETH_ALEN] = {0x01, 0x00, 0x5e, 0x00, 0x00, 0x01};
>
> There should be some explanation about what the MAC address is, and
> why it needs adding.
>

It's an IGMP multicast address... but since we do not support
termination there is no need for this entry.
I'll remove it.


>> +static int ethsw_probe_port(struct ethsw_core *ethsw, u16 port_idx)
>> +{
>> + struct ethsw_port_priv *port_priv;
>> + struct device *dev = ethsw->dev;
>> + struct net_device *port_netdev;
>> + int err;
>> +
>> + port_netdev = alloc_etherdev(sizeof(struct ethsw_port_priv));
>> + if (!port_netdev) {
>> + dev_err(dev, "alloc_etherdev error\n");
>> + return -ENOMEM;
>> + }
>> +
>> + port_priv = netdev_priv(port_netdev);
>> + port_priv->netdev = port_netdev;
>> + port_priv->ethsw_data = ethsw;
>> +
>> + port_priv->idx = port_idx;
>> + port_priv->stp_state = BR_STATE_FORWARDING;
>> +
>> + /* Flooding is implicitly enabled */
>> + port_priv->flood = true;
>> +
>> + SET_NETDEV_DEV(port_netdev, dev);
>> + port_netdev->netdev_ops = &ethsw_port_ops;
>> + port_netdev->ethtool_ops = &ethsw_port_ethtool_ops;
>> +
>> + /* Set MTU limits */
>> + port_netdev->min_mtu = ETH_MIN_MTU;
>> + port_netdev->max_mtu = ETHSW_MAX_FRAME_LENGTH;
>> +
>> + err = register_netdev(port_netdev);
>> + if (err < 0) {
>> + dev_err(dev, "register_netdev error %d\n", err);
>> + goto err_register_netdev;
>> + }
>
> At this point, the interface if live.
>
>> +
>> + ethsw->ports[port_idx] = port_priv;
>> +
>> + err = ethsw_port_init(port_priv, port_idx);
>> + if (err)
>> + goto err_ethsw_port_init;
>
> What would happen if the interface was asked to do something before
> these two happen? You should only call register_netdev() when you
> really are ready to go.
>

Indeed the register_netdev call should be after the ethsw_port_init.
A bridge join between these two calls would probably fail.

>> +static int ethsw_probe(struct fsl_mc_device *sw_dev)
>> +{
>> +
>> + /* Switch starts up enabled */
>> + rtnl_lock();
>> + err = ethsw_open(ethsw);
>> + rtnl_unlock();
>
> What exactly do you mean by that?
>
> Andrew
>

I think this is leftover from an earlier version of the driver.

What should be done at probe time is just to enable the switch and each
port is enabled on
dev_open as you suggested. I'll change this.


Thanks a lot for the review, I have some cleanup and also the control
traffic on my TODO list.

Ioana


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-08-11 00:01    [W:0.113 / U:29.768 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site