lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Jun]   [13]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH v4 18/28] docs: convert docs to ReST and rename to *.rst
On Wed, Jun 12, 2019 at 02:52:54PM -0300, Mauro Carvalho Chehab wrote:
> Convert the PM documents to ReST, in order to allow them to
> build with Sphinx.
>
> The conversion is actually:
> - add blank lines and identation in order to identify paragraphs;
> - fix tables markups;
> - add some lists markups;
> - mark literal blocks;
> - adjust title markups.
>
> At its new index.rst, let's add a :orphan: while this is not linked to
> the main index.rst file, in order to avoid build warnings.
>
> Signed-off-by: Mauro Carvalho Chehab <mchehab+samsung@kernel.org>
> Acked-by: Bjorn Helgaas <bhelgaas@google.com>
> Acked-by: Mark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
> ---
> .../ABI/testing/sysfs-class-powercap | 2 +-
> .../admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt | 6 +-
> Documentation/cpu-freq/core.txt | 2 +-
> Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst | 6 +-
> .../driver-api/usb/power-management.rst | 2 +-
> .../power/{apm-acpi.txt => apm-acpi.rst} | 10 +-
> ...m-debugging.txt => basic-pm-debugging.rst} | 79 +--
> ...harger-manager.txt => charger-manager.rst} | 101 ++--
> ...rivers-testing.txt => drivers-testing.rst} | 15 +-
> .../{energy-model.txt => energy-model.rst} | 101 ++--
> ...ing-of-tasks.txt => freezing-of-tasks.rst} | 91 ++--
> Documentation/power/index.rst | 46 ++
> .../power/{interface.txt => interface.rst} | 24 +-
> Documentation/power/{opp.txt => opp.rst} | 175 +++---
> Documentation/power/{pci.txt => pci.rst} | 87 ++-
> ...qos_interface.txt => pm_qos_interface.rst} | 127 +++--
> Documentation/power/power_supply_class.rst | 282 ++++++++++
> Documentation/power/power_supply_class.txt | 231 --------
> Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.rst | 257 +++++++++
> Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.txt | 236 ---------
> .../regulator/{consumer.txt => consumer.rst} | 141 ++---
> .../regulator/{design.txt => design.rst} | 9 +-
> .../regulator/{machine.txt => machine.rst} | 47 +-
> .../regulator/{overview.txt => overview.rst} | 57 +-
> Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.rst | 32 ++
> Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.txt | 30 --
> .../power/{runtime_pm.txt => runtime_pm.rst} | 234 ++++----
> Documentation/power/{s2ram.txt => s2ram.rst} | 20 +-
> ...hotplug.txt => suspend-and-cpuhotplug.rst} | 42 +-
> ...errupts.txt => suspend-and-interrupts.rst} | 2 +
> ...ap-files.txt => swsusp-and-swap-files.rst} | 17 +-
> ...{swsusp-dmcrypt.txt => swsusp-dmcrypt.rst} | 120 ++---
> Documentation/power/swsusp.rst | 501 ++++++++++++++++++
> Documentation/power/swsusp.txt | 446 ----------------
> .../power/{tricks.txt => tricks.rst} | 6 +-
> ...serland-swsusp.txt => userland-swsusp.rst} | 55 +-
> Documentation/power/{video.txt => video.rst} | 156 +++---
> Documentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst | 2 +-
> Documentation/scheduler/sched-energy.txt | 6 +-
> Documentation/trace/coresight-cpu-debug.txt | 2 +-

For the coresight-debug part:

Reviewed-by: Mathieu Poirier <mathieu.poirier@linaro.org>

> .../zh_CN/process/submitting-drivers.rst | 2 +-
> MAINTAINERS | 4 +-
> arch/x86/Kconfig | 2 +-
> drivers/gpu/drm/i915/i915_drv.h | 2 +-
> drivers/opp/Kconfig | 2 +-
> drivers/power/supply/power_supply_core.c | 2 +-
> include/linux/interrupt.h | 2 +-
> include/linux/pci.h | 2 +-
> include/linux/pm.h | 2 +-
> kernel/power/Kconfig | 6 +-
> net/wireless/Kconfig | 2 +-
> 51 files changed, 2126 insertions(+), 1707 deletions(-)
> rename Documentation/power/{apm-acpi.txt => apm-acpi.rst} (87%)
> rename Documentation/power/{basic-pm-debugging.txt => basic-pm-debugging.rst} (87%)
> rename Documentation/power/{charger-manager.txt => charger-manager.rst} (78%)
> rename Documentation/power/{drivers-testing.txt => drivers-testing.rst} (86%)
> rename Documentation/power/{energy-model.txt => energy-model.rst} (74%)
> rename Documentation/power/{freezing-of-tasks.txt => freezing-of-tasks.rst} (75%)
> create mode 100644 Documentation/power/index.rst
> rename Documentation/power/{interface.txt => interface.rst} (84%)
> rename Documentation/power/{opp.txt => opp.rst} (78%)
> rename Documentation/power/{pci.txt => pci.rst} (97%)
> rename Documentation/power/{pm_qos_interface.txt => pm_qos_interface.rst} (62%)
> create mode 100644 Documentation/power/power_supply_class.rst
> delete mode 100644 Documentation/power/power_supply_class.txt
> create mode 100644 Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.rst
> delete mode 100644 Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.txt
> rename Documentation/power/regulator/{consumer.txt => consumer.rst} (61%)
> rename Documentation/power/regulator/{design.txt => design.rst} (86%)
> rename Documentation/power/regulator/{machine.txt => machine.rst} (75%)
> rename Documentation/power/regulator/{overview.txt => overview.rst} (79%)
> create mode 100644 Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.rst
> delete mode 100644 Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.txt
> rename Documentation/power/{runtime_pm.txt => runtime_pm.rst} (89%)
> rename Documentation/power/{s2ram.txt => s2ram.rst} (92%)
> rename Documentation/power/{suspend-and-cpuhotplug.txt => suspend-and-cpuhotplug.rst} (90%)
> rename Documentation/power/{suspend-and-interrupts.txt => suspend-and-interrupts.rst} (98%)
> rename Documentation/power/{swsusp-and-swap-files.txt => swsusp-and-swap-files.rst} (83%)
> rename Documentation/power/{swsusp-dmcrypt.txt => swsusp-dmcrypt.rst} (67%)
> create mode 100644 Documentation/power/swsusp.rst
> delete mode 100644 Documentation/power/swsusp.txt
> rename Documentation/power/{tricks.txt => tricks.rst} (93%)
> rename Documentation/power/{userland-swsusp.txt => userland-swsusp.rst} (85%)
> rename Documentation/power/{video.txt => video.rst} (56%)
>
> diff --git a/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-class-powercap b/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-class-powercap
> index db3b3ff70d84..742dfd966592 100644
> --- a/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-class-powercap
> +++ b/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-class-powercap
> @@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ Contact: linux-pm@vger.kernel.org
> Description:
> The powercap/ class sub directory belongs to the power cap
> subsystem. Refer to
> - Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.txt for details.
> + Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.rst for details.
>
> What: /sys/class/powercap/<control type>
> Date: September 2013
> diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt b/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt
> index c31373f39240..0092a453f7dc 100644
> --- a/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt
> @@ -13,7 +13,7 @@
> For ARM64, ONLY "acpi=off", "acpi=on" or "acpi=force"
> are available
>
> - See also Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt, pci=noacpi
> + See also Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst, pci=noacpi
>
> acpi_apic_instance= [ACPI, IOAPIC]
> Format: <int>
> @@ -223,7 +223,7 @@
> acpi_sleep= [HW,ACPI] Sleep options
> Format: { s3_bios, s3_mode, s3_beep, s4_nohwsig,
> old_ordering, nonvs, sci_force_enable, nobl }
> - See Documentation/power/video.txt for information on
> + See Documentation/power/video.rst for information on
> s3_bios and s3_mode.
> s3_beep is for debugging; it makes the PC's speaker beep
> as soon as the kernel's real-mode entry point is called.
> @@ -4128,7 +4128,7 @@
> Specify the offset from the beginning of the partition
> given by "resume=" at which the swap header is located,
> in <PAGE_SIZE> units (needed only for swap files).
> - See Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.txt
> + See Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.rst
>
> resumedelay= [HIBERNATION] Delay (in seconds) to pause before attempting to
> read the resume files
> diff --git a/Documentation/cpu-freq/core.txt b/Documentation/cpu-freq/core.txt
> index 073f128af5a7..55193e680250 100644
> --- a/Documentation/cpu-freq/core.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/cpu-freq/core.txt
> @@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ flags - flags of the cpufreq driver
>
> 3. CPUFreq Table Generation with Operating Performance Point (OPP)
> ==================================================================
> -For details about OPP, see Documentation/power/opp.txt
> +For details about OPP, see Documentation/power/opp.rst
>
> dev_pm_opp_init_cpufreq_table -
> This function provides a ready to use conversion routine to translate
> diff --git a/Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst b/Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst
> index 30835683616a..f66c7b9126ea 100644
> --- a/Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst
> +++ b/Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst
> @@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ system-wide transition to a sleep state even though its :c:member:`runtime_auto`
> flag is clear.
>
> For more information about the runtime power management framework, refer to
> -:file:`Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt`.
> +:file:`Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst`.
>
>
> Calling Drivers to Enter and Leave System Sleep States
> @@ -728,7 +728,7 @@ it into account in any way.
>
> Devices may be defined as IRQ-safe which indicates to the PM core that their
> runtime PM callbacks may be invoked with disabled interrupts (see
> -:file:`Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt` for more information). If an
> +:file:`Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst` for more information). If an
> IRQ-safe device belongs to a PM domain, the runtime PM of the domain will be
> disallowed, unless the domain itself is defined as IRQ-safe. However, it
> makes sense to define a PM domain as IRQ-safe only if all the devices in it
> @@ -795,7 +795,7 @@ so on) and the final state of the device must reflect the "active" runtime PM
> status in that case.
>
> During system-wide resume from a sleep state it's easiest to put devices into
> -the full-power state, as explained in :file:`Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt`.
> +the full-power state, as explained in :file:`Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst`.
> [Refer to that document for more information regarding this particular issue as
> well as for information on the device runtime power management framework in
> general.]
> diff --git a/Documentation/driver-api/usb/power-management.rst b/Documentation/driver-api/usb/power-management.rst
> index 4a74cf6f2797..2525c3622cae 100644
> --- a/Documentation/driver-api/usb/power-management.rst
> +++ b/Documentation/driver-api/usb/power-management.rst
> @@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ device is turned off while the system as a whole remains running, we
> call it a "dynamic suspend" (also known as a "runtime suspend" or
> "selective suspend"). This document concentrates mostly on how
> dynamic PM is implemented in the USB subsystem, although system PM is
> -covered to some extent (see ``Documentation/power/*.txt`` for more
> +covered to some extent (see ``Documentation/power/*.rst`` for more
> information about system PM).
>
> System PM support is present only if the kernel was built with
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/apm-acpi.txt b/Documentation/power/apm-acpi.rst
> similarity index 87%
> rename from Documentation/power/apm-acpi.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/apm-acpi.rst
> index 6cc423d3662e..5b90d947126d 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/apm-acpi.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/apm-acpi.rst
> @@ -1,5 +1,7 @@
> +============
> APM or ACPI?
> -------------
> +============
> +
> If you have a relatively recent x86 mobile, desktop, or server system,
> odds are it supports either Advanced Power Management (APM) or
> Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI). ACPI is the newer
> @@ -28,5 +30,7 @@ and be sure that they are started sometime in the system boot process.
> Go ahead and start both. If ACPI or APM is not available on your
> system the associated daemon will exit gracefully.
>
> - apmd: http://ftp.debian.org/pool/main/a/apmd/
> - acpid: http://acpid.sf.net/
> + ===== =======================================
> + apmd http://ftp.debian.org/pool/main/a/apmd/
> + acpid http://acpid.sf.net/
> + ===== =======================================
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.txt b/Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.rst
> similarity index 87%
> rename from Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.rst
> index 708f87f78a75..69862e759c30 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.rst
> @@ -1,12 +1,16 @@
> +=================================
> Debugging hibernation and suspend
> +=================================
> +
> (C) 2007 Rafael J. Wysocki <rjw@sisk.pl>, GPL
>
> 1. Testing hibernation (aka suspend to disk or STD)
> +===================================================
>
> -To check if hibernation works, you can try to hibernate in the "reboot" mode:
> +To check if hibernation works, you can try to hibernate in the "reboot" mode::
>
> -# echo reboot > /sys/power/disk
> -# echo disk > /sys/power/state
> + # echo reboot > /sys/power/disk
> + # echo disk > /sys/power/state
>
> and the system should create a hibernation image, reboot, resume and get back to
> the command prompt where you have started the transition. If that happens,
> @@ -15,20 +19,21 @@ test at least a couple of times in a row for confidence. [This is necessary,
> because some problems only show up on a second attempt at suspending and
> resuming the system.] Moreover, hibernating in the "reboot" and "shutdown"
> modes causes the PM core to skip some platform-related callbacks which on ACPI
> -systems might be necessary to make hibernation work. Thus, if your machine fails
> -to hibernate or resume in the "reboot" mode, you should try the "platform" mode:
> +systems might be necessary to make hibernation work. Thus, if your machine
> +fails to hibernate or resume in the "reboot" mode, you should try the
> +"platform" mode::
>
> -# echo platform > /sys/power/disk
> -# echo disk > /sys/power/state
> + # echo platform > /sys/power/disk
> + # echo disk > /sys/power/state
>
> which is the default and recommended mode of hibernation.
>
> Unfortunately, the "platform" mode of hibernation does not work on some systems
> with broken BIOSes. In such cases the "shutdown" mode of hibernation might
> -work:
> +work::
>
> -# echo shutdown > /sys/power/disk
> -# echo disk > /sys/power/state
> + # echo shutdown > /sys/power/disk
> + # echo disk > /sys/power/state
>
> (it is similar to the "reboot" mode, but it requires you to press the power
> button to make the system resume).
> @@ -37,6 +42,7 @@ If neither "platform" nor "shutdown" hibernation mode works, you will need to
> identify what goes wrong.
>
> a) Test modes of hibernation
> +----------------------------
>
> To find out why hibernation fails on your system, you can use a special testing
> facility available if the kernel is compiled with CONFIG_PM_DEBUG set. Then,
> @@ -44,36 +50,38 @@ there is the file /sys/power/pm_test that can be used to make the hibernation
> core run in a test mode. There are 5 test modes available:
>
> freezer
> -- test the freezing of processes
> + - test the freezing of processes
>
> devices
> -- test the freezing of processes and suspending of devices
> + - test the freezing of processes and suspending of devices
>
> platform
> -- test the freezing of processes, suspending of devices and platform
> - global control methods(*)
> + - test the freezing of processes, suspending of devices and platform
> + global control methods [1]_
>
> processors
> -- test the freezing of processes, suspending of devices, platform
> - global control methods(*) and the disabling of nonboot CPUs
> + - test the freezing of processes, suspending of devices, platform
> + global control methods [1]_ and the disabling of nonboot CPUs
>
> core
> -- test the freezing of processes, suspending of devices, platform global
> - control methods(*), the disabling of nonboot CPUs and suspending of
> - platform/system devices
> + - test the freezing of processes, suspending of devices, platform global
> + control methods\ [1]_, the disabling of nonboot CPUs and suspending
> + of platform/system devices
>
> -(*) the platform global control methods are only available on ACPI systems
> +.. [1]
> +
> + the platform global control methods are only available on ACPI systems
> and are only tested if the hibernation mode is set to "platform"
>
> To use one of them it is necessary to write the corresponding string to
> /sys/power/pm_test (eg. "devices" to test the freezing of processes and
> suspending devices) and issue the standard hibernation commands. For example,
> to use the "devices" test mode along with the "platform" mode of hibernation,
> -you should do the following:
> +you should do the following::
>
> -# echo devices > /sys/power/pm_test
> -# echo platform > /sys/power/disk
> -# echo disk > /sys/power/state
> + # echo devices > /sys/power/pm_test
> + # echo platform > /sys/power/disk
> + # echo disk > /sys/power/state
>
> Then, the kernel will try to freeze processes, suspend devices, wait a few
> seconds (5 by default, but configurable by the suspend.pm_test_delay module
> @@ -108,11 +116,12 @@ If the "devices" test fails, most likely there is a driver that cannot suspend
> or resume its device (in the latter case the system may hang or become unstable
> after the test, so please take that into consideration). To find this driver,
> you can carry out a binary search according to the rules:
> +
> - if the test fails, unload a half of the drivers currently loaded and repeat
> -(that would probably involve rebooting the system, so always note what drivers
> -have been loaded before the test),
> + (that would probably involve rebooting the system, so always note what drivers
> + have been loaded before the test),
> - if the test succeeds, load a half of the drivers you have unloaded most
> -recently and repeat.
> + recently and repeat.
>
> Once you have found the failing driver (there can be more than just one of
> them), you have to unload it every time before hibernation. In that case please
> @@ -146,6 +155,7 @@ indicates a serious problem that very well may be related to the hardware, but
> please report it anyway.
>
> b) Testing minimal configuration
> +--------------------------------
>
> If all of the hibernation test modes work, you can boot the system with the
> "init=/bin/bash" command line parameter and attempt to hibernate in the
> @@ -165,14 +175,15 @@ Again, if you find the offending module(s), it(they) must be unloaded every time
> before hibernation, and please report the problem with it(them).
>
> c) Using the "test_resume" hibernation option
> +---------------------------------------------
>
> /sys/power/disk generally tells the kernel what to do after creating a
> hibernation image. One of the available options is "test_resume" which
> causes the just created image to be used for immediate restoration. Namely,
> -after doing:
> +after doing::
>
> -# echo test_resume > /sys/power/disk
> -# echo disk > /sys/power/state
> + # echo test_resume > /sys/power/disk
> + # echo disk > /sys/power/state
>
> a hibernation image will be created and a resume from it will be triggered
> immediately without involving the platform firmware in any way.
> @@ -190,6 +201,7 @@ to resume may be related to the differences between the restore and image
> kernels.
>
> d) Advanced debugging
> +---------------------
>
> In case that hibernation does not work on your system even in the minimal
> configuration and compiling more drivers as modules is not practical or some
> @@ -200,9 +212,10 @@ kernel messages using the serial console. This may provide you with some
> information about the reasons of the suspend (resume) failure. Alternatively,
> it may be possible to use a FireWire port for debugging with firescope
> (http://v3.sk/~lkundrak/firescope/). On x86 it is also possible to
> -use the PM_TRACE mechanism documented in Documentation/power/s2ram.txt .
> +use the PM_TRACE mechanism documented in Documentation/power/s2ram.rst .
>
> 2. Testing suspend to RAM (STR)
> +===============================
>
> To verify that the STR works, it is generally more convenient to use the s2ram
> tool available from http://suspend.sf.net and documented at
> @@ -230,7 +243,8 @@ you will have to unload them every time before an STR transition (ie. before
> you run s2ram), and please report the problems with them.
>
> There is a debugfs entry which shows the suspend to RAM statistics. Here is an
> -example of its output.
> +example of its output::
> +
> # mount -t debugfs none /sys/kernel/debug
> # cat /sys/kernel/debug/suspend_stats
> success: 20
> @@ -248,6 +262,7 @@ example of its output.
> -16
> last_failed_step: suspend
> suspend
> +
> Field success means the success number of suspend to RAM, and field fail means
> the failure number. Others are the failure number of different steps of suspend
> to RAM. suspend_stats just lists the last 2 failed devices, error number and
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/charger-manager.txt b/Documentation/power/charger-manager.rst
> similarity index 78%
> rename from Documentation/power/charger-manager.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/charger-manager.rst
> index 9ff1105e58d6..84fab9376792 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/charger-manager.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/charger-manager.rst
> @@ -1,4 +1,7 @@
> +===============
> Charger Manager
> +===============
> +
> (C) 2011 MyungJoo Ham <myungjoo.ham@samsung.com>, GPL
>
> Charger Manager provides in-kernel battery charger management that
> @@ -55,41 +58,39 @@ Charger Manager supports the following:
> notification to users with UEVENT.
>
> 2. Global Charger-Manager Data related with suspend_again
> -========================================================
> +=========================================================
> In order to setup Charger Manager with suspend-again feature
> (in-suspend monitoring), the user should provide charger_global_desc
> -with setup_charger_manager(struct charger_global_desc *).
> +with setup_charger_manager(`struct charger_global_desc *`).
> This charger_global_desc data for in-suspend monitoring is global
> as the name suggests. Thus, the user needs to provide only once even
> if there are multiple batteries. If there are multiple batteries, the
> multiple instances of Charger Manager share the same charger_global_desc
> and it will manage in-suspend monitoring for all instances of Charger Manager.
>
> -The user needs to provide all the three entries properly in order to activate
> -in-suspend monitoring:
> +The user needs to provide all the three entries to `struct charger_global_desc`
> +properly in order to activate in-suspend monitoring:
>
> -struct charger_global_desc {
> -
> -char *rtc_name;
> - : The name of rtc (e.g., "rtc0") used to wakeup the system from
> +`char *rtc_name;`
> + The name of rtc (e.g., "rtc0") used to wakeup the system from
> suspend for Charger Manager. The alarm interrupt (AIE) of the rtc
> should be able to wake up the system from suspend. Charger Manager
> saves and restores the alarm value and use the previously-defined
> alarm if it is going to go off earlier than Charger Manager so that
> Charger Manager does not interfere with previously-defined alarms.
>
> -bool (*rtc_only_wakeup)(void);
> - : This callback should let CM know whether
> +`bool (*rtc_only_wakeup)(void);`
> + This callback should let CM know whether
> the wakeup-from-suspend is caused only by the alarm of "rtc" in the
> same struct. If there is any other wakeup source triggered the
> wakeup, it should return false. If the "rtc" is the only wakeup
> reason, it should return true.
>
> -bool assume_timer_stops_in_suspend;
> - : if true, Charger Manager assumes that
> +`bool assume_timer_stops_in_suspend;`
> + if true, Charger Manager assumes that
> the timer (CM uses jiffies as timer) stops during suspend. Then, CM
> assumes that the suspend-duration is same as the alarm length.
> -};
> +
>
> 3. How to setup suspend_again
> =============================
> @@ -109,26 +110,28 @@ if the system was woken up by Charger Manager and the polling
> =============================================
> For each battery charged independently from other batteries (if a series of
> batteries are charged by a single charger, they are counted as one independent
> -battery), an instance of Charger Manager is attached to it.
> +battery), an instance of Charger Manager is attached to it. The following
>
> -struct charger_desc {
> +struct charger_desc elements:
>
> -char *psy_name;
> - : The power-supply-class name of the battery. Default is
> +`char *psy_name;`
> + The power-supply-class name of the battery. Default is
> "battery" if psy_name is NULL. Users can access the psy entries
> at "/sys/class/power_supply/[psy_name]/".
>
> -enum polling_modes polling_mode;
> - : CM_POLL_DISABLE: do not poll this battery.
> - CM_POLL_ALWAYS: always poll this battery.
> - CM_POLL_EXTERNAL_POWER_ONLY: poll this battery if and only if
> - an external power source is attached.
> - CM_POLL_CHARGING_ONLY: poll this battery if and only if the
> - battery is being charged.
> +`enum polling_modes polling_mode;`
> + CM_POLL_DISABLE:
> + do not poll this battery.
> + CM_POLL_ALWAYS:
> + always poll this battery.
> + CM_POLL_EXTERNAL_POWER_ONLY:
> + poll this battery if and only if an external power
> + source is attached.
> + CM_POLL_CHARGING_ONLY:
> + poll this battery if and only if the battery is being charged.
>
> -unsigned int fullbatt_vchkdrop_ms;
> -unsigned int fullbatt_vchkdrop_uV;
> - : If both have non-zero values, Charger Manager will check the
> +`unsigned int fullbatt_vchkdrop_ms; / unsigned int fullbatt_vchkdrop_uV;`
> + If both have non-zero values, Charger Manager will check the
> battery voltage drop fullbatt_vchkdrop_ms after the battery is fully
> charged. If the voltage drop is over fullbatt_vchkdrop_uV, Charger
> Manager will try to recharge the battery by disabling and enabling
> @@ -136,50 +139,52 @@ unsigned int fullbatt_vchkdrop_uV;
> condition) is needed to be implemented with hardware interrupts from
> fuel gauges or charger devices/chips.
>
> -unsigned int fullbatt_uV;
> - : If specified with a non-zero value, Charger Manager assumes
> +`unsigned int fullbatt_uV;`
> + If specified with a non-zero value, Charger Manager assumes
> that the battery is full (capacity = 100) if the battery is not being
> charged and the battery voltage is equal to or greater than
> fullbatt_uV.
>
> -unsigned int polling_interval_ms;
> - : Required polling interval in ms. Charger Manager will poll
> +`unsigned int polling_interval_ms;`
> + Required polling interval in ms. Charger Manager will poll
> this battery every polling_interval_ms or more frequently.
>
> -enum data_source battery_present;
> - : CM_BATTERY_PRESENT: assume that the battery exists.
> - CM_NO_BATTERY: assume that the battery does not exists.
> - CM_FUEL_GAUGE: get battery presence information from fuel gauge.
> - CM_CHARGER_STAT: get battery presence from chargers.
> +`enum data_source battery_present;`
> + CM_BATTERY_PRESENT:
> + assume that the battery exists.
> + CM_NO_BATTERY:
> + assume that the battery does not exists.
> + CM_FUEL_GAUGE:
> + get battery presence information from fuel gauge.
> + CM_CHARGER_STAT:
> + get battery presence from chargers.
>
> -char **psy_charger_stat;
> - : An array ending with NULL that has power-supply-class names of
> +`char **psy_charger_stat;`
> + An array ending with NULL that has power-supply-class names of
> chargers. Each power-supply-class should provide "PRESENT" (if
> battery_present is "CM_CHARGER_STAT"), "ONLINE" (shows whether an
> external power source is attached or not), and "STATUS" (shows whether
> the battery is {"FULL" or not FULL} or {"FULL", "Charging",
> "Discharging", "NotCharging"}).
>
> -int num_charger_regulators;
> -struct regulator_bulk_data *charger_regulators;
> - : Regulators representing the chargers in the form for
> +`int num_charger_regulators; / struct regulator_bulk_data *charger_regulators;`
> + Regulators representing the chargers in the form for
> regulator framework's bulk functions.
>
> -char *psy_fuel_gauge;
> - : Power-supply-class name of the fuel gauge.
> +`char *psy_fuel_gauge;`
> + Power-supply-class name of the fuel gauge.
>
> -int (*temperature_out_of_range)(int *mC);
> -bool measure_battery_temp;
> - : This callback returns 0 if the temperature is safe for charging,
> +`int (*temperature_out_of_range)(int *mC); / bool measure_battery_temp;`
> + This callback returns 0 if the temperature is safe for charging,
> a positive number if it is too hot to charge, and a negative number
> if it is too cold to charge. With the variable mC, the callback returns
> the temperature in 1/1000 of centigrade.
> The source of temperature can be battery or ambient one according to
> the value of measure_battery_temp.
> -};
> +
>
> 5. Notify Charger-Manager of charger events: cm_notify_event()
> -=========================================================
> +==============================================================
> If there is an charger event is required to notify
> Charger Manager, a charger device driver that triggers the event can call
> cm_notify_event(psy, type, msg) to notify the corresponding Charger Manager.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/drivers-testing.txt b/Documentation/power/drivers-testing.rst
> similarity index 86%
> rename from Documentation/power/drivers-testing.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/drivers-testing.rst
> index 638afdf4d6b8..e53f1999fc39 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/drivers-testing.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/drivers-testing.rst
> @@ -1,7 +1,11 @@
> +====================================================
> Testing suspend and resume support in device drivers
> +====================================================
> +
> (C) 2007 Rafael J. Wysocki <rjw@sisk.pl>, GPL
>
> 1. Preparing the test system
> +============================
>
> Unfortunately, to effectively test the support for the system-wide suspend and
> resume transitions in a driver, it is necessary to suspend and resume a fully
> @@ -14,19 +18,20 @@ the machine's BIOS.
> Of course, for this purpose the test system has to be known to suspend and
> resume without the driver being tested. Thus, if possible, you should first
> resolve all suspend/resume-related problems in the test system before you start
> -testing the new driver. Please see Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.txt
> +testing the new driver. Please see Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.rst
> for more information about the debugging of suspend/resume functionality.
>
> 2. Testing the driver
> +=====================
>
> Once you have resolved the suspend/resume-related problems with your test system
> without the new driver, you are ready to test it:
>
> a) Build the driver as a module, load it and try the test modes of hibernation
> - (see: Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.txt, 1).
> + (see: Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.rst, 1).
>
> b) Load the driver and attempt to hibernate in the "reboot", "shutdown" and
> - "platform" modes (see: Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.txt, 1).
> + "platform" modes (see: Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.rst, 1).
>
> c) Compile the driver directly into the kernel and try the test modes of
> hibernation.
> @@ -34,12 +39,12 @@ c) Compile the driver directly into the kernel and try the test modes of
> d) Attempt to hibernate with the driver compiled directly into the kernel
> in the "reboot", "shutdown" and "platform" modes.
>
> -e) Try the test modes of suspend (see: Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.txt,
> +e) Try the test modes of suspend (see: Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.rst,
> 2). [As far as the STR tests are concerned, it should not matter whether or
> not the driver is built as a module.]
>
> f) Attempt to suspend to RAM using the s2ram tool with the driver loaded
> - (see: Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.txt, 2).
> + (see: Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.rst, 2).
>
> Each of the above tests should be repeated several times and the STD tests
> should be mixed with the STR tests. If any of them fails, the driver cannot be
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/energy-model.txt b/Documentation/power/energy-model.rst
> similarity index 74%
> rename from Documentation/power/energy-model.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/energy-model.rst
> index a2b0ae4c76bd..90a345d57ae9 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/energy-model.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/energy-model.rst
> @@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
> - ====================
> - Energy Model of CPUs
> - ====================
> +====================
> +Energy Model of CPUs
> +====================
>
> 1. Overview
> -----------
> @@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ kernel, hence enabling to avoid redundant work.
>
> The figure below depicts an example of drivers (Arm-specific here, but the
> approach is applicable to any architecture) providing power costs to the EM
> -framework, and interested clients reading the data from it.
> +framework, and interested clients reading the data from it::
>
> +---------------+ +-----------------+ +---------------+
> | Thermal (IPA) | | Scheduler (EAS) | | Other |
> @@ -58,15 +58,17 @@ micro-architectures.
> 2. Core APIs
> ------------
>
> - 2.1 Config options
> +2.1 Config options
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> CONFIG_ENERGY_MODEL must be enabled to use the EM framework.
>
>
> - 2.2 Registration of performance domains
> +2.2 Registration of performance domains
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> Drivers are expected to register performance domains into the EM framework by
> -calling the following API:
> +calling the following API::
>
> int em_register_perf_domain(cpumask_t *span, unsigned int nr_states,
> struct em_data_callback *cb);
> @@ -80,7 +82,8 @@ callback, and kernel/power/energy_model.c for further documentation on this
> API.
>
>
> - 2.3 Accessing performance domains
> +2.3 Accessing performance domains
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> Subsystems interested in the energy model of a CPU can retrieve it using the
> em_cpu_get() API. The energy model tables are allocated once upon creation of
> @@ -99,46 +102,46 @@ More details about the above APIs can be found in include/linux/energy_model.h.
> This section provides a simple example of a CPUFreq driver registering a
> performance domain in the Energy Model framework using the (fake) 'foo'
> protocol. The driver implements an est_power() function to be provided to the
> -EM framework.
> +EM framework::
>
> - -> drivers/cpufreq/foo_cpufreq.c
> + -> drivers/cpufreq/foo_cpufreq.c
>
> -01 static int est_power(unsigned long *mW, unsigned long *KHz, int cpu)
> -02 {
> -03 long freq, power;
> -04
> -05 /* Use the 'foo' protocol to ceil the frequency */
> -06 freq = foo_get_freq_ceil(cpu, *KHz);
> -07 if (freq < 0);
> -08 return freq;
> -09
> -10 /* Estimate the power cost for the CPU at the relevant freq. */
> -11 power = foo_estimate_power(cpu, freq);
> -12 if (power < 0);
> -13 return power;
> -14
> -15 /* Return the values to the EM framework */
> -16 *mW = power;
> -17 *KHz = freq;
> -18
> -19 return 0;
> -20 }
> -21
> -22 static int foo_cpufreq_init(struct cpufreq_policy *policy)
> -23 {
> -24 struct em_data_callback em_cb = EM_DATA_CB(est_power);
> -25 int nr_opp, ret;
> -26
> -27 /* Do the actual CPUFreq init work ... */
> -28 ret = do_foo_cpufreq_init(policy);
> -29 if (ret)
> -30 return ret;
> -31
> -32 /* Find the number of OPPs for this policy */
> -33 nr_opp = foo_get_nr_opp(policy);
> -34
> -35 /* And register the new performance domain */
> -36 em_register_perf_domain(policy->cpus, nr_opp, &em_cb);
> -37
> -38 return 0;
> -39 }
> + 01 static int est_power(unsigned long *mW, unsigned long *KHz, int cpu)
> + 02 {
> + 03 long freq, power;
> + 04
> + 05 /* Use the 'foo' protocol to ceil the frequency */
> + 06 freq = foo_get_freq_ceil(cpu, *KHz);
> + 07 if (freq < 0);
> + 08 return freq;
> + 09
> + 10 /* Estimate the power cost for the CPU at the relevant freq. */
> + 11 power = foo_estimate_power(cpu, freq);
> + 12 if (power < 0);
> + 13 return power;
> + 14
> + 15 /* Return the values to the EM framework */
> + 16 *mW = power;
> + 17 *KHz = freq;
> + 18
> + 19 return 0;
> + 20 }
> + 21
> + 22 static int foo_cpufreq_init(struct cpufreq_policy *policy)
> + 23 {
> + 24 struct em_data_callback em_cb = EM_DATA_CB(est_power);
> + 25 int nr_opp, ret;
> + 26
> + 27 /* Do the actual CPUFreq init work ... */
> + 28 ret = do_foo_cpufreq_init(policy);
> + 29 if (ret)
> + 30 return ret;
> + 31
> + 32 /* Find the number of OPPs for this policy */
> + 33 nr_opp = foo_get_nr_opp(policy);
> + 34
> + 35 /* And register the new performance domain */
> + 36 em_register_perf_domain(policy->cpus, nr_opp, &em_cb);
> + 37
> + 38 return 0;
> + 39 }
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/freezing-of-tasks.txt b/Documentation/power/freezing-of-tasks.rst
> similarity index 75%
> rename from Documentation/power/freezing-of-tasks.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/freezing-of-tasks.rst
> index cd283190855a..ef110fe55e82 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/freezing-of-tasks.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/freezing-of-tasks.rst
> @@ -1,13 +1,18 @@
> +=================
> Freezing of tasks
> - (C) 2007 Rafael J. Wysocki <rjw@sisk.pl>, GPL
> +=================
> +
> +(C) 2007 Rafael J. Wysocki <rjw@sisk.pl>, GPL
>
> I. What is the freezing of tasks?
> +=================================
>
> The freezing of tasks is a mechanism by which user space processes and some
> kernel threads are controlled during hibernation or system-wide suspend (on some
> architectures).
>
> II. How does it work?
> +=====================
>
> There are three per-task flags used for that, PF_NOFREEZE, PF_FROZEN
> and PF_FREEZER_SKIP (the last one is auxiliary). The tasks that have
> @@ -41,7 +46,7 @@ explicitly in suitable places or use the wait_event_freezable() or
> wait_event_freezable_timeout() macros (defined in include/linux/freezer.h)
> that combine interruptible sleep with checking if the task is to be frozen and
> calling try_to_freeze(). The main loop of a freezable kernel thread may look
> -like the following one:
> +like the following one::
>
> set_freezable();
> do {
> @@ -65,7 +70,7 @@ order to clear the PF_FROZEN flag for each frozen task. Then, the tasks that
> have been frozen leave __refrigerator() and continue running.
>
>
> -Rationale behind the functions dealing with freezing and thawing of tasks:
> +Rationale behind the functions dealing with freezing and thawing of tasks
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> freeze_processes():
> @@ -86,6 +91,7 @@ thaw_processes():
>
>
> III. Which kernel threads are freezable?
> +========================================
>
> Kernel threads are not freezable by default. However, a kernel thread may clear
> PF_NOFREEZE for itself by calling set_freezable() (the resetting of PF_NOFREEZE
> @@ -93,37 +99,39 @@ directly is not allowed). From this point it is regarded as freezable
> and must call try_to_freeze() in a suitable place.
>
> IV. Why do we do that?
> +======================
>
> Generally speaking, there is a couple of reasons to use the freezing of tasks:
>
> 1. The principal reason is to prevent filesystems from being damaged after
> -hibernation. At the moment we have no simple means of checkpointing
> -filesystems, so if there are any modifications made to filesystem data and/or
> -metadata on disks, we cannot bring them back to the state from before the
> -modifications. At the same time each hibernation image contains some
> -filesystem-related information that must be consistent with the state of the
> -on-disk data and metadata after the system memory state has been restored from
> -the image (otherwise the filesystems will be damaged in a nasty way, usually
> -making them almost impossible to repair). We therefore freeze tasks that might
> -cause the on-disk filesystems' data and metadata to be modified after the
> -hibernation image has been created and before the system is finally powered off.
> -The majority of these are user space processes, but if any of the kernel threads
> -may cause something like this to happen, they have to be freezable.
> + hibernation. At the moment we have no simple means of checkpointing
> + filesystems, so if there are any modifications made to filesystem data and/or
> + metadata on disks, we cannot bring them back to the state from before the
> + modifications. At the same time each hibernation image contains some
> + filesystem-related information that must be consistent with the state of the
> + on-disk data and metadata after the system memory state has been restored
> + from the image (otherwise the filesystems will be damaged in a nasty way,
> + usually making them almost impossible to repair). We therefore freeze
> + tasks that might cause the on-disk filesystems' data and metadata to be
> + modified after the hibernation image has been created and before the
> + system is finally powered off. The majority of these are user space
> + processes, but if any of the kernel threads may cause something like this
> + to happen, they have to be freezable.
>
> 2. Next, to create the hibernation image we need to free a sufficient amount of
> -memory (approximately 50% of available RAM) and we need to do that before
> -devices are deactivated, because we generally need them for swapping out. Then,
> -after the memory for the image has been freed, we don't want tasks to allocate
> -additional memory and we prevent them from doing that by freezing them earlier.
> -[Of course, this also means that device drivers should not allocate substantial
> -amounts of memory from their .suspend() callbacks before hibernation, but this
> -is a separate issue.]
> + memory (approximately 50% of available RAM) and we need to do that before
> + devices are deactivated, because we generally need them for swapping out.
> + Then, after the memory for the image has been freed, we don't want tasks
> + to allocate additional memory and we prevent them from doing that by
> + freezing them earlier. [Of course, this also means that device drivers
> + should not allocate substantial amounts of memory from their .suspend()
> + callbacks before hibernation, but this is a separate issue.]
>
> 3. The third reason is to prevent user space processes and some kernel threads
> -from interfering with the suspending and resuming of devices. A user space
> -process running on a second CPU while we are suspending devices may, for
> -example, be troublesome and without the freezing of tasks we would need some
> -safeguards against race conditions that might occur in such a case.
> + from interfering with the suspending and resuming of devices. A user space
> + process running on a second CPU while we are suspending devices may, for
> + example, be troublesome and without the freezing of tasks we would need some
> + safeguards against race conditions that might occur in such a case.
>
> Although Linus Torvalds doesn't like the freezing of tasks, he said this in one
> of the discussions on LKML (http://lkml.org/lkml/2007/4/27/608):
> @@ -132,7 +140,7 @@ of the discussions on LKML (http://lkml.org/lkml/2007/4/27/608):
>
> Linus: In many ways, 'at all'.
>
> -I _do_ realize the IO request queue issues, and that we cannot actually do
> +I **do** realize the IO request queue issues, and that we cannot actually do
> s2ram with some devices in the middle of a DMA. So we want to be able to
> avoid *that*, there's no question about that. And I suspect that stopping
> user threads and then waiting for a sync is practically one of the easier
> @@ -150,17 +158,18 @@ thawed after the driver's .resume() callback has run, so it won't be accessing
> the device while it's suspended.
>
> 4. Another reason for freezing tasks is to prevent user space processes from
> -realizing that hibernation (or suspend) operation takes place. Ideally, user
> -space processes should not notice that such a system-wide operation has occurred
> -and should continue running without any problems after the restore (or resume
> -from suspend). Unfortunately, in the most general case this is quite difficult
> -to achieve without the freezing of tasks. Consider, for example, a process
> -that depends on all CPUs being online while it's running. Since we need to
> -disable nonboot CPUs during the hibernation, if this process is not frozen, it
> -may notice that the number of CPUs has changed and may start to work incorrectly
> -because of that.
> + realizing that hibernation (or suspend) operation takes place. Ideally, user
> + space processes should not notice that such a system-wide operation has
> + occurred and should continue running without any problems after the restore
> + (or resume from suspend). Unfortunately, in the most general case this
> + is quite difficult to achieve without the freezing of tasks. Consider,
> + for example, a process that depends on all CPUs being online while it's
> + running. Since we need to disable nonboot CPUs during the hibernation,
> + if this process is not frozen, it may notice that the number of CPUs has
> + changed and may start to work incorrectly because of that.
>
> V. Are there any problems related to the freezing of tasks?
> +===========================================================
>
> Yes, there are.
>
> @@ -172,11 +181,12 @@ may be undesirable. That's why kernel threads are not freezable by default.
>
> Second, there are the following two problems related to the freezing of user
> space processes:
> +
> 1. Putting processes into an uninterruptible sleep distorts the load average.
> 2. Now that we have FUSE, plus the framework for doing device drivers in
> -userspace, it gets even more complicated because some userspace processes are
> -now doing the sorts of things that kernel threads do
> -(https://lists.linux-foundation.org/pipermail/linux-pm/2007-May/012309.html).
> + userspace, it gets even more complicated because some userspace processes are
> + now doing the sorts of things that kernel threads do
> + (https://lists.linux-foundation.org/pipermail/linux-pm/2007-May/012309.html).
>
> The problem 1. seems to be fixable, although it hasn't been fixed so far. The
> other one is more serious, but it seems that we can work around it by using
> @@ -201,6 +211,7 @@ requested early enough using the suspend notifier API described in
> Documentation/driver-api/pm/notifiers.rst.
>
> VI. Are there any precautions to be taken to prevent freezing failures?
> +=======================================================================
>
> Yes, there are.
>
> @@ -226,6 +237,8 @@ So, to summarize, use [un]lock_system_sleep() instead of directly using
> mutex_[un]lock(&system_transition_mutex). That would prevent freezing failures.
>
> V. Miscellaneous
> +================
> +
> /sys/power/pm_freeze_timeout controls how long it will cost at most to freeze
> all user space processes or all freezable kernel threads, in unit of millisecond.
> The default value is 20000, with range of unsigned integer.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/index.rst b/Documentation/power/index.rst
> new file mode 100644
> index 000000000000..20415f21e48a
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/Documentation/power/index.rst
> @@ -0,0 +1,46 @@
> +:orphan:
> +
> +================
> +Power Management
> +================
> +
> +.. toctree::
> + :maxdepth: 1
> +
> + apm-acpi
> + basic-pm-debugging
> + charger-manager
> + drivers-testing
> + energy-model
> + freezing-of-tasks
> + interface
> + opp
> + pci
> + pm_qos_interface
> + power_supply_class
> + runtime_pm
> + s2ram
> + suspend-and-cpuhotplug
> + suspend-and-interrupts
> + swsusp-and-swap-files
> + swsusp-dmcrypt
> + swsusp
> + video
> + tricks
> +
> + userland-swsusp
> +
> + powercap/powercap
> +
> + regulator/consumer
> + regulator/design
> + regulator/machine
> + regulator/overview
> + regulator/regulator
> +
> +.. only:: subproject and html
> +
> + Indices
> + =======
> +
> + * :ref:`genindex`
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/interface.txt b/Documentation/power/interface.rst
> similarity index 84%
> rename from Documentation/power/interface.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/interface.rst
> index 27df7f98668a..8d270ed27228 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/interface.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/interface.rst
> @@ -1,4 +1,6 @@
> +===========================================
> Power Management Interface for System Sleep
> +===========================================
>
> Copyright (c) 2016 Intel Corp., Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
>
> @@ -11,10 +13,10 @@ mounted at /sys).
>
> Reading from it returns a list of supported sleep states, encoded as:
>
> -'freeze' (Suspend-to-Idle)
> -'standby' (Power-On Suspend)
> -'mem' (Suspend-to-RAM)
> -'disk' (Suspend-to-Disk)
> +- 'freeze' (Suspend-to-Idle)
> +- 'standby' (Power-On Suspend)
> +- 'mem' (Suspend-to-RAM)
> +- 'disk' (Suspend-to-Disk)
>
> Suspend-to-Idle is always supported. Suspend-to-Disk is always supported
> too as long the kernel has been configured to support hibernation at all
> @@ -32,18 +34,18 @@ Specifically, it tells the kernel what to do after creating a hibernation image.
>
> Reading from it returns a list of supported options encoded as:
>
> -'platform' (put the system into sleep using a platform-provided method)
> -'shutdown' (shut the system down)
> -'reboot' (reboot the system)
> -'suspend' (trigger a Suspend-to-RAM transition)
> -'test_resume' (resume-after-hibernation test mode)
> +- 'platform' (put the system into sleep using a platform-provided method)
> +- 'shutdown' (shut the system down)
> +- 'reboot' (reboot the system)
> +- 'suspend' (trigger a Suspend-to-RAM transition)
> +- 'test_resume' (resume-after-hibernation test mode)
>
> The currently selected option is printed in square brackets.
>
> The 'platform' option is only available if the platform provides a special
> mechanism to put the system to sleep after creating a hibernation image (ACPI
> does that, for example). The 'suspend' option is available if Suspend-to-RAM
> -is supported. Refer to Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.txt for the
> +is supported. Refer to Documentation/power/basic-pm-debugging.rst for the
> description of the 'test_resume' option.
>
> To select an option, write the string representing it to /sys/power/disk.
> @@ -71,7 +73,7 @@ If /sys/power/pm_trace contains '1', the fingerprint of each suspend/resume
> event point in turn will be stored in the RTC memory (overwriting the actual
> RTC information), so it will survive a system crash if one occurs right after
> storing it and it can be used later to identify the driver that caused the crash
> -to happen (see Documentation/power/s2ram.txt for more information).
> +to happen (see Documentation/power/s2ram.rst for more information).
>
> Initially it contains '0' which may be changed to '1' by writing a string
> representing a nonzero integer into it.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/opp.txt b/Documentation/power/opp.rst
> similarity index 78%
> rename from Documentation/power/opp.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/opp.rst
> index 0c007e250cd1..b3cf1def9dee 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/opp.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/opp.rst
> @@ -1,20 +1,23 @@
> +==========================================
> Operating Performance Points (OPP) Library
> ==========================================
>
> (C) 2009-2010 Nishanth Menon <nm@ti.com>, Texas Instruments Incorporated
>
> -Contents
> ---------
> -1. Introduction
> -2. Initial OPP List Registration
> -3. OPP Search Functions
> -4. OPP Availability Control Functions
> -5. OPP Data Retrieval Functions
> -6. Data Structures
> +.. Contents
> +
> + 1. Introduction
> + 2. Initial OPP List Registration
> + 3. OPP Search Functions
> + 4. OPP Availability Control Functions
> + 5. OPP Data Retrieval Functions
> + 6. Data Structures
>
> 1. Introduction
> ===============
> +
> 1.1 What is an Operating Performance Point (OPP)?
> +-------------------------------------------------
>
> Complex SoCs of today consists of a multiple sub-modules working in conjunction.
> In an operational system executing varied use cases, not all modules in the SoC
> @@ -28,16 +31,19 @@ the device will support per domain are called Operating Performance Points or
> OPPs.
>
> As an example:
> +
> Let us consider an MPU device which supports the following:
> {300MHz at minimum voltage of 1V}, {800MHz at minimum voltage of 1.2V},
> {1GHz at minimum voltage of 1.3V}
>
> We can represent these as three OPPs as the following {Hz, uV} tuples:
> -{300000000, 1000000}
> -{800000000, 1200000}
> -{1000000000, 1300000}
> +
> +- {300000000, 1000000}
> +- {800000000, 1200000}
> +- {1000000000, 1300000}
>
> 1.2 Operating Performance Points Library
> +----------------------------------------
>
> OPP library provides a set of helper functions to organize and query the OPP
> information. The library is located in drivers/base/power/opp.c and the header
> @@ -46,9 +52,10 @@ CONFIG_PM_OPP from power management menuconfig menu. OPP library depends on
> CONFIG_PM as certain SoCs such as Texas Instrument's OMAP framework allows to
> optionally boot at a certain OPP without needing cpufreq.
>
> -Typical usage of the OPP library is as follows:
> -(users) -> registers a set of default OPPs -> (library)
> -SoC framework -> modifies on required cases certain OPPs -> OPP layer
> +Typical usage of the OPP library is as follows::
> +
> + (users) -> registers a set of default OPPs -> (library)
> + SoC framework -> modifies on required cases certain OPPs -> OPP layer
> -> queries to search/retrieve information ->
>
> OPP layer expects each domain to be represented by a unique device pointer. SoC
> @@ -57,8 +64,9 @@ list is expected to be an optimally small number typically around 5 per device.
> This initial list contains a set of OPPs that the framework expects to be safely
> enabled by default in the system.
>
> -Note on OPP Availability:
> -------------------------
> +Note on OPP Availability
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
> +
> As the system proceeds to operate, SoC framework may choose to make certain
> OPPs available or not available on each device based on various external
> factors. Example usage: Thermal management or other exceptional situations where
> @@ -88,7 +96,8 @@ registering the OPPs is maintained by OPP library throughout the device
> operation. The SoC framework can subsequently control the availability of the
> OPPs dynamically using the dev_pm_opp_enable / disable functions.
>
> -dev_pm_opp_add - Add a new OPP for a specific domain represented by the device pointer.
> +dev_pm_opp_add
> + Add a new OPP for a specific domain represented by the device pointer.
> The OPP is defined using the frequency and voltage. Once added, the OPP
> is assumed to be available and control of it's availability can be done
> with the dev_pm_opp_enable/disable functions. OPP library internally stores
> @@ -96,9 +105,11 @@ dev_pm_opp_add - Add a new OPP for a specific domain represented by the device p
> used by SoC framework to define a optimal list as per the demands of
> SoC usage environment.
>
> - WARNING: Do not use this function in interrupt context.
> + WARNING:
> + Do not use this function in interrupt context.
> +
> + Example::
>
> - Example:
> soc_pm_init()
> {
> /* Do things */
> @@ -125,12 +136,15 @@ Callers of these functions shall call dev_pm_opp_put() after they have used the
> OPP. Otherwise the memory for the OPP will never get freed and result in
> memleak.
>
> -dev_pm_opp_find_freq_exact - Search for an OPP based on an *exact* frequency and
> +dev_pm_opp_find_freq_exact
> + Search for an OPP based on an *exact* frequency and
> availability. This function is especially useful to enable an OPP which
> is not available by default.
> Example: In a case when SoC framework detects a situation where a
> higher frequency could be made available, it can use this function to
> - find the OPP prior to call the dev_pm_opp_enable to actually make it available.
> + find the OPP prior to call the dev_pm_opp_enable to actually make
> + it available::
> +
> opp = dev_pm_opp_find_freq_exact(dev, 1000000000, false);
> dev_pm_opp_put(opp);
> /* dont operate on the pointer.. just do a sanity check.. */
> @@ -141,27 +155,34 @@ dev_pm_opp_find_freq_exact - Search for an OPP based on an *exact* frequency and
> dev_pm_opp_enable(dev,1000000000);
> }
>
> - NOTE: This is the only search function that operates on OPPs which are
> - not available.
> + NOTE:
> + This is the only search function that operates on OPPs which are
> + not available.
>
> -dev_pm_opp_find_freq_floor - Search for an available OPP which is *at most* the
> +dev_pm_opp_find_freq_floor
> + Search for an available OPP which is *at most* the
> provided frequency. This function is useful while searching for a lesser
> match OR operating on OPP information in the order of decreasing
> frequency.
> - Example: To find the highest opp for a device:
> + Example: To find the highest opp for a device::
> +
> freq = ULONG_MAX;
> opp = dev_pm_opp_find_freq_floor(dev, &freq);
> dev_pm_opp_put(opp);
>
> -dev_pm_opp_find_freq_ceil - Search for an available OPP which is *at least* the
> +dev_pm_opp_find_freq_ceil
> + Search for an available OPP which is *at least* the
> provided frequency. This function is useful while searching for a
> higher match OR operating on OPP information in the order of increasing
> frequency.
> - Example 1: To find the lowest opp for a device:
> + Example 1: To find the lowest opp for a device::
> +
> freq = 0;
> opp = dev_pm_opp_find_freq_ceil(dev, &freq);
> dev_pm_opp_put(opp);
> - Example 2: A simplified implementation of a SoC cpufreq_driver->target:
> +
> + Example 2: A simplified implementation of a SoC cpufreq_driver->target::
> +
> soc_cpufreq_target(..)
> {
> /* Do stuff like policy checks etc. */
> @@ -184,12 +205,15 @@ fine grained dynamic control of which sets of OPPs are operationally available.
> These functions are intended to *temporarily* remove an OPP in conditions such
> as thermal considerations (e.g. don't use OPPx until the temperature drops).
>
> -WARNING: Do not use these functions in interrupt context.
> +WARNING:
> + Do not use these functions in interrupt context.
>
> -dev_pm_opp_enable - Make a OPP available for operation.
> +dev_pm_opp_enable
> + Make a OPP available for operation.
> Example: Lets say that 1GHz OPP is to be made available only if the
> SoC temperature is lower than a certain threshold. The SoC framework
> - implementation might choose to do something as follows:
> + implementation might choose to do something as follows::
> +
> if (cur_temp < temp_low_thresh) {
> /* Enable 1GHz if it was disabled */
> opp = dev_pm_opp_find_freq_exact(dev, 1000000000, false);
> @@ -201,10 +225,12 @@ dev_pm_opp_enable - Make a OPP available for operation.
> goto try_something_else;
> }
>
> -dev_pm_opp_disable - Make an OPP to be not available for operation
> +dev_pm_opp_disable
> + Make an OPP to be not available for operation
> Example: Lets say that 1GHz OPP is to be disabled if the temperature
> exceeds a threshold value. The SoC framework implementation might
> - choose to do something as follows:
> + choose to do something as follows::
> +
> if (cur_temp > temp_high_thresh) {
> /* Disable 1GHz if it was enabled */
> opp = dev_pm_opp_find_freq_exact(dev, 1000000000, true);
> @@ -223,11 +249,13 @@ information from the OPP structure is necessary. Once an OPP pointer is
> retrieved using the search functions, the following functions can be used by SoC
> framework to retrieve the information represented inside the OPP layer.
>
> -dev_pm_opp_get_voltage - Retrieve the voltage represented by the opp pointer.
> +dev_pm_opp_get_voltage
> + Retrieve the voltage represented by the opp pointer.
> Example: At a cpufreq transition to a different frequency, SoC
> framework requires to set the voltage represented by the OPP using
> the regulator framework to the Power Management chip providing the
> - voltage.
> + voltage::
> +
> soc_switch_to_freq_voltage(freq)
> {
> /* do things */
> @@ -239,10 +267,12 @@ dev_pm_opp_get_voltage - Retrieve the voltage represented by the opp pointer.
> /* do other things */
> }
>
> -dev_pm_opp_get_freq - Retrieve the freq represented by the opp pointer.
> +dev_pm_opp_get_freq
> + Retrieve the freq represented by the opp pointer.
> Example: Lets say the SoC framework uses a couple of helper functions
> we could pass opp pointers instead of doing additional parameters to
> - handle quiet a bit of data parameters.
> + handle quiet a bit of data parameters::
> +
> soc_cpufreq_target(..)
> {
> /* do things.. */
> @@ -264,9 +294,11 @@ dev_pm_opp_get_freq - Retrieve the freq represented by the opp pointer.
> /* do things.. */
> }
>
> -dev_pm_opp_get_opp_count - Retrieve the number of available opps for a device
> +dev_pm_opp_get_opp_count
> + Retrieve the number of available opps for a device
> Example: Lets say a co-processor in the SoC needs to know the available
> - frequencies in a table, the main processor can notify as following:
> + frequencies in a table, the main processor can notify as following::
> +
> soc_notify_coproc_available_frequencies()
> {
> /* Do things */
> @@ -289,54 +321,59 @@ dev_pm_opp_get_opp_count - Retrieve the number of available opps for a device
> ==================
> Typically an SoC contains multiple voltage domains which are variable. Each
> domain is represented by a device pointer. The relationship to OPP can be
> -represented as follows:
> -SoC
> - |- device 1
> - | |- opp 1 (availability, freq, voltage)
> - | |- opp 2 ..
> - ... ...
> - | `- opp n ..
> - |- device 2
> - ...
> - `- device m
> +represented as follows::
> +
> + SoC
> + |- device 1
> + | |- opp 1 (availability, freq, voltage)
> + | |- opp 2 ..
> + ... ...
> + | `- opp n ..
> + |- device 2
> + ...
> + `- device m
>
> OPP library maintains a internal list that the SoC framework populates and
> accessed by various functions as described above. However, the structures
> representing the actual OPPs and domains are internal to the OPP library itself
> to allow for suitable abstraction reusable across systems.
>
> -struct dev_pm_opp - The internal data structure of OPP library which is used to
> +struct dev_pm_opp
> + The internal data structure of OPP library which is used to
> represent an OPP. In addition to the freq, voltage, availability
> information, it also contains internal book keeping information required
> for the OPP library to operate on. Pointer to this structure is
> provided back to the users such as SoC framework to be used as a
> identifier for OPP in the interactions with OPP layer.
>
> - WARNING: The struct dev_pm_opp pointer should not be parsed or modified by the
> - users. The defaults of for an instance is populated by dev_pm_opp_add, but the
> - availability of the OPP can be modified by dev_pm_opp_enable/disable functions.
> + WARNING:
> + The struct dev_pm_opp pointer should not be parsed or modified by the
> + users. The defaults of for an instance is populated by
> + dev_pm_opp_add, but the availability of the OPP can be modified
> + by dev_pm_opp_enable/disable functions.
>
> -struct device - This is used to identify a domain to the OPP layer. The
> +struct device
> + This is used to identify a domain to the OPP layer. The
> nature of the device and it's implementation is left to the user of
> OPP library such as the SoC framework.
>
> Overall, in a simplistic view, the data structure operations is represented as
> -following:
> +following::
>
> -Initialization / modification:
> - +-----+ /- dev_pm_opp_enable
> -dev_pm_opp_add --> | opp | <-------
> - | +-----+ \- dev_pm_opp_disable
> - \-------> domain_info(device)
> + Initialization / modification:
> + +-----+ /- dev_pm_opp_enable
> + dev_pm_opp_add --> | opp | <-------
> + | +-----+ \- dev_pm_opp_disable
> + \-------> domain_info(device)
>
> -Search functions:
> - /-- dev_pm_opp_find_freq_ceil ---\ +-----+
> -domain_info<---- dev_pm_opp_find_freq_exact -----> | opp |
> - \-- dev_pm_opp_find_freq_floor ---/ +-----+
> + Search functions:
> + /-- dev_pm_opp_find_freq_ceil ---\ +-----+
> + domain_info<---- dev_pm_opp_find_freq_exact -----> | opp |
> + \-- dev_pm_opp_find_freq_floor ---/ +-----+
>
> -Retrieval functions:
> -+-----+ /- dev_pm_opp_get_voltage
> -| opp | <---
> -+-----+ \- dev_pm_opp_get_freq
> + Retrieval functions:
> + +-----+ /- dev_pm_opp_get_voltage
> + | opp | <---
> + +-----+ \- dev_pm_opp_get_freq
>
> -domain_info <- dev_pm_opp_get_opp_count
> + domain_info <- dev_pm_opp_get_opp_count
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/pci.txt b/Documentation/power/pci.rst
> similarity index 97%
> rename from Documentation/power/pci.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/pci.rst
> index 8eaf9ee24d43..0e2ef7429304 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/pci.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/pci.rst
> @@ -1,4 +1,6 @@
> +====================
> PCI Power Management
> +====================
>
> Copyright (c) 2010 Rafael J. Wysocki <rjw@sisk.pl>, Novell Inc.
>
> @@ -9,14 +11,14 @@ management. Based on previous work by Patrick Mochel <mochel@transmeta.com>
> This document only covers the aspects of power management specific to PCI
> devices. For general description of the kernel's interfaces related to device
> power management refer to Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst and
> -Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt.
> +Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
> +.. contents:
>
> -1. Hardware and Platform Support for PCI Power Management
> -2. PCI Subsystem and Device Power Management
> -3. PCI Device Drivers and Power Management
> -4. Resources
> + 1. Hardware and Platform Support for PCI Power Management
> + 2. PCI Subsystem and Device Power Management
> + 3. PCI Device Drivers and Power Management
> + 4. Resources
>
>
> 1. Hardware and Platform Support for PCI Power Management
> @@ -24,6 +26,7 @@ Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt.
>
> 1.1. Native and Platform-Based Power Management
> -----------------------------------------------
> +
> In general, power management is a feature allowing one to save energy by putting
> devices into states in which they draw less power (low-power states) at the
> price of reduced functionality or performance.
> @@ -67,6 +70,7 @@ mechanisms have to be used simultaneously to obtain the desired result.
>
> 1.2. Native PCI Power Management
> --------------------------------
> +
> The PCI Bus Power Management Interface Specification (PCI PM Spec) was
> introduced between the PCI 2.1 and PCI 2.2 Specifications. It defined a
> standard interface for performing various operations related to power
> @@ -134,6 +138,7 @@ sufficiently active to generate a wakeup signal.
>
> 1.3. ACPI Device Power Management
> ---------------------------------
> +
> The platform firmware support for the power management of PCI devices is
> system-specific. However, if the system in question is compliant with the
> Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) Specification, like the
> @@ -194,6 +199,7 @@ enabled for the device to be able to generate wakeup signals.
>
> 1.4. Wakeup Signaling
> ---------------------
> +
> Wakeup signals generated by PCI devices, either as native PCI PMEs, or as
> a result of the execution of the _DSW (or _PSW) ACPI control method before
> putting the device into a low-power state, have to be caught and handled as
> @@ -265,14 +271,15 @@ the native PCI Express PME signaling cannot be used by the kernel in that case.
>
> 2.1. Device Power Management Callbacks
> --------------------------------------
> +
> The PCI Subsystem participates in the power management of PCI devices in a
> number of ways. First of all, it provides an intermediate code layer between
> the device power management core (PM core) and PCI device drivers.
> Specifically, the pm field of the PCI subsystem's struct bus_type object,
> pci_bus_type, points to a struct dev_pm_ops object, pci_dev_pm_ops, containing
> -pointers to several device power management callbacks:
> +pointers to several device power management callbacks::
>
> -const struct dev_pm_ops pci_dev_pm_ops = {
> + const struct dev_pm_ops pci_dev_pm_ops = {
> .prepare = pci_pm_prepare,
> .complete = pci_pm_complete,
> .suspend = pci_pm_suspend,
> @@ -290,7 +297,7 @@ const struct dev_pm_ops pci_dev_pm_ops = {
> .runtime_suspend = pci_pm_runtime_suspend,
> .runtime_resume = pci_pm_runtime_resume,
> .runtime_idle = pci_pm_runtime_idle,
> -};
> + };
>
> These callbacks are executed by the PM core in various situations related to
> device power management and they, in turn, execute power management callbacks
> @@ -299,9 +306,9 @@ involving some standard configuration registers of PCI devices that device
> drivers need not know or care about.
>
> The structure representing a PCI device, struct pci_dev, contains several fields
> -that these callbacks operate on:
> +that these callbacks operate on::
>
> -struct pci_dev {
> + struct pci_dev {
> ...
> pci_power_t current_state; /* Current operating state. */
> int pm_cap; /* PM capability offset in the
> @@ -315,13 +322,14 @@ struct pci_dev {
> unsigned int wakeup_prepared:1; /* Device prepared for wake up */
> unsigned int d3_delay; /* D3->D0 transition time in ms */
> ...
> -};
> + };
>
> They also indirectly use some fields of the struct device that is embedded in
> struct pci_dev.
>
> 2.2. Device Initialization
> --------------------------
> +
> The PCI subsystem's first task related to device power management is to
> prepare the device for power management and initialize the fields of struct
> pci_dev used for this purpose. This happens in two functions defined in
> @@ -348,10 +356,11 @@ during system-wide transitions to a sleep state and back to the working state.
>
> 2.3. Runtime Device Power Management
> ------------------------------------
> +
> The PCI subsystem plays a vital role in the runtime power management of PCI
> devices. For this purpose it uses the general runtime power management
> -(runtime PM) framework described in Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt.
> -Namely, it provides subsystem-level callbacks:
> +(runtime PM) framework described in Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst.
> +Namely, it provides subsystem-level callbacks::
>
> pci_pm_runtime_suspend()
> pci_pm_runtime_resume()
> @@ -425,13 +434,14 @@ to the given subsystem before the next phase begins. These phases always run
> after tasks have been frozen.
>
> 2.4.1. System Suspend
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> When the system is going into a sleep state in which the contents of memory will
> be preserved, such as one of the ACPI sleep states S1-S3, the phases are:
>
> prepare, suspend, suspend_noirq.
>
> -The following PCI bus type's callbacks, respectively, are used in these phases:
> +The following PCI bus type's callbacks, respectively, are used in these phases::
>
> pci_pm_prepare()
> pci_pm_suspend()
> @@ -492,6 +502,7 @@ this purpose). PCI device drivers are not encouraged to do that, but in some
> rare cases doing that in the driver may be the optimum approach.
>
> 2.4.2. System Resume
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> When the system is undergoing a transition from a sleep state in which the
> contents of memory have been preserved, such as one of the ACPI sleep states
> @@ -500,7 +511,7 @@ S1-S3, into the working state (ACPI S0), the phases are:
> resume_noirq, resume, complete.
>
> The following PCI bus type's callbacks, respectively, are executed in these
> -phases:
> +phases::
>
> pci_pm_resume_noirq()
> pci_pm_resume()
> @@ -539,6 +550,7 @@ The pci_pm_complete() routine only executes the device driver's pm->complete()
> callback, if defined.
>
> 2.4.3. System Hibernation
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> System hibernation is more complicated than system suspend, because it requires
> a system image to be created and written into a persistent storage medium. The
> @@ -551,7 +563,7 @@ to be free) in the following three phases:
>
> prepare, freeze, freeze_noirq
>
> -that correspond to the PCI bus type's callbacks:
> +that correspond to the PCI bus type's callbacks::
>
> pci_pm_prepare()
> pci_pm_freeze()
> @@ -580,7 +592,7 @@ back to the fully functional state and this is done in the following phases:
>
> thaw_noirq, thaw, complete
>
> -using the following PCI bus type's callbacks:
> +using the following PCI bus type's callbacks::
>
> pci_pm_thaw_noirq()
> pci_pm_thaw()
> @@ -608,7 +620,7 @@ three phases:
>
> where the prepare phase is exactly the same as for system suspend. The other
> two phases are analogous to the suspend and suspend_noirq phases, respectively.
> -The PCI subsystem-level callbacks they correspond to
> +The PCI subsystem-level callbacks they correspond to::
>
> pci_pm_poweroff()
> pci_pm_poweroff_noirq()
> @@ -618,6 +630,7 @@ although they don't attempt to save the device's standard configuration
> registers.
>
> 2.4.4. System Restore
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> System restore requires a hibernation image to be loaded into memory and the
> pre-hibernation memory contents to be restored before the pre-hibernation system
> @@ -653,7 +666,7 @@ phases:
>
> The first two of these are analogous to the resume_noirq and resume phases
> described above, respectively, and correspond to the following PCI subsystem
> -callbacks:
> +callbacks::
>
> pci_pm_restore_noirq()
> pci_pm_restore()
> @@ -671,6 +684,7 @@ resume.
>
> 3.1. Power Management Callbacks
> -------------------------------
> +
> PCI device drivers participate in power management by providing callbacks to be
> executed by the PCI subsystem's power management routines described above and by
> controlling the runtime power management of their devices.
> @@ -698,6 +712,7 @@ defined, though, they are expected to behave as described in the following
> subsections.
>
> 3.1.1. prepare()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The prepare() callback is executed during system suspend, during hibernation
> (when a hibernation image is about to be created), during power-off after
> @@ -716,6 +731,7 @@ preallocated earlier, for example in a suspend/hibernate notifier as described
> in Documentation/driver-api/pm/notifiers.rst).
>
> 3.1.2. suspend()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The suspend() callback is only executed during system suspend, after prepare()
> callbacks have been executed for all devices in the system.
> @@ -742,6 +758,7 @@ operations relying on the driver's ability to handle interrupts should be
> carried out in this callback.
>
> 3.1.3. suspend_noirq()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The suspend_noirq() callback is only executed during system suspend, after
> suspend() callbacks have been executed for all devices in the system and
> @@ -753,6 +770,7 @@ suspend_noirq() can carry out operations that would cause race conditions to
> arise if they were performed in suspend().
>
> 3.1.4. freeze()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The freeze() callback is hibernation-specific and is executed in two situations,
> during hibernation, after prepare() callbacks have been executed for all devices
> @@ -770,6 +788,7 @@ or put it into a low-power state. Still, either it or freeze_noirq() should
> save the device's standard configuration registers using pci_save_state().
>
> 3.1.5. freeze_noirq()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The freeze_noirq() callback is hibernation-specific. It is executed during
> hibernation, after prepare() and freeze() callbacks have been executed for all
> @@ -786,6 +805,7 @@ The difference between freeze_noirq() and freeze() is analogous to the
> difference between suspend_noirq() and suspend().
>
> 3.1.6. poweroff()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The poweroff() callback is hibernation-specific. It is executed when the system
> is about to be powered off after saving a hibernation image to a persistent
> @@ -802,6 +822,7 @@ into a low-power state, respectively, but it need not save the device's standard
> configuration registers.
>
> 3.1.7. poweroff_noirq()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The poweroff_noirq() callback is hibernation-specific. It is executed after
> poweroff() callbacks have been executed for all devices in the system.
> @@ -814,6 +835,7 @@ The difference between poweroff_noirq() and poweroff() is analogous to the
> difference between suspend_noirq() and suspend().
>
> 3.1.8. resume_noirq()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The resume_noirq() callback is only executed during system resume, after the
> PM core has enabled the non-boot CPUs. The driver's interrupt handler will not
> @@ -827,6 +849,7 @@ it should only be used for performing operations that would lead to race
> conditions if carried out by resume().
>
> 3.1.9. resume()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The resume() callback is only executed during system resume, after
> resume_noirq() callbacks have been executed for all devices in the system and
> @@ -837,6 +860,7 @@ device and bringing it back to the fully functional state. The device should be
> able to process I/O in a usual way after resume() has returned.
>
> 3.1.10. thaw_noirq()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The thaw_noirq() callback is hibernation-specific. It is executed after a
> system image has been created and the non-boot CPUs have been enabled by the PM
> @@ -851,6 +875,7 @@ freeze() and freeze_noirq(), so in general it does not need to modify the
> contents of the device's registers.
>
> 3.1.11. thaw()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The thaw() callback is hibernation-specific. It is executed after thaw_noirq()
> callbacks have been executed for all devices in the system and after device
> @@ -860,6 +885,7 @@ This callback is responsible for restoring the pre-freeze configuration of
> the device, so that it will work in a usual way after thaw() has returned.
>
> 3.1.12. restore_noirq()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The restore_noirq() callback is hibernation-specific. It is executed in the
> restore_noirq phase of hibernation, when the boot kernel has passed control to
> @@ -875,6 +901,7 @@ For the vast majority of PCI device drivers there is no difference between
> resume_noirq() and restore_noirq().
>
> 3.1.13. restore()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The restore() callback is hibernation-specific. It is executed after
> restore_noirq() callbacks have been executed for all devices in the system and
> @@ -888,14 +915,17 @@ For the vast majority of PCI device drivers there is no difference between
> resume() and restore().
>
> 3.1.14. complete()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The complete() callback is executed in the following situations:
> +
> - during system resume, after resume() callbacks have been executed for all
> devices,
> - during hibernation, before saving the system image, after thaw() callbacks
> have been executed for all devices,
> - during system restore, when the system is going back to its pre-hibernation
> state, after restore() callbacks have been executed for all devices.
> +
> It also may be executed if the loading of a hibernation image into memory fails
> (in that case it is run after thaw() callbacks have been executed for all
> devices that have drivers in the boot kernel).
> @@ -904,6 +934,7 @@ This callback is entirely optional, although it may be necessary if the
> prepare() callback performs operations that need to be reversed.
>
> 3.1.15. runtime_suspend()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The runtime_suspend() callback is specific to device runtime power management
> (runtime PM). It is executed by the PM core's runtime PM framework when the
> @@ -915,6 +946,7 @@ put into a low-power state, but it must allow the PCI subsystem to perform all
> of the PCI-specific actions necessary for suspending the device.
>
> 3.1.16. runtime_resume()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The runtime_resume() callback is specific to device runtime PM. It is executed
> by the PM core's runtime PM framework when the device is about to be resumed
> @@ -927,6 +959,7 @@ The device is expected to be able to process I/O in the usual way after
> runtime_resume() has returned.
>
> 3.1.17. runtime_idle()
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The runtime_idle() callback is specific to device runtime PM. It is executed
> by the PM core's runtime PM framework whenever it may be desirable to suspend
> @@ -939,6 +972,7 @@ PCI subsystem will call pm_runtime_suspend() for the device, which in turn will
> cause the driver's runtime_suspend() callback to be executed.
>
> 3.1.18. Pointing Multiple Callback Pointers to One Routine
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> Although in principle each of the callbacks described in the previous
> subsections can be defined as a separate function, it often is convenient to
> @@ -962,6 +996,7 @@ dev_pm_ops to indicate that one suspend routine is to be pointed to by the
> be pointed to by the .resume(), .thaw(), and .restore() members.
>
> 3.1.19. Driver Flags for Power Management
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> The PM core allows device drivers to set flags that influence the handling of
> power management for the devices by the core itself and by middle layer code
> @@ -1007,6 +1042,7 @@ it.
>
> 3.2. Device Runtime Power Management
> ------------------------------------
> +
> In addition to providing device power management callbacks PCI device drivers
> are responsible for controlling the runtime power management (runtime PM) of
> their devices.
> @@ -1073,22 +1109,27 @@ device the PM core automatically queues a request to check if the device is
> idle), device drivers are generally responsible for queuing power management
> requests for their devices. For this purpose they should use the runtime PM
> helper functions provided by the PM core, discussed in
> -Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt.
> +Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst.
>
> Devices can also be suspended and resumed synchronously, without placing a
> request into pm_wq. In the majority of cases this also is done by their
> drivers that use helper functions provided by the PM core for this purpose.
>
> For more information on the runtime PM of devices refer to
> -Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt.
> +Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst.
>
>
> 4. Resources
> ============
>
> PCI Local Bus Specification, Rev. 3.0
> +
> PCI Bus Power Management Interface Specification, Rev. 1.2
> +
> Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) Specification, Rev. 3.0b
> +
> PCI Express Base Specification, Rev. 2.0
> +
> Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst
> -Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt
> +
> +Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.txt b/Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.rst
> similarity index 62%
> rename from Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.rst
> index 19c5f7b1a7ba..945fc6d760c9 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.rst
> @@ -1,4 +1,6 @@
> -PM Quality Of Service Interface.
> +===============================
> +PM Quality Of Service Interface
> +===============================
>
> This interface provides a kernel and user mode interface for registering
> performance expectations by drivers, subsystems and user space applications on
> @@ -11,6 +13,7 @@ memory_bandwidth.
> constraints and PM QoS flags.
>
> Each parameters have defined units:
> +
> * latency: usec
> * timeout: usec
> * throughput: kbs (kilo bit / sec)
> @@ -18,6 +21,7 @@ Each parameters have defined units:
>
>
> 1. PM QoS framework
> +===================
>
> The infrastructure exposes multiple misc device nodes one per implemented
> parameter. The set of parameters implement is defined by pm_qos_power_init()
> @@ -37,38 +41,39 @@ reading the aggregated value does not require any locking mechanism.
> From kernel mode the use of this interface is simple:
>
> void pm_qos_add_request(handle, param_class, target_value):
> -Will insert an element into the list for that identified PM QoS class with the
> -target value. Upon change to this list the new target is recomputed and any
> -registered notifiers are called only if the target value is now different.
> -Clients of pm_qos need to save the returned handle for future use in other
> -pm_qos API functions.
> + Will insert an element into the list for that identified PM QoS class with the
> + target value. Upon change to this list the new target is recomputed and any
> + registered notifiers are called only if the target value is now different.
> + Clients of pm_qos need to save the returned handle for future use in other
> + pm_qos API functions.
>
> void pm_qos_update_request(handle, new_target_value):
> -Will update the list element pointed to by the handle with the new target value
> -and recompute the new aggregated target, calling the notification tree if the
> -target is changed.
> + Will update the list element pointed to by the handle with the new target value
> + and recompute the new aggregated target, calling the notification tree if the
> + target is changed.
>
> void pm_qos_remove_request(handle):
> -Will remove the element. After removal it will update the aggregate target and
> -call the notification tree if the target was changed as a result of removing
> -the request.
> + Will remove the element. After removal it will update the aggregate target and
> + call the notification tree if the target was changed as a result of removing
> + the request.
>
> int pm_qos_request(param_class):
> -Returns the aggregated value for a given PM QoS class.
> + Returns the aggregated value for a given PM QoS class.
>
> int pm_qos_request_active(handle):
> -Returns if the request is still active, i.e. it has not been removed from a
> -PM QoS class constraints list.
> + Returns if the request is still active, i.e. it has not been removed from a
> + PM QoS class constraints list.
>
> int pm_qos_add_notifier(param_class, notifier):
> -Adds a notification callback function to the PM QoS class. The callback is
> -called when the aggregated value for the PM QoS class is changed.
> + Adds a notification callback function to the PM QoS class. The callback is
> + called when the aggregated value for the PM QoS class is changed.
>
> int pm_qos_remove_notifier(int param_class, notifier):
> -Removes the notification callback function for the PM QoS class.
> + Removes the notification callback function for the PM QoS class.
>
>
> From user mode:
> +
> Only processes can register a pm_qos request. To provide for automatic
> cleanup of a process, the interface requires the process to register its
> parameter requests in the following way:
> @@ -89,6 +94,7 @@ node.
>
>
> 2. PM QoS per-device latency and flags framework
> +================================================
>
> For each device, there are three lists of PM QoS requests. Two of them are
> maintained along with the aggregated targets of resume latency and active
> @@ -107,73 +113,80 @@ the aggregated value does not require any locking mechanism.
> From kernel mode the use of this interface is the following:
>
> int dev_pm_qos_add_request(device, handle, type, value):
> -Will insert an element into the list for that identified device with the
> -target value. Upon change to this list the new target is recomputed and any
> -registered notifiers are called only if the target value is now different.
> -Clients of dev_pm_qos need to save the handle for future use in other
> -dev_pm_qos API functions.
> + Will insert an element into the list for that identified device with the
> + target value. Upon change to this list the new target is recomputed and any
> + registered notifiers are called only if the target value is now different.
> + Clients of dev_pm_qos need to save the handle for future use in other
> + dev_pm_qos API functions.
>
> int dev_pm_qos_update_request(handle, new_value):
> -Will update the list element pointed to by the handle with the new target value
> -and recompute the new aggregated target, calling the notification trees if the
> -target is changed.
> + Will update the list element pointed to by the handle with the new target
> + value and recompute the new aggregated target, calling the notification
> + trees if the target is changed.
>
> int dev_pm_qos_remove_request(handle):
> -Will remove the element. After removal it will update the aggregate target and
> -call the notification trees if the target was changed as a result of removing
> -the request.
> + Will remove the element. After removal it will update the aggregate target
> + and call the notification trees if the target was changed as a result of
> + removing the request.
>
> s32 dev_pm_qos_read_value(device):
> -Returns the aggregated value for a given device's constraints list.
> + Returns the aggregated value for a given device's constraints list.
>
> enum pm_qos_flags_status dev_pm_qos_flags(device, mask)
> -Check PM QoS flags of the given device against the given mask of flags.
> -The meaning of the return values is as follows:
> - PM_QOS_FLAGS_ALL: All flags from the mask are set
> - PM_QOS_FLAGS_SOME: Some flags from the mask are set
> - PM_QOS_FLAGS_NONE: No flags from the mask are set
> - PM_QOS_FLAGS_UNDEFINED: The device's PM QoS structure has not been
> - initialized or the list of requests is empty.
> + Check PM QoS flags of the given device against the given mask of flags.
> + The meaning of the return values is as follows:
> +
> + PM_QOS_FLAGS_ALL:
> + All flags from the mask are set
> + PM_QOS_FLAGS_SOME:
> + Some flags from the mask are set
> + PM_QOS_FLAGS_NONE:
> + No flags from the mask are set
> + PM_QOS_FLAGS_UNDEFINED:
> + The device's PM QoS structure has not been initialized
> + or the list of requests is empty.
>
> int dev_pm_qos_add_ancestor_request(dev, handle, type, value)
> -Add a PM QoS request for the first direct ancestor of the given device whose
> -power.ignore_children flag is unset (for DEV_PM_QOS_RESUME_LATENCY requests)
> -or whose power.set_latency_tolerance callback pointer is not NULL (for
> -DEV_PM_QOS_LATENCY_TOLERANCE requests).
> + Add a PM QoS request for the first direct ancestor of the given device whose
> + power.ignore_children flag is unset (for DEV_PM_QOS_RESUME_LATENCY requests)
> + or whose power.set_latency_tolerance callback pointer is not NULL (for
> + DEV_PM_QOS_LATENCY_TOLERANCE requests).
>
> int dev_pm_qos_expose_latency_limit(device, value)
> -Add a request to the device's PM QoS list of resume latency constraints and
> -create a sysfs attribute pm_qos_resume_latency_us under the device's power
> -directory allowing user space to manipulate that request.
> + Add a request to the device's PM QoS list of resume latency constraints and
> + create a sysfs attribute pm_qos_resume_latency_us under the device's power
> + directory allowing user space to manipulate that request.
>
> void dev_pm_qos_hide_latency_limit(device)
> -Drop the request added by dev_pm_qos_expose_latency_limit() from the device's
> -PM QoS list of resume latency constraints and remove sysfs attribute
> -pm_qos_resume_latency_us from the device's power directory.
> + Drop the request added by dev_pm_qos_expose_latency_limit() from the device's
> + PM QoS list of resume latency constraints and remove sysfs attribute
> + pm_qos_resume_latency_us from the device's power directory.
>
> int dev_pm_qos_expose_flags(device, value)
> -Add a request to the device's PM QoS list of flags and create sysfs attribute
> -pm_qos_no_power_off under the device's power directory allowing user space to
> -change the value of the PM_QOS_FLAG_NO_POWER_OFF flag.
> + Add a request to the device's PM QoS list of flags and create sysfs attribute
> + pm_qos_no_power_off under the device's power directory allowing user space to
> + change the value of the PM_QOS_FLAG_NO_POWER_OFF flag.
>
> void dev_pm_qos_hide_flags(device)
> -Drop the request added by dev_pm_qos_expose_flags() from the device's PM QoS list
> -of flags and remove sysfs attribute pm_qos_no_power_off from the device's power
> -directory.
> + Drop the request added by dev_pm_qos_expose_flags() from the device's PM QoS list
> + of flags and remove sysfs attribute pm_qos_no_power_off from the device's power
> + directory.
>
> Notification mechanisms:
> +
> The per-device PM QoS framework has a per-device notification tree.
>
> int dev_pm_qos_add_notifier(device, notifier):
> -Adds a notification callback function for the device.
> -The callback is called when the aggregated value of the device constraints list
> -is changed (for resume latency device PM QoS only).
> + Adds a notification callback function for the device.
> + The callback is called when the aggregated value of the device constraints list
> + is changed (for resume latency device PM QoS only).
>
> int dev_pm_qos_remove_notifier(device, notifier):
> -Removes the notification callback function for the device.
> + Removes the notification callback function for the device.
>
>
> Active state latency tolerance
> +^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
> This device PM QoS type is used to support systems in which hardware may switch
> to energy-saving operation modes on the fly. In those systems, if the operation
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/power_supply_class.rst b/Documentation/power/power_supply_class.rst
> new file mode 100644
> index 000000000000..3f2c3fe38a61
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/Documentation/power/power_supply_class.rst
> @@ -0,0 +1,282 @@
> +========================
> +Linux power supply class
> +========================
> +
> +Synopsis
> +~~~~~~~~
> +Power supply class used to represent battery, UPS, AC or DC power supply
> +properties to user-space.
> +
> +It defines core set of attributes, which should be applicable to (almost)
> +every power supply out there. Attributes are available via sysfs and uevent
> +interfaces.
> +
> +Each attribute has well defined meaning, up to unit of measure used. While
> +the attributes provided are believed to be universally applicable to any
> +power supply, specific monitoring hardware may not be able to provide them
> +all, so any of them may be skipped.
> +
> +Power supply class is extensible, and allows to define drivers own attributes.
> +The core attribute set is subject to the standard Linux evolution (i.e.
> +if it will be found that some attribute is applicable to many power supply
> +types or their drivers, it can be added to the core set).
> +
> +It also integrates with LED framework, for the purpose of providing
> +typically expected feedback of battery charging/fully charged status and
> +AC/USB power supply online status. (Note that specific details of the
> +indication (including whether to use it at all) are fully controllable by
> +user and/or specific machine defaults, per design principles of LED
> +framework).
> +
> +
> +Attributes/properties
> +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> +Power supply class has predefined set of attributes, this eliminates code
> +duplication across drivers. Power supply class insist on reusing its
> +predefined attributes *and* their units.
> +
> +So, userspace gets predictable set of attributes and their units for any
> +kind of power supply, and can process/present them to a user in consistent
> +manner. Results for different power supplies and machines are also directly
> +comparable.
> +
> +See drivers/power/supply/ds2760_battery.c and drivers/power/supply/pda_power.c
> +for the example how to declare and handle attributes.
> +
> +
> +Units
> +~~~~~
> +Quoting include/linux/power_supply.h:
> +
> + All voltages, currents, charges, energies, time and temperatures in µV,
> + µA, µAh, µWh, seconds and tenths of degree Celsius unless otherwise
> + stated. It's driver's job to convert its raw values to units in which
> + this class operates.
> +
> +
> +Attributes/properties detailed
> +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> +
> ++--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
> +| **Charge/Energy/Capacity - how to not confuse** |
> ++--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
> +| **Because both "charge" (µAh) and "energy" (µWh) represents "capacity" |
> +| of battery, this class distinguish these terms. Don't mix them!** |
> +| |
> +| - `CHARGE_*` |
> +| attributes represents capacity in µAh only. |
> +| - `ENERGY_*` |
> +| attributes represents capacity in µWh only. |
> +| - `CAPACITY` |
> +| attribute represents capacity in *percents*, from 0 to 100. |
> ++--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
> +
> +Postfixes:
> +
> +_AVG
> + *hardware* averaged value, use it if your hardware is really able to
> + report averaged values.
> +_NOW
> + momentary/instantaneous values.
> +
> +STATUS
> + this attribute represents operating status (charging, full,
> + discharging (i.e. powering a load), etc.). This corresponds to
> + `BATTERY_STATUS_*` values, as defined in battery.h.
> +
> +CHARGE_TYPE
> + batteries can typically charge at different rates.
> + This defines trickle and fast charges. For batteries that
> + are already charged or discharging, 'n/a' can be displayed (or
> + 'unknown', if the status is not known).
> +
> +AUTHENTIC
> + indicates the power supply (battery or charger) connected
> + to the platform is authentic(1) or non authentic(0).
> +
> +HEALTH
> + represents health of the battery, values corresponds to
> + POWER_SUPPLY_HEALTH_*, defined in battery.h.
> +
> +VOLTAGE_OCV
> + open circuit voltage of the battery.
> +
> +VOLTAGE_MAX_DESIGN, VOLTAGE_MIN_DESIGN
> + design values for maximal and minimal power supply voltages.
> + Maximal/minimal means values of voltages when battery considered
> + "full"/"empty" at normal conditions. Yes, there is no direct relation
> + between voltage and battery capacity, but some dumb
> + batteries use voltage for very approximated calculation of capacity.
> + Battery driver also can use this attribute just to inform userspace
> + about maximal and minimal voltage thresholds of a given battery.
> +
> +VOLTAGE_MAX, VOLTAGE_MIN
> + same as _DESIGN voltage values except that these ones should be used
> + if hardware could only guess (measure and retain) the thresholds of a
> + given power supply.
> +
> +VOLTAGE_BOOT
> + Reports the voltage measured during boot
> +
> +CURRENT_BOOT
> + Reports the current measured during boot
> +
> +CHARGE_FULL_DESIGN, CHARGE_EMPTY_DESIGN
> + design charge values, when battery considered full/empty.
> +
> +ENERGY_FULL_DESIGN, ENERGY_EMPTY_DESIGN
> + same as above but for energy.
> +
> +CHARGE_FULL, CHARGE_EMPTY
> + These attributes means "last remembered value of charge when battery
> + became full/empty". It also could mean "value of charge when battery
> + considered full/empty at given conditions (temperature, age)".
> + I.e. these attributes represents real thresholds, not design values.
> +
> +ENERGY_FULL, ENERGY_EMPTY
> + same as above but for energy.
> +
> +CHARGE_COUNTER
> + the current charge counter (in µAh). This could easily
> + be negative; there is no empty or full value. It is only useful for
> + relative, time-based measurements.
> +
> +PRECHARGE_CURRENT
> + the maximum charge current during precharge phase of charge cycle
> + (typically 20% of battery capacity).
> +
> +CHARGE_TERM_CURRENT
> + Charge termination current. The charge cycle terminates when battery
> + voltage is above recharge threshold, and charge current is below
> + this setting (typically 10% of battery capacity).
> +
> +CONSTANT_CHARGE_CURRENT
> + constant charge current programmed by charger.
> +
> +
> +CONSTANT_CHARGE_CURRENT_MAX
> + maximum charge current supported by the power supply object.
> +
> +CONSTANT_CHARGE_VOLTAGE
> + constant charge voltage programmed by charger.
> +CONSTANT_CHARGE_VOLTAGE_MAX
> + maximum charge voltage supported by the power supply object.
> +
> +INPUT_CURRENT_LIMIT
> + input current limit programmed by charger. Indicates
> + the current drawn from a charging source.
> +
> +CHARGE_CONTROL_LIMIT
> + current charge control limit setting
> +CHARGE_CONTROL_LIMIT_MAX
> + maximum charge control limit setting
> +
> +CALIBRATE
> + battery or coulomb counter calibration status
> +
> +CAPACITY
> + capacity in percents.
> +CAPACITY_ALERT_MIN
> + minimum capacity alert value in percents.
> +CAPACITY_ALERT_MAX
> + maximum capacity alert value in percents.
> +CAPACITY_LEVEL
> + capacity level. This corresponds to POWER_SUPPLY_CAPACITY_LEVEL_*.
> +
> +TEMP
> + temperature of the power supply.
> +TEMP_ALERT_MIN
> + minimum battery temperature alert.
> +TEMP_ALERT_MAX
> + maximum battery temperature alert.
> +TEMP_AMBIENT
> + ambient temperature.
> +TEMP_AMBIENT_ALERT_MIN
> + minimum ambient temperature alert.
> +TEMP_AMBIENT_ALERT_MAX
> + maximum ambient temperature alert.
> +TEMP_MIN
> + minimum operatable temperature
> +TEMP_MAX
> + maximum operatable temperature
> +
> +TIME_TO_EMPTY
> + seconds left for battery to be considered empty
> + (i.e. while battery powers a load)
> +TIME_TO_FULL
> + seconds left for battery to be considered full
> + (i.e. while battery is charging)
> +
> +
> +Battery <-> external power supply interaction
> +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> +Often power supplies are acting as supplies and supplicants at the same
> +time. Batteries are good example. So, batteries usually care if they're
> +externally powered or not.
> +
> +For that case, power supply class implements notification mechanism for
> +batteries.
> +
> +External power supply (AC) lists supplicants (batteries) names in
> +"supplied_to" struct member, and each power_supply_changed() call
> +issued by external power supply will notify supplicants via
> +external_power_changed callback.
> +
> +
> +Devicetree battery characteristics
> +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> +Drivers should call power_supply_get_battery_info() to obtain battery
> +characteristics from a devicetree battery node, defined in
> +Documentation/devicetree/bindings/power/supply/battery.txt. This is
> +implemented in drivers/power/supply/bq27xxx_battery.c.
> +
> +Properties in struct power_supply_battery_info and their counterparts in the
> +battery node have names corresponding to elements in enum power_supply_property,
> +for naming consistency between sysfs attributes and battery node properties.
> +
> +
> +QA
> +~~
> +
> +Q:
> + Where is POWER_SUPPLY_PROP_XYZ attribute?
> +A:
> + If you cannot find attribute suitable for your driver needs, feel free
> + to add it and send patch along with your driver.
> +
> + The attributes available currently are the ones currently provided by the
> + drivers written.
> +
> + Good candidates to add in future: model/part#, cycle_time, manufacturer,
> + etc.
> +
> +
> +Q:
> + I have some very specific attribute (e.g. battery color), should I add
> + this attribute to standard ones?
> +A:
> + Most likely, no. Such attribute can be placed in the driver itself, if
> + it is useful. Of course, if the attribute in question applicable to
> + large set of batteries, provided by many drivers, and/or comes from
> + some general battery specification/standard, it may be a candidate to
> + be added to the core attribute set.
> +
> +
> +Q:
> + Suppose, my battery monitoring chip/firmware does not provides capacity
> + in percents, but provides charge_{now,full,empty}. Should I calculate
> + percentage capacity manually, inside the driver, and register CAPACITY
> + attribute? The same question about time_to_empty/time_to_full.
> +A:
> + Most likely, no. This class is designed to export properties which are
> + directly measurable by the specific hardware available.
> +
> + Inferring not available properties using some heuristics or mathematical
> + model is not subject of work for a battery driver. Such functionality
> + should be factored out, and in fact, apm_power, the driver to serve
> + legacy APM API on top of power supply class, uses a simple heuristic of
> + approximating remaining battery capacity based on its charge, current,
> + voltage and so on. But full-fledged battery model is likely not subject
> + for kernel at all, as it would require floating point calculation to deal
> + with things like differential equations and Kalman filters. This is
> + better be handled by batteryd/libbattery, yet to be written.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/power_supply_class.txt b/Documentation/power/power_supply_class.txt
> deleted file mode 100644
> index 300d37896e51..000000000000
> --- a/Documentation/power/power_supply_class.txt
> +++ /dev/null
> @@ -1,231 +0,0 @@
> -Linux power supply class
> -========================
> -
> -Synopsis
> -~~~~~~~~
> -Power supply class used to represent battery, UPS, AC or DC power supply
> -properties to user-space.
> -
> -It defines core set of attributes, which should be applicable to (almost)
> -every power supply out there. Attributes are available via sysfs and uevent
> -interfaces.
> -
> -Each attribute has well defined meaning, up to unit of measure used. While
> -the attributes provided are believed to be universally applicable to any
> -power supply, specific monitoring hardware may not be able to provide them
> -all, so any of them may be skipped.
> -
> -Power supply class is extensible, and allows to define drivers own attributes.
> -The core attribute set is subject to the standard Linux evolution (i.e.
> -if it will be found that some attribute is applicable to many power supply
> -types or their drivers, it can be added to the core set).
> -
> -It also integrates with LED framework, for the purpose of providing
> -typically expected feedback of battery charging/fully charged status and
> -AC/USB power supply online status. (Note that specific details of the
> -indication (including whether to use it at all) are fully controllable by
> -user and/or specific machine defaults, per design principles of LED
> -framework).
> -
> -
> -Attributes/properties
> -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> -Power supply class has predefined set of attributes, this eliminates code
> -duplication across drivers. Power supply class insist on reusing its
> -predefined attributes *and* their units.
> -
> -So, userspace gets predictable set of attributes and their units for any
> -kind of power supply, and can process/present them to a user in consistent
> -manner. Results for different power supplies and machines are also directly
> -comparable.
> -
> -See drivers/power/supply/ds2760_battery.c and drivers/power/supply/pda_power.c
> -for the example how to declare and handle attributes.
> -
> -
> -Units
> -~~~~~
> -Quoting include/linux/power_supply.h:
> -
> - All voltages, currents, charges, energies, time and temperatures in µV,
> - µA, µAh, µWh, seconds and tenths of degree Celsius unless otherwise
> - stated. It's driver's job to convert its raw values to units in which
> - this class operates.
> -
> -
> -Attributes/properties detailed
> -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> -
> -~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Charge/Energy/Capacity - how to not confuse ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
> -~ ~
> -~ Because both "charge" (µAh) and "energy" (µWh) represents "capacity" ~
> -~ of battery, this class distinguish these terms. Don't mix them! ~
> -~ ~
> -~ CHARGE_* attributes represents capacity in µAh only. ~
> -~ ENERGY_* attributes represents capacity in µWh only. ~
> -~ CAPACITY attribute represents capacity in *percents*, from 0 to 100. ~
> -~ ~
> -~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
> -
> -Postfixes:
> -_AVG - *hardware* averaged value, use it if your hardware is really able to
> -report averaged values.
> -_NOW - momentary/instantaneous values.
> -
> -STATUS - this attribute represents operating status (charging, full,
> -discharging (i.e. powering a load), etc.). This corresponds to
> -BATTERY_STATUS_* values, as defined in battery.h.
> -
> -CHARGE_TYPE - batteries can typically charge at different rates.
> -This defines trickle and fast charges. For batteries that
> -are already charged or discharging, 'n/a' can be displayed (or
> -'unknown', if the status is not known).
> -
> -AUTHENTIC - indicates the power supply (battery or charger) connected
> -to the platform is authentic(1) or non authentic(0).
> -
> -HEALTH - represents health of the battery, values corresponds to
> -POWER_SUPPLY_HEALTH_*, defined in battery.h.
> -
> -VOLTAGE_OCV - open circuit voltage of the battery.
> -
> -VOLTAGE_MAX_DESIGN, VOLTAGE_MIN_DESIGN - design values for maximal and
> -minimal power supply voltages. Maximal/minimal means values of voltages
> -when battery considered "full"/"empty" at normal conditions. Yes, there is
> -no direct relation between voltage and battery capacity, but some dumb
> -batteries use voltage for very approximated calculation of capacity.
> -Battery driver also can use this attribute just to inform userspace
> -about maximal and minimal voltage thresholds of a given battery.
> -
> -VOLTAGE_MAX, VOLTAGE_MIN - same as _DESIGN voltage values except that
> -these ones should be used if hardware could only guess (measure and
> -retain) the thresholds of a given power supply.
> -
> -VOLTAGE_BOOT - Reports the voltage measured during boot
> -
> -CURRENT_BOOT - Reports the current measured during boot
> -
> -CHARGE_FULL_DESIGN, CHARGE_EMPTY_DESIGN - design charge values, when
> -battery considered full/empty.
> -
> -ENERGY_FULL_DESIGN, ENERGY_EMPTY_DESIGN - same as above but for energy.
> -
> -CHARGE_FULL, CHARGE_EMPTY - These attributes means "last remembered value
> -of charge when battery became full/empty". It also could mean "value of
> -charge when battery considered full/empty at given conditions (temperature,
> -age)". I.e. these attributes represents real thresholds, not design values.
> -
> -ENERGY_FULL, ENERGY_EMPTY - same as above but for energy.
> -
> -CHARGE_COUNTER - the current charge counter (in µAh). This could easily
> -be negative; there is no empty or full value. It is only useful for
> -relative, time-based measurements.
> -
> -PRECHARGE_CURRENT - the maximum charge current during precharge phase
> -of charge cycle (typically 20% of battery capacity).
> -CHARGE_TERM_CURRENT - Charge termination current. The charge cycle
> -terminates when battery voltage is above recharge threshold, and charge
> -current is below this setting (typically 10% of battery capacity).
> -
> -CONSTANT_CHARGE_CURRENT - constant charge current programmed by charger.
> -CONSTANT_CHARGE_CURRENT_MAX - maximum charge current supported by the
> -power supply object.
> -
> -CONSTANT_CHARGE_VOLTAGE - constant charge voltage programmed by charger.
> -CONSTANT_CHARGE_VOLTAGE_MAX - maximum charge voltage supported by the
> -power supply object.
> -
> -INPUT_CURRENT_LIMIT - input current limit programmed by charger. Indicates
> -the current drawn from a charging source.
> -
> -CHARGE_CONTROL_LIMIT - current charge control limit setting
> -CHARGE_CONTROL_LIMIT_MAX - maximum charge control limit setting
> -
> -CALIBRATE - battery or coulomb counter calibration status
> -
> -CAPACITY - capacity in percents.
> -CAPACITY_ALERT_MIN - minimum capacity alert value in percents.
> -CAPACITY_ALERT_MAX - maximum capacity alert value in percents.
> -CAPACITY_LEVEL - capacity level. This corresponds to
> -POWER_SUPPLY_CAPACITY_LEVEL_*.
> -
> -TEMP - temperature of the power supply.
> -TEMP_ALERT_MIN - minimum battery temperature alert.
> -TEMP_ALERT_MAX - maximum battery temperature alert.
> -TEMP_AMBIENT - ambient temperature.
> -TEMP_AMBIENT_ALERT_MIN - minimum ambient temperature alert.
> -TEMP_AMBIENT_ALERT_MAX - maximum ambient temperature alert.
> -TEMP_MIN - minimum operatable temperature
> -TEMP_MAX - maximum operatable temperature
> -
> -TIME_TO_EMPTY - seconds left for battery to be considered empty (i.e.
> -while battery powers a load)
> -TIME_TO_FULL - seconds left for battery to be considered full (i.e.
> -while battery is charging)
> -
> -
> -Battery <-> external power supply interaction
> -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> -Often power supplies are acting as supplies and supplicants at the same
> -time. Batteries are good example. So, batteries usually care if they're
> -externally powered or not.
> -
> -For that case, power supply class implements notification mechanism for
> -batteries.
> -
> -External power supply (AC) lists supplicants (batteries) names in
> -"supplied_to" struct member, and each power_supply_changed() call
> -issued by external power supply will notify supplicants via
> -external_power_changed callback.
> -
> -
> -Devicetree battery characteristics
> -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> -Drivers should call power_supply_get_battery_info() to obtain battery
> -characteristics from a devicetree battery node, defined in
> -Documentation/devicetree/bindings/power/supply/battery.txt. This is
> -implemented in drivers/power/supply/bq27xxx_battery.c.
> -
> -Properties in struct power_supply_battery_info and their counterparts in the
> -battery node have names corresponding to elements in enum power_supply_property,
> -for naming consistency between sysfs attributes and battery node properties.
> -
> -
> -QA
> -~~
> -Q: Where is POWER_SUPPLY_PROP_XYZ attribute?
> -A: If you cannot find attribute suitable for your driver needs, feel free
> - to add it and send patch along with your driver.
> -
> - The attributes available currently are the ones currently provided by the
> - drivers written.
> -
> - Good candidates to add in future: model/part#, cycle_time, manufacturer,
> - etc.
> -
> -
> -Q: I have some very specific attribute (e.g. battery color), should I add
> - this attribute to standard ones?
> -A: Most likely, no. Such attribute can be placed in the driver itself, if
> - it is useful. Of course, if the attribute in question applicable to
> - large set of batteries, provided by many drivers, and/or comes from
> - some general battery specification/standard, it may be a candidate to
> - be added to the core attribute set.
> -
> -
> -Q: Suppose, my battery monitoring chip/firmware does not provides capacity
> - in percents, but provides charge_{now,full,empty}. Should I calculate
> - percentage capacity manually, inside the driver, and register CAPACITY
> - attribute? The same question about time_to_empty/time_to_full.
> -A: Most likely, no. This class is designed to export properties which are
> - directly measurable by the specific hardware available.
> -
> - Inferring not available properties using some heuristics or mathematical
> - model is not subject of work for a battery driver. Such functionality
> - should be factored out, and in fact, apm_power, the driver to serve
> - legacy APM API on top of power supply class, uses a simple heuristic of
> - approximating remaining battery capacity based on its charge, current,
> - voltage and so on. But full-fledged battery model is likely not subject
> - for kernel at all, as it would require floating point calculation to deal
> - with things like differential equations and Kalman filters. This is
> - better be handled by batteryd/libbattery, yet to be written.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.rst b/Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.rst
> new file mode 100644
> index 000000000000..7ae3b44c7624
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.rst
> @@ -0,0 +1,257 @@
> +=======================
> +Power Capping Framework
> +=======================
> +
> +The power capping framework provides a consistent interface between the kernel
> +and the user space that allows power capping drivers to expose the settings to
> +user space in a uniform way.
> +
> +Terminology
> +===========
> +
> +The framework exposes power capping devices to user space via sysfs in the
> +form of a tree of objects. The objects at the root level of the tree represent
> +'control types', which correspond to different methods of power capping. For
> +example, the intel-rapl control type represents the Intel "Running Average
> +Power Limit" (RAPL) technology, whereas the 'idle-injection' control type
> +corresponds to the use of idle injection for controlling power.
> +
> +Power zones represent different parts of the system, which can be controlled and
> +monitored using the power capping method determined by the control type the
> +given zone belongs to. They each contain attributes for monitoring power, as
> +well as controls represented in the form of power constraints. If the parts of
> +the system represented by different power zones are hierarchical (that is, one
> +bigger part consists of multiple smaller parts that each have their own power
> +controls), those power zones may also be organized in a hierarchy with one
> +parent power zone containing multiple subzones and so on to reflect the power
> +control topology of the system. In that case, it is possible to apply power
> +capping to a set of devices together using the parent power zone and if more
> +fine grained control is required, it can be applied through the subzones.
> +
> +
> +Example sysfs interface tree::
> +
> + /sys/devices/virtual/powercap
> + └──intel-rapl
> + ├──intel-rapl:0
> + │   ├──constraint_0_name
> + │   ├──constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> + │   ├──constraint_0_time_window_us
> + │   ├──constraint_1_name
> + │   ├──constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> + │   ├──constraint_1_time_window_us
> + │   ├──device -> ../../intel-rapl
> + │   ├──energy_uj
> + │   ├──intel-rapl:0:0
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_name
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_time_window_us
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_name
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_time_window_us
> + │   │   ├──device -> ../../intel-rapl:0
> + │   │   ├──energy_uj
> + │   │   ├──max_energy_range_uj
> + │   │   ├──name
> + │   │   ├──enabled
> + │   │   ├──power
> + │   │   │   ├──async
> + │   │   │   []
> + │   │   ├──subsystem -> ../../../../../../class/power_cap
> + │   │   └──uevent
> + │   ├──intel-rapl:0:1
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_name
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_time_window_us
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_name
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_time_window_us
> + │   │   ├──device -> ../../intel-rapl:0
> + │   │   ├──energy_uj
> + │   │   ├──max_energy_range_uj
> + │   │   ├──name
> + │   │   ├──enabled
> + │   │   ├──power
> + │   │   │   ├──async
> + │   │   │   []
> + │   │   ├──subsystem -> ../../../../../../class/power_cap
> + │   │   └──uevent
> + │   ├──max_energy_range_uj
> + │   ├──max_power_range_uw
> + │   ├──name
> + │   ├──enabled
> + │   ├──power
> + │   │   ├──async
> + │   │   []
> + │   ├──subsystem -> ../../../../../class/power_cap
> + │   ├──enabled
> + │   ├──uevent
> + ├──intel-rapl:1
> + │   ├──constraint_0_name
> + │   ├──constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> + │   ├──constraint_0_time_window_us
> + │   ├──constraint_1_name
> + │   ├──constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> + │   ├──constraint_1_time_window_us
> + │   ├──device -> ../../intel-rapl
> + │   ├──energy_uj
> + │   ├──intel-rapl:1:0
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_name
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_time_window_us
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_name
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_time_window_us
> + │   │   ├──device -> ../../intel-rapl:1
> + │   │   ├──energy_uj
> + │   │   ├──max_energy_range_uj
> + │   │   ├──name
> + │   │   ├──enabled
> + │   │   ├──power
> + │   │   │   ├──async
> + │   │   │   []
> + │   │   ├──subsystem -> ../../../../../../class/power_cap
> + │   │   └──uevent
> + │   ├──intel-rapl:1:1
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_name
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> + │   │   ├──constraint_0_time_window_us
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_name
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> + │   │   ├──constraint_1_time_window_us
> + │   │   ├──device -> ../../intel-rapl:1
> + │   │   ├──energy_uj
> + │   │   ├──max_energy_range_uj
> + │   │   ├──name
> + │   │   ├──enabled
> + │   │   ├──power
> + │   │   │   ├──async
> + │   │   │   []
> + │   │   ├──subsystem -> ../../../../../../class/power_cap
> + │   │   └──uevent
> + │   ├──max_energy_range_uj
> + │   ├──max_power_range_uw
> + │   ├──name
> + │   ├──enabled
> + │   ├──power
> + │   │   ├──async
> + │   │   []
> + │   ├──subsystem -> ../../../../../class/power_cap
> + │   ├──uevent
> + ├──power
> + │   ├──async
> + │   []
> + ├──subsystem -> ../../../../class/power_cap
> + ├──enabled
> + └──uevent
> +
> +The above example illustrates a case in which the Intel RAPL technology,
> +available in Intel® IA-64 and IA-32 Processor Architectures, is used. There is one
> +control type called intel-rapl which contains two power zones, intel-rapl:0 and
> +intel-rapl:1, representing CPU packages. Each of these power zones contains
> +two subzones, intel-rapl:j:0 and intel-rapl:j:1 (j = 0, 1), representing the
> +"core" and the "uncore" parts of the given CPU package, respectively. All of
> +the zones and subzones contain energy monitoring attributes (energy_uj,
> +max_energy_range_uj) and constraint attributes (constraint_*) allowing controls
> +to be applied (the constraints in the 'package' power zones apply to the whole
> +CPU packages and the subzone constraints only apply to the respective parts of
> +the given package individually). Since Intel RAPL doesn't provide instantaneous
> +power value, there is no power_uw attribute.
> +
> +In addition to that, each power zone contains a name attribute, allowing the
> +part of the system represented by that zone to be identified.
> +For example::
> +
> + cat /sys/class/power_cap/intel-rapl/intel-rapl:0/name
> +
> +package-0
> +---------
> +
> +The Intel RAPL technology allows two constraints, short term and long term,
> +with two different time windows to be applied to each power zone. Thus for
> +each zone there are 2 attributes representing the constraint names, 2 power
> +limits and 2 attributes representing the sizes of the time windows. Such that,
> +constraint_j_* attributes correspond to the jth constraint (j = 0,1).
> +
> +For example::
> +
> + constraint_0_name
> + constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> + constraint_0_time_window_us
> + constraint_1_name
> + constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> + constraint_1_time_window_us
> +
> +Power Zone Attributes
> +=====================
> +
> +Monitoring attributes
> +---------------------
> +
> +energy_uj (rw)
> + Current energy counter in micro joules. Write "0" to reset.
> + If the counter can not be reset, then this attribute is read only.
> +
> +max_energy_range_uj (ro)
> + Range of the above energy counter in micro-joules.
> +
> +power_uw (ro)
> + Current power in micro watts.
> +
> +max_power_range_uw (ro)
> + Range of the above power value in micro-watts.
> +
> +name (ro)
> + Name of this power zone.
> +
> +It is possible that some domains have both power ranges and energy counter ranges;
> +however, only one is mandatory.
> +
> +Constraints
> +-----------
> +
> +constraint_X_power_limit_uw (rw)
> + Power limit in micro watts, which should be applicable for the
> + time window specified by "constraint_X_time_window_us".
> +
> +constraint_X_time_window_us (rw)
> + Time window in micro seconds.
> +
> +constraint_X_name (ro)
> + An optional name of the constraint
> +
> +constraint_X_max_power_uw(ro)
> + Maximum allowed power in micro watts.
> +
> +constraint_X_min_power_uw(ro)
> + Minimum allowed power in micro watts.
> +
> +constraint_X_max_time_window_us(ro)
> + Maximum allowed time window in micro seconds.
> +
> +constraint_X_min_time_window_us(ro)
> + Minimum allowed time window in micro seconds.
> +
> +Except power_limit_uw and time_window_us other fields are optional.
> +
> +Common zone and control type attributes
> +---------------------------------------
> +
> +enabled (rw): Enable/Disable controls at zone level or for all zones using
> +a control type.
> +
> +Power Cap Client Driver Interface
> +=================================
> +
> +The API summary:
> +
> +Call powercap_register_control_type() to register control type object.
> +Call powercap_register_zone() to register a power zone (under a given
> +control type), either as a top-level power zone or as a subzone of another
> +power zone registered earlier.
> +The number of constraints in a power zone and the corresponding callbacks have
> +to be defined prior to calling powercap_register_zone() to register that zone.
> +
> +To Free a power zone call powercap_unregister_zone().
> +To free a control type object call powercap_unregister_control_type().
> +Detailed API can be generated using kernel-doc on include/linux/powercap.h.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.txt b/Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.txt
> deleted file mode 100644
> index 1e6ef164e07a..000000000000
> --- a/Documentation/power/powercap/powercap.txt
> +++ /dev/null
> @@ -1,236 +0,0 @@
> -Power Capping Framework
> -==================================
> -
> -The power capping framework provides a consistent interface between the kernel
> -and the user space that allows power capping drivers to expose the settings to
> -user space in a uniform way.
> -
> -Terminology
> -=========================
> -The framework exposes power capping devices to user space via sysfs in the
> -form of a tree of objects. The objects at the root level of the tree represent
> -'control types', which correspond to different methods of power capping. For
> -example, the intel-rapl control type represents the Intel "Running Average
> -Power Limit" (RAPL) technology, whereas the 'idle-injection' control type
> -corresponds to the use of idle injection for controlling power.
> -
> -Power zones represent different parts of the system, which can be controlled and
> -monitored using the power capping method determined by the control type the
> -given zone belongs to. They each contain attributes for monitoring power, as
> -well as controls represented in the form of power constraints. If the parts of
> -the system represented by different power zones are hierarchical (that is, one
> -bigger part consists of multiple smaller parts that each have their own power
> -controls), those power zones may also be organized in a hierarchy with one
> -parent power zone containing multiple subzones and so on to reflect the power
> -control topology of the system. In that case, it is possible to apply power
> -capping to a set of devices together using the parent power zone and if more
> -fine grained control is required, it can be applied through the subzones.
> -
> -
> -Example sysfs interface tree:
> -
> -/sys/devices/virtual/powercap
> -??? intel-rapl
> - ??? intel-rapl:0
> - ?   ??? constraint_0_name
> - ?   ??? constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ??? constraint_0_time_window_us
> - ?   ??? constraint_1_name
> - ?   ??? constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ??? constraint_1_time_window_us
> - ?   ??? device -> ../../intel-rapl
> - ?   ??? energy_uj
> - ?   ??? intel-rapl:0:0
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_name
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_time_window_us
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_name
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_time_window_us
> - ?   ?   ??? device -> ../../intel-rapl:0
> - ?   ?   ??? energy_uj
> - ?   ?   ??? max_energy_range_uj
> - ?   ?   ??? name
> - ?   ?   ??? enabled
> - ?   ?   ??? power
> - ?   ?   ?   ??? async
> - ?   ?   ?   []
> - ?   ?   ??? subsystem -> ../../../../../../class/power_cap
> - ?   ?   ??? uevent
> - ?   ??? intel-rapl:0:1
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_name
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_time_window_us
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_name
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_time_window_us
> - ?   ?   ??? device -> ../../intel-rapl:0
> - ?   ?   ??? energy_uj
> - ?   ?   ??? max_energy_range_uj
> - ?   ?   ??? name
> - ?   ?   ??? enabled
> - ?   ?   ??? power
> - ?   ?   ?   ??? async
> - ?   ?   ?   []
> - ?   ?   ??? subsystem -> ../../../../../../class/power_cap
> - ?   ?   ??? uevent
> - ?   ??? max_energy_range_uj
> - ?   ??? max_power_range_uw
> - ?   ??? name
> - ?   ??? enabled
> - ?   ??? power
> - ?   ?   ??? async
> - ?   ?   []
> - ?   ??? subsystem -> ../../../../../class/power_cap
> - ?   ??? enabled
> - ?   ??? uevent
> - ??? intel-rapl:1
> - ?   ??? constraint_0_name
> - ?   ??? constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ??? constraint_0_time_window_us
> - ?   ??? constraint_1_name
> - ?   ??? constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ??? constraint_1_time_window_us
> - ?   ??? device -> ../../intel-rapl
> - ?   ??? energy_uj
> - ?   ??? intel-rapl:1:0
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_name
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_time_window_us
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_name
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_time_window_us
> - ?   ?   ??? device -> ../../intel-rapl:1
> - ?   ?   ??? energy_uj
> - ?   ?   ??? max_energy_range_uj
> - ?   ?   ??? name
> - ?   ?   ??? enabled
> - ?   ?   ??? power
> - ?   ?   ?   ??? async
> - ?   ?   ?   []
> - ?   ?   ??? subsystem -> ../../../../../../class/power_cap
> - ?   ?   ??? uevent
> - ?   ??? intel-rapl:1:1
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_name
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_0_time_window_us
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_name
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> - ?   ?   ??? constraint_1_time_window_us
> - ?   ?   ??? device -> ../../intel-rapl:1
> - ?   ?   ??? energy_uj
> - ?   ?   ??? max_energy_range_uj
> - ?   ?   ??? name
> - ?   ?   ??? enabled
> - ?   ?   ??? power
> - ?   ?   ?   ??? async
> - ?   ?   ?   []
> - ?   ?   ??? subsystem -> ../../../../../../class/power_cap
> - ?   ?   ??? uevent
> - ?   ??? max_energy_range_uj
> - ?   ??? max_power_range_uw
> - ?   ??? name
> - ?   ??? enabled
> - ?   ??? power
> - ?   ?   ??? async
> - ?   ?   []
> - ?   ??? subsystem -> ../../../../../class/power_cap
> - ?   ??? uevent
> - ??? power
> - ?   ??? async
> - ?   []
> - ??? subsystem -> ../../../../class/power_cap
> - ??? enabled
> - ??? uevent
> -
> -The above example illustrates a case in which the Intel RAPL technology,
> -available in Intel® IA-64 and IA-32 Processor Architectures, is used. There is one
> -control type called intel-rapl which contains two power zones, intel-rapl:0 and
> -intel-rapl:1, representing CPU packages. Each of these power zones contains
> -two subzones, intel-rapl:j:0 and intel-rapl:j:1 (j = 0, 1), representing the
> -"core" and the "uncore" parts of the given CPU package, respectively. All of
> -the zones and subzones contain energy monitoring attributes (energy_uj,
> -max_energy_range_uj) and constraint attributes (constraint_*) allowing controls
> -to be applied (the constraints in the 'package' power zones apply to the whole
> -CPU packages and the subzone constraints only apply to the respective parts of
> -the given package individually). Since Intel RAPL doesn't provide instantaneous
> -power value, there is no power_uw attribute.
> -
> -In addition to that, each power zone contains a name attribute, allowing the
> -part of the system represented by that zone to be identified.
> -For example:
> -
> -cat /sys/class/power_cap/intel-rapl/intel-rapl:0/name
> -package-0
> -
> -The Intel RAPL technology allows two constraints, short term and long term,
> -with two different time windows to be applied to each power zone. Thus for
> -each zone there are 2 attributes representing the constraint names, 2 power
> -limits and 2 attributes representing the sizes of the time windows. Such that,
> -constraint_j_* attributes correspond to the jth constraint (j = 0,1).
> -
> -For example:
> - constraint_0_name
> - constraint_0_power_limit_uw
> - constraint_0_time_window_us
> - constraint_1_name
> - constraint_1_power_limit_uw
> - constraint_1_time_window_us
> -
> -Power Zone Attributes
> -=================================
> -Monitoring attributes
> -----------------------
> -
> -energy_uj (rw): Current energy counter in micro joules. Write "0" to reset.
> -If the counter can not be reset, then this attribute is read only.
> -
> -max_energy_range_uj (ro): Range of the above energy counter in micro-joules.
> -
> -power_uw (ro): Current power in micro watts.
> -
> -max_power_range_uw (ro): Range of the above power value in micro-watts.
> -
> -name (ro): Name of this power zone.
> -
> -It is possible that some domains have both power ranges and energy counter ranges;
> -however, only one is mandatory.
> -
> -Constraints
> -----------------
> -constraint_X_power_limit_uw (rw): Power limit in micro watts, which should be
> -applicable for the time window specified by "constraint_X_time_window_us".
> -
> -constraint_X_time_window_us (rw): Time window in micro seconds.
> -
> -constraint_X_name (ro): An optional name of the constraint
> -
> -constraint_X_max_power_uw(ro): Maximum allowed power in micro watts.
> -
> -constraint_X_min_power_uw(ro): Minimum allowed power in micro watts.
> -
> -constraint_X_max_time_window_us(ro): Maximum allowed time window in micro seconds.
> -
> -constraint_X_min_time_window_us(ro): Minimum allowed time window in micro seconds.
> -
> -Except power_limit_uw and time_window_us other fields are optional.
> -
> -Common zone and control type attributes
> -----------------------------------------
> -enabled (rw): Enable/Disable controls at zone level or for all zones using
> -a control type.
> -
> -Power Cap Client Driver Interface
> -==================================
> -The API summary:
> -
> -Call powercap_register_control_type() to register control type object.
> -Call powercap_register_zone() to register a power zone (under a given
> -control type), either as a top-level power zone or as a subzone of another
> -power zone registered earlier.
> -The number of constraints in a power zone and the corresponding callbacks have
> -to be defined prior to calling powercap_register_zone() to register that zone.
> -
> -To Free a power zone call powercap_unregister_zone().
> -To free a control type object call powercap_unregister_control_type().
> -Detailed API can be generated using kernel-doc on include/linux/powercap.h.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/regulator/consumer.txt b/Documentation/power/regulator/consumer.rst
> similarity index 61%
> rename from Documentation/power/regulator/consumer.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/regulator/consumer.rst
> index e51564c1a140..0cd8cc1275a7 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/regulator/consumer.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/regulator/consumer.rst
> @@ -1,3 +1,4 @@
> +===================================
> Regulator Consumer Driver Interface
> ===================================
>
> @@ -8,73 +9,77 @@ Please see overview.txt for a description of the terms used in this text.
> 1. Consumer Regulator Access (static & dynamic drivers)
> =======================================================
>
> -A consumer driver can get access to its supply regulator by calling :-
> +A consumer driver can get access to its supply regulator by calling ::
>
> -regulator = regulator_get(dev, "Vcc");
> + regulator = regulator_get(dev, "Vcc");
>
> The consumer passes in its struct device pointer and power supply ID. The core
> then finds the correct regulator by consulting a machine specific lookup table.
> If the lookup is successful then this call will return a pointer to the struct
> regulator that supplies this consumer.
>
> -To release the regulator the consumer driver should call :-
> +To release the regulator the consumer driver should call ::
>
> -regulator_put(regulator);
> + regulator_put(regulator);
>
> Consumers can be supplied by more than one regulator e.g. codec consumer with
> -analog and digital supplies :-
> +analog and digital supplies ::
>
> -digital = regulator_get(dev, "Vcc"); /* digital core */
> -analog = regulator_get(dev, "Avdd"); /* analog */
> + digital = regulator_get(dev, "Vcc"); /* digital core */
> + analog = regulator_get(dev, "Avdd"); /* analog */
>
> The regulator access functions regulator_get() and regulator_put() will
> usually be called in your device drivers probe() and remove() respectively.
>
>
> 2. Regulator Output Enable & Disable (static & dynamic drivers)
> -====================================================================
> +===============================================================
>
> -A consumer can enable its power supply by calling:-
>
> -int regulator_enable(regulator);
> +A consumer can enable its power supply by calling::
>
> -NOTE: The supply may already be enabled before regulator_enabled() is called.
> -This may happen if the consumer shares the regulator or the regulator has been
> -previously enabled by bootloader or kernel board initialization code.
> + int regulator_enable(regulator);
>
> -A consumer can determine if a regulator is enabled by calling :-
> +NOTE:
> + The supply may already be enabled before regulator_enabled() is called.
> + This may happen if the consumer shares the regulator or the regulator has been
> + previously enabled by bootloader or kernel board initialization code.
>
> -int regulator_is_enabled(regulator);
> +A consumer can determine if a regulator is enabled by calling::
> +
> + int regulator_is_enabled(regulator);
>
> This will return > zero when the regulator is enabled.
>
>
> -A consumer can disable its supply when no longer needed by calling :-
> +A consumer can disable its supply when no longer needed by calling::
>
> -int regulator_disable(regulator);
> + int regulator_disable(regulator);
>
> -NOTE: This may not disable the supply if it's shared with other consumers. The
> -regulator will only be disabled when the enabled reference count is zero.
> +NOTE:
> + This may not disable the supply if it's shared with other consumers. The
> + regulator will only be disabled when the enabled reference count is zero.
>
> -Finally, a regulator can be forcefully disabled in the case of an emergency :-
> +Finally, a regulator can be forcefully disabled in the case of an emergency::
>
> -int regulator_force_disable(regulator);
> + int regulator_force_disable(regulator);
>
> -NOTE: this will immediately and forcefully shutdown the regulator output. All
> -consumers will be powered off.
> +NOTE:
> + this will immediately and forcefully shutdown the regulator output. All
> + consumers will be powered off.
>
>
> 3. Regulator Voltage Control & Status (dynamic drivers)
> -======================================================
> +=======================================================
>
> Some consumer drivers need to be able to dynamically change their supply
> voltage to match system operating points. e.g. CPUfreq drivers can scale
> voltage along with frequency to save power, SD drivers may need to select the
> correct card voltage, etc.
>
> -Consumers can control their supply voltage by calling :-
> +Consumers can control their supply voltage by calling::
>
> -int regulator_set_voltage(regulator, min_uV, max_uV);
> + int regulator_set_voltage(regulator, min_uV, max_uV);
>
> Where min_uV and max_uV are the minimum and maximum acceptable voltages in
> microvolts.
> @@ -84,47 +89,50 @@ when enabled, then the voltage changes instantly, otherwise the voltage
> configuration changes and the voltage is physically set when the regulator is
> next enabled.
>
> -The regulators configured voltage output can be found by calling :-
> +The regulators configured voltage output can be found by calling::
>
> -int regulator_get_voltage(regulator);
> + int regulator_get_voltage(regulator);
>
> -NOTE: get_voltage() will return the configured output voltage whether the
> -regulator is enabled or disabled and should NOT be used to determine regulator
> -output state. However this can be used in conjunction with is_enabled() to
> -determine the regulator physical output voltage.
> +NOTE:
> + get_voltage() will return the configured output voltage whether the
> + regulator is enabled or disabled and should NOT be used to determine regulator
> + output state. However this can be used in conjunction with is_enabled() to
> + determine the regulator physical output voltage.
>
>
> 4. Regulator Current Limit Control & Status (dynamic drivers)
> -===========================================================
> +=============================================================
>
> Some consumer drivers need to be able to dynamically change their supply
> current limit to match system operating points. e.g. LCD backlight driver can
> change the current limit to vary the backlight brightness, USB drivers may want
> to set the limit to 500mA when supplying power.
>
> -Consumers can control their supply current limit by calling :-
> +Consumers can control their supply current limit by calling::
>
> -int regulator_set_current_limit(regulator, min_uA, max_uA);
> + int regulator_set_current_limit(regulator, min_uA, max_uA);
>
> Where min_uA and max_uA are the minimum and maximum acceptable current limit in
> microamps.
>
> -NOTE: this can be called when the regulator is enabled or disabled. If called
> -when enabled, then the current limit changes instantly, otherwise the current
> -limit configuration changes and the current limit is physically set when the
> -regulator is next enabled.
> +NOTE:
> + this can be called when the regulator is enabled or disabled. If called
> + when enabled, then the current limit changes instantly, otherwise the current
> + limit configuration changes and the current limit is physically set when the
> + regulator is next enabled.
>
> -A regulators current limit can be found by calling :-
> +A regulators current limit can be found by calling::
>
> -int regulator_get_current_limit(regulator);
> + int regulator_get_current_limit(regulator);
>
> -NOTE: get_current_limit() will return the current limit whether the regulator
> -is enabled or disabled and should not be used to determine regulator current
> -load.
> +NOTE:
> + get_current_limit() will return the current limit whether the regulator
> + is enabled or disabled and should not be used to determine regulator current
> + load.
>
>
> 5. Regulator Operating Mode Control & Status (dynamic drivers)
> -=============================================================
> +==============================================================
>
> Some consumers can further save system power by changing the operating mode of
> their supply regulator to be more efficient when the consumers operating state
> @@ -135,9 +143,9 @@ Regulator operating mode can be changed indirectly or directly.
> Indirect operating mode control.
> --------------------------------
> Consumer drivers can request a change in their supply regulator operating mode
> -by calling :-
> +by calling::
>
> -int regulator_set_load(struct regulator *regulator, int load_uA);
> + int regulator_set_load(struct regulator *regulator, int load_uA);
>
> This will cause the core to recalculate the total load on the regulator (based
> on all its consumers) and change operating mode (if necessary and permitted)
> @@ -153,12 +161,13 @@ consumers.
>
> Direct operating mode control.
> ------------------------------
> +
> Bespoke or tightly coupled drivers may want to directly control regulator
> operating mode depending on their operating point. This can be achieved by
> -calling :-
> +calling::
>
> -int regulator_set_mode(struct regulator *regulator, unsigned int mode);
> -unsigned int regulator_get_mode(struct regulator *regulator);
> + int regulator_set_mode(struct regulator *regulator, unsigned int mode);
> + unsigned int regulator_get_mode(struct regulator *regulator);
>
> Direct mode will only be used by consumers that *know* about the regulator and
> are not sharing the regulator with other consumers.
> @@ -166,24 +175,26 @@ are not sharing the regulator with other consumers.
>
> 6. Regulator Events
> ===================
> +
> Regulators can notify consumers of external events. Events could be received by
> consumers under regulator stress or failure conditions.
>
> -Consumers can register interest in regulator events by calling :-
> +Consumers can register interest in regulator events by calling::
>
> -int regulator_register_notifier(struct regulator *regulator,
> - struct notifier_block *nb);
> + int regulator_register_notifier(struct regulator *regulator,
> + struct notifier_block *nb);
>
> -Consumers can unregister interest by calling :-
> +Consumers can unregister interest by calling::
>
> -int regulator_unregister_notifier(struct regulator *regulator,
> - struct notifier_block *nb);
> + int regulator_unregister_notifier(struct regulator *regulator,
> + struct notifier_block *nb);
>
> Regulators use the kernel notifier framework to send event to their interested
> consumers.
>
> 7. Regulator Direct Register Access
> ===================================
> +
> Some kinds of power management hardware or firmware are designed such that
> they need to do low-level hardware access to regulators, with no involvement
> from the kernel. Examples of such devices are:
> @@ -199,20 +210,20 @@ to it. The regulator framework provides the following helpers for querying
> these details.
>
> Bus-specific details, like I2C addresses or transfer rates are handled by the
> -regmap framework. To get the regulator's regmap (if supported), use :-
> +regmap framework. To get the regulator's regmap (if supported), use::
>
> -struct regmap *regulator_get_regmap(struct regulator *regulator);
> + struct regmap *regulator_get_regmap(struct regulator *regulator);
>
> To obtain the hardware register offset and bitmask for the regulator's voltage
> -selector register, use :-
> +selector register, use::
>
> -int regulator_get_hardware_vsel_register(struct regulator *regulator,
> - unsigned *vsel_reg,
> - unsigned *vsel_mask);
> + int regulator_get_hardware_vsel_register(struct regulator *regulator,
> + unsigned *vsel_reg,
> + unsigned *vsel_mask);
>
> To convert a regulator framework voltage selector code (used by
> regulator_list_voltage) to a hardware-specific voltage selector that can be
> -directly written to the voltage selector register, use :-
> +directly written to the voltage selector register, use::
>
> -int regulator_list_hardware_vsel(struct regulator *regulator,
> - unsigned selector);
> + int regulator_list_hardware_vsel(struct regulator *regulator,
> + unsigned selector);
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/regulator/design.txt b/Documentation/power/regulator/design.rst
> similarity index 86%
> rename from Documentation/power/regulator/design.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/regulator/design.rst
> index fdd919b96830..3b09c6841dc4 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/regulator/design.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/regulator/design.rst
> @@ -1,3 +1,4 @@
> +==========================
> Regulator API design notes
> ==========================
>
> @@ -14,7 +15,9 @@ Safety
> have different power requirements, and not all components with power
> requirements are visible to software.
>
> - => The API should make no changes to the hardware state unless it has
> +.. note::
> +
> + The API should make no changes to the hardware state unless it has
> specific knowledge that these changes are safe to perform on this
> particular system.
>
> @@ -28,6 +31,8 @@ Consumer use cases
> - Many of the power supplies in the system will be shared between many
> different consumers.
>
> - => The consumer API should be structured so that these use cases are
> +.. note::
> +
> + The consumer API should be structured so that these use cases are
> very easy to handle and so that consumers will work with shared
> supplies without any additional effort.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/regulator/machine.txt b/Documentation/power/regulator/machine.rst
> similarity index 75%
> rename from Documentation/power/regulator/machine.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/regulator/machine.rst
> index eff4dcaaa252..22fffefaa3ad 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/regulator/machine.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/regulator/machine.rst
> @@ -1,10 +1,11 @@
> +==================================
> Regulator Machine Driver Interface
> -===================================
> +==================================
>
> The regulator machine driver interface is intended for board/machine specific
> initialisation code to configure the regulator subsystem.
>
> -Consider the following machine :-
> +Consider the following machine::
>
> Regulator-1 -+-> Regulator-2 --> [Consumer A @ 1.8 - 2.0V]
> |
> @@ -13,31 +14,31 @@ Consider the following machine :-
> The drivers for consumers A & B must be mapped to the correct regulator in
> order to control their power supplies. This mapping can be achieved in machine
> initialisation code by creating a struct regulator_consumer_supply for
> -each regulator.
> +each regulator::
>
> -struct regulator_consumer_supply {
> + struct regulator_consumer_supply {
> const char *dev_name; /* consumer dev_name() */
> const char *supply; /* consumer supply - e.g. "vcc" */
> -};
> + };
>
> -e.g. for the machine above
> +e.g. for the machine above::
>
> -static struct regulator_consumer_supply regulator1_consumers[] = {
> + static struct regulator_consumer_supply regulator1_consumers[] = {
> REGULATOR_SUPPLY("Vcc", "consumer B"),
> -};
> + };
>
> -static struct regulator_consumer_supply regulator2_consumers[] = {
> + static struct regulator_consumer_supply regulator2_consumers[] = {
> REGULATOR_SUPPLY("Vcc", "consumer A"),
> -};
> + };
>
> This maps Regulator-1 to the 'Vcc' supply for Consumer B and maps Regulator-2
> to the 'Vcc' supply for Consumer A.
>
> Constraints can now be registered by defining a struct regulator_init_data
> for each regulator power domain. This structure also maps the consumers
> -to their supply regulators :-
> +to their supply regulators::
>
> -static struct regulator_init_data regulator1_data = {
> + static struct regulator_init_data regulator1_data = {
> .constraints = {
> .name = "Regulator-1",
> .min_uV = 3300000,
> @@ -46,7 +47,7 @@ static struct regulator_init_data regulator1_data = {
> },
> .num_consumer_supplies = ARRAY_SIZE(regulator1_consumers),
> .consumer_supplies = regulator1_consumers,
> -};
> + };
>
> The name field should be set to something that is usefully descriptive
> for the board for configuration of supplies for other regulators and
> @@ -57,9 +58,9 @@ name is provided then the subsystem will choose one.
> Regulator-1 supplies power to Regulator-2. This relationship must be registered
> with the core so that Regulator-1 is also enabled when Consumer A enables its
> supply (Regulator-2). The supply regulator is set by the supply_regulator
> -field below and co:-
> +field below and co::
>
> -static struct regulator_init_data regulator2_data = {
> + static struct regulator_init_data regulator2_data = {
> .supply_regulator = "Regulator-1",
> .constraints = {
> .min_uV = 1800000,
> @@ -69,11 +70,11 @@ static struct regulator_init_data regulator2_data = {
> },
> .num_consumer_supplies = ARRAY_SIZE(regulator2_consumers),
> .consumer_supplies = regulator2_consumers,
> -};
> + };
>
> -Finally the regulator devices must be registered in the usual manner.
> +Finally the regulator devices must be registered in the usual manner::
>
> -static struct platform_device regulator_devices[] = {
> + static struct platform_device regulator_devices[] = {
> {
> .name = "regulator",
> .id = DCDC_1,
> @@ -88,9 +89,9 @@ static struct platform_device regulator_devices[] = {
> .platform_data = &regulator2_data,
> },
> },
> -};
> -/* register regulator 1 device */
> -platform_device_register(&regulator_devices[0]);
> + };
> + /* register regulator 1 device */
> + platform_device_register(&regulator_devices[0]);
>
> -/* register regulator 2 device */
> -platform_device_register(&regulator_devices[1]);
> + /* register regulator 2 device */
> + platform_device_register(&regulator_devices[1]);
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/regulator/overview.txt b/Documentation/power/regulator/overview.rst
> similarity index 79%
> rename from Documentation/power/regulator/overview.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/regulator/overview.rst
> index 721b4739ec32..ee494c70a7c4 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/regulator/overview.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/regulator/overview.rst
> @@ -1,3 +1,4 @@
> +=============================================
> Linux voltage and current regulator framework
> =============================================
>
> @@ -13,26 +14,30 @@ regulators (where voltage output is controllable) and current sinks (where
> current limit is controllable).
>
> (C) 2008 Wolfson Microelectronics PLC.
> +
> Author: Liam Girdwood <lrg@slimlogic.co.uk>
>
>
> Nomenclature
> ============
>
> -Some terms used in this document:-
> +Some terms used in this document:
>
> - o Regulator - Electronic device that supplies power to other devices.
> + - Regulator
> + - Electronic device that supplies power to other devices.
> Most regulators can enable and disable their output while
> some can control their output voltage and or current.
>
> Input Voltage -> Regulator -> Output Voltage
>
>
> - o PMIC - Power Management IC. An IC that contains numerous regulators
> - and often contains other subsystems.
> + - PMIC
> + - Power Management IC. An IC that contains numerous
> + regulators and often contains other subsystems.
>
>
> - o Consumer - Electronic device that is supplied power by a regulator.
> + - Consumer
> + - Electronic device that is supplied power by a regulator.
> Consumers can be classified into two types:-
>
> Static: consumer does not change its supply voltage or
> @@ -44,46 +49,48 @@ Some terms used in this document:-
> current limit to meet operation demands.
>
>
> - o Power Domain - Electronic circuit that is supplied its input power by the
> + - Power Domain
> + - Electronic circuit that is supplied its input power by the
> output power of a regulator, switch or by another power
> domain.
>
> - The supply regulator may be behind a switch(s). i.e.
> + The supply regulator may be behind a switch(s). i.e.::
>
> - Regulator -+-> Switch-1 -+-> Switch-2 --> [Consumer A]
> - | |
> - | +-> [Consumer B], [Consumer C]
> - |
> - +-> [Consumer D], [Consumer E]
> + Regulator -+-> Switch-1 -+-> Switch-2 --> [Consumer A]
> + | |
> + | +-> [Consumer B], [Consumer C]
> + |
> + +-> [Consumer D], [Consumer E]
>
> That is one regulator and three power domains:
>
> - Domain 1: Switch-1, Consumers D & E.
> - Domain 2: Switch-2, Consumers B & C.
> - Domain 3: Consumer A.
> + - Domain 1: Switch-1, Consumers D & E.
> + - Domain 2: Switch-2, Consumers B & C.
> + - Domain 3: Consumer A.
>
> and this represents a "supplies" relationship:
>
> Domain-1 --> Domain-2 --> Domain-3.
>
> A power domain may have regulators that are supplied power
> - by other regulators. i.e.
> + by other regulators. i.e.::
>
> - Regulator-1 -+-> Regulator-2 -+-> [Consumer A]
> - |
> - +-> [Consumer B]
> + Regulator-1 -+-> Regulator-2 -+-> [Consumer A]
> + |
> + +-> [Consumer B]
>
> This gives us two regulators and two power domains:
>
> - Domain 1: Regulator-2, Consumer B.
> - Domain 2: Consumer A.
> + - Domain 1: Regulator-2, Consumer B.
> + - Domain 2: Consumer A.
>
> and a "supplies" relationship:
>
> Domain-1 --> Domain-2
>
>
> - o Constraints - Constraints are used to define power levels for performance
> + - Constraints
> + - Constraints are used to define power levels for performance
> and hardware protection. Constraints exist at three levels:
>
> Regulator Level: This is defined by the regulator hardware
> @@ -141,7 +148,7 @@ relevant to non SoC devices and is split into the following four interfaces:-
> limit. This also compiles out if not in use so drivers can be reused in
> systems with no regulator based power control.
>
> - See Documentation/power/regulator/consumer.txt
> + See Documentation/power/regulator/consumer.rst
>
> 2. Regulator driver interface.
>
> @@ -149,7 +156,7 @@ relevant to non SoC devices and is split into the following four interfaces:-
> operations to the core. It also has a notifier call chain for propagating
> regulator events to clients.
>
> - See Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.txt
> + See Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.rst
>
> 3. Machine interface.
>
> @@ -160,7 +167,7 @@ relevant to non SoC devices and is split into the following four interfaces:-
> allows the creation of a regulator tree whereby some regulators are
> supplied by others (similar to a clock tree).
>
> - See Documentation/power/regulator/machine.txt
> + See Documentation/power/regulator/machine.rst
>
> 4. Userspace ABI.
>
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.rst b/Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.rst
> new file mode 100644
> index 000000000000..794b3256fbb9
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.rst
> @@ -0,0 +1,32 @@
> +==========================
> +Regulator Driver Interface
> +==========================
> +
> +The regulator driver interface is relatively simple and designed to allow
> +regulator drivers to register their services with the core framework.
> +
> +
> +Registration
> +============
> +
> +Drivers can register a regulator by calling::
> +
> + struct regulator_dev *regulator_register(struct regulator_desc *regulator_desc,
> + const struct regulator_config *config);
> +
> +This will register the regulator's capabilities and operations to the regulator
> +core.
> +
> +Regulators can be unregistered by calling::
> +
> + void regulator_unregister(struct regulator_dev *rdev);
> +
> +
> +Regulator Events
> +================
> +
> +Regulators can send events (e.g. overtemperature, undervoltage, etc) to
> +consumer drivers by calling::
> +
> + int regulator_notifier_call_chain(struct regulator_dev *rdev,
> + unsigned long event, void *data);
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.txt b/Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.txt
> deleted file mode 100644
> index b17e5833ce21..000000000000
> --- a/Documentation/power/regulator/regulator.txt
> +++ /dev/null
> @@ -1,30 +0,0 @@
> -Regulator Driver Interface
> -==========================
> -
> -The regulator driver interface is relatively simple and designed to allow
> -regulator drivers to register their services with the core framework.
> -
> -
> -Registration
> -============
> -
> -Drivers can register a regulator by calling :-
> -
> -struct regulator_dev *regulator_register(struct regulator_desc *regulator_desc,
> - const struct regulator_config *config);
> -
> -This will register the regulator's capabilities and operations to the regulator
> -core.
> -
> -Regulators can be unregistered by calling :-
> -
> -void regulator_unregister(struct regulator_dev *rdev);
> -
> -
> -Regulator Events
> -================
> -Regulators can send events (e.g. overtemperature, undervoltage, etc) to
> -consumer drivers by calling :-
> -
> -int regulator_notifier_call_chain(struct regulator_dev *rdev,
> - unsigned long event, void *data);
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt b/Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst
> similarity index 89%
> rename from Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst
> index 937e33c46211..2c2ec99b5088 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst
> @@ -1,10 +1,15 @@
> +==================================================
> Runtime Power Management Framework for I/O Devices
> +==================================================
>
> (C) 2009-2011 Rafael J. Wysocki <rjw@sisk.pl>, Novell Inc.
> +
> (C) 2010 Alan Stern <stern@rowland.harvard.edu>
> +
> (C) 2014 Intel Corp., Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
>
> 1. Introduction
> +===============
>
> Support for runtime power management (runtime PM) of I/O devices is provided
> at the power management core (PM core) level by means of:
> @@ -33,16 +38,17 @@ fields of 'struct dev_pm_info' and the core helper functions provided for
> runtime PM are described below.
>
> 2. Device Runtime PM Callbacks
> +==============================
>
> -There are three device runtime PM callbacks defined in 'struct dev_pm_ops':
> +There are three device runtime PM callbacks defined in 'struct dev_pm_ops'::
>
> -struct dev_pm_ops {
> + struct dev_pm_ops {
> ...
> int (*runtime_suspend)(struct device *dev);
> int (*runtime_resume)(struct device *dev);
> int (*runtime_idle)(struct device *dev);
> ...
> -};
> + };
>
> The ->runtime_suspend(), ->runtime_resume() and ->runtime_idle() callbacks
> are executed by the PM core for the device's subsystem that may be either of
> @@ -112,7 +118,7 @@ low-power state during the execution of the suspend callback, it is expected
> that remote wakeup will be enabled for the device. Generally, remote wakeup
> should be enabled for all input devices put into low-power states at run time.
>
> -The subsystem-level resume callback, if present, is _entirely_ _responsible_ for
> +The subsystem-level resume callback, if present, is **entirely responsible** for
> handling the resume of the device as appropriate, which may, but need not
> include executing the device driver's own ->runtime_resume() callback (from the
> PM core's point of view it is not necessary to implement a ->runtime_resume()
> @@ -197,95 +203,96 @@ rules:
> except for scheduled autosuspends.
>
> 3. Runtime PM Device Fields
> +===========================
>
> The following device runtime PM fields are present in 'struct dev_pm_info', as
> defined in include/linux/pm.h:
>
> - struct timer_list suspend_timer;
> + `struct timer_list suspend_timer;`
> - timer used for scheduling (delayed) suspend and autosuspend requests
>
> - unsigned long timer_expires;
> + `unsigned long timer_expires;`
> - timer expiration time, in jiffies (if this is different from zero, the
> timer is running and will expire at that time, otherwise the timer is not
> running)
>
> - struct work_struct work;
> + `struct work_struct work;`
> - work structure used for queuing up requests (i.e. work items in pm_wq)
>
> - wait_queue_head_t wait_queue;
> + `wait_queue_head_t wait_queue;`
> - wait queue used if any of the helper functions needs to wait for another
> one to complete
>
> - spinlock_t lock;
> + `spinlock_t lock;`
> - lock used for synchronization
>
> - atomic_t usage_count;
> + `atomic_t usage_count;`
> - the usage counter of the device
>
> - atomic_t child_count;
> + `atomic_t child_count;`
> - the count of 'active' children of the device
>
> - unsigned int ignore_children;
> + `unsigned int ignore_children;`
> - if set, the value of child_count is ignored (but still updated)
>
> - unsigned int disable_depth;
> + `unsigned int disable_depth;`
> - used for disabling the helper functions (they work normally if this is
> equal to zero); the initial value of it is 1 (i.e. runtime PM is
> initially disabled for all devices)
>
> - int runtime_error;
> + `int runtime_error;`
> - if set, there was a fatal error (one of the callbacks returned error code
> as described in Section 2), so the helper functions will not work until
> this flag is cleared; this is the error code returned by the failing
> callback
>
> - unsigned int idle_notification;
> + `unsigned int idle_notification;`
> - if set, ->runtime_idle() is being executed
>
> - unsigned int request_pending;
> + `unsigned int request_pending;`
> - if set, there's a pending request (i.e. a work item queued up into pm_wq)
>
> - enum rpm_request request;
> + `enum rpm_request request;`
> - type of request that's pending (valid if request_pending is set)
>
> - unsigned int deferred_resume;
> + `unsigned int deferred_resume;`
> - set if ->runtime_resume() is about to be run while ->runtime_suspend() is
> being executed for that device and it is not practical to wait for the
> suspend to complete; means "start a resume as soon as you've suspended"
>
> - enum rpm_status runtime_status;
> + `enum rpm_status runtime_status;`
> - the runtime PM status of the device; this field's initial value is
> RPM_SUSPENDED, which means that each device is initially regarded by the
> PM core as 'suspended', regardless of its real hardware status
>
> - unsigned int runtime_auto;
> + `unsigned int runtime_auto;`
> - if set, indicates that the user space has allowed the device driver to
> power manage the device at run time via the /sys/devices/.../power/control
> - interface; it may only be modified with the help of the pm_runtime_allow()
> + `interface;` it may only be modified with the help of the pm_runtime_allow()
> and pm_runtime_forbid() helper functions
>
> - unsigned int no_callbacks;
> + `unsigned int no_callbacks;`
> - indicates that the device does not use the runtime PM callbacks (see
> Section 8); it may be modified only by the pm_runtime_no_callbacks()
> helper function
>
> - unsigned int irq_safe;
> + `unsigned int irq_safe;`
> - indicates that the ->runtime_suspend() and ->runtime_resume() callbacks
> will be invoked with the spinlock held and interrupts disabled
>
> - unsigned int use_autosuspend;
> + `unsigned int use_autosuspend;`
> - indicates that the device's driver supports delayed autosuspend (see
> Section 9); it may be modified only by the
> pm_runtime{_dont}_use_autosuspend() helper functions
>
> - unsigned int timer_autosuspends;
> + `unsigned int timer_autosuspends;`
> - indicates that the PM core should attempt to carry out an autosuspend
> when the timer expires rather than a normal suspend
>
> - int autosuspend_delay;
> + `int autosuspend_delay;`
> - the delay time (in milliseconds) to be used for autosuspend
>
> - unsigned long last_busy;
> + `unsigned long last_busy;`
> - the time (in jiffies) when the pm_runtime_mark_last_busy() helper
> function was last called for this device; used in calculating inactivity
> periods for autosuspend
> @@ -293,37 +300,38 @@ defined in include/linux/pm.h:
> All of the above fields are members of the 'power' member of 'struct device'.
>
> 4. Runtime PM Device Helper Functions
> +=====================================
>
> The following runtime PM helper functions are defined in
> drivers/base/power/runtime.c and include/linux/pm_runtime.h:
>
> - void pm_runtime_init(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_init(struct device *dev);`
> - initialize the device runtime PM fields in 'struct dev_pm_info'
>
> - void pm_runtime_remove(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_remove(struct device *dev);`
> - make sure that the runtime PM of the device will be disabled after
> removing the device from device hierarchy
>
> - int pm_runtime_idle(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_idle(struct device *dev);`
> - execute the subsystem-level idle callback for the device; returns an
> error code on failure, where -EINPROGRESS means that ->runtime_idle() is
> already being executed; if there is no callback or the callback returns 0
> then run pm_runtime_autosuspend(dev) and return its result
>
> - int pm_runtime_suspend(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_suspend(struct device *dev);`
> - execute the subsystem-level suspend callback for the device; returns 0 on
> success, 1 if the device's runtime PM status was already 'suspended', or
> error code on failure, where -EAGAIN or -EBUSY means it is safe to attempt
> to suspend the device again in future and -EACCES means that
> 'power.disable_depth' is different from 0
>
> - int pm_runtime_autosuspend(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_autosuspend(struct device *dev);`
> - same as pm_runtime_suspend() except that the autosuspend delay is taken
> - into account; if pm_runtime_autosuspend_expiration() says the delay has
> + `into account;` if pm_runtime_autosuspend_expiration() says the delay has
> not yet expired then an autosuspend is scheduled for the appropriate time
> and 0 is returned
>
> - int pm_runtime_resume(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_resume(struct device *dev);`
> - execute the subsystem-level resume callback for the device; returns 0 on
> success, 1 if the device's runtime PM status was already 'active' or
> error code on failure, where -EAGAIN means it may be safe to attempt to
> @@ -331,17 +339,17 @@ drivers/base/power/runtime.c and include/linux/pm_runtime.h:
> checked additionally, and -EACCES means that 'power.disable_depth' is
> different from 0
>
> - int pm_request_idle(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_request_idle(struct device *dev);`
> - submit a request to execute the subsystem-level idle callback for the
> device (the request is represented by a work item in pm_wq); returns 0 on
> success or error code if the request has not been queued up
>
> - int pm_request_autosuspend(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_request_autosuspend(struct device *dev);`
> - schedule the execution of the subsystem-level suspend callback for the
> device when the autosuspend delay has expired; if the delay has already
> expired then the work item is queued up immediately
>
> - int pm_schedule_suspend(struct device *dev, unsigned int delay);
> + `int pm_schedule_suspend(struct device *dev, unsigned int delay);`
> - schedule the execution of the subsystem-level suspend callback for the
> device in future, where 'delay' is the time to wait before queuing up a
> suspend work item in pm_wq, in milliseconds (if 'delay' is zero, the work
> @@ -351,58 +359,58 @@ drivers/base/power/runtime.c and include/linux/pm_runtime.h:
> ->runtime_suspend() is already scheduled and not yet expired, the new
> value of 'delay' will be used as the time to wait
>
> - int pm_request_resume(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_request_resume(struct device *dev);`
> - submit a request to execute the subsystem-level resume callback for the
> device (the request is represented by a work item in pm_wq); returns 0 on
> success, 1 if the device's runtime PM status was already 'active', or
> error code if the request hasn't been queued up
>
> - void pm_runtime_get_noresume(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_get_noresume(struct device *dev);`
> - increment the device's usage counter
>
> - int pm_runtime_get(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_get(struct device *dev);`
> - increment the device's usage counter, run pm_request_resume(dev) and
> return its result
>
> - int pm_runtime_get_sync(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_get_sync(struct device *dev);`
> - increment the device's usage counter, run pm_runtime_resume(dev) and
> return its result
>
> - int pm_runtime_get_if_in_use(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_get_if_in_use(struct device *dev);`
> - return -EINVAL if 'power.disable_depth' is nonzero; otherwise, if the
> runtime PM status is RPM_ACTIVE and the runtime PM usage counter is
> nonzero, increment the counter and return 1; otherwise return 0 without
> changing the counter
>
> - void pm_runtime_put_noidle(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_put_noidle(struct device *dev);`
> - decrement the device's usage counter
>
> - int pm_runtime_put(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_put(struct device *dev);`
> - decrement the device's usage counter; if the result is 0 then run
> pm_request_idle(dev) and return its result
>
> - int pm_runtime_put_autosuspend(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_put_autosuspend(struct device *dev);`
> - decrement the device's usage counter; if the result is 0 then run
> pm_request_autosuspend(dev) and return its result
>
> - int pm_runtime_put_sync(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_put_sync(struct device *dev);`
> - decrement the device's usage counter; if the result is 0 then run
> pm_runtime_idle(dev) and return its result
>
> - int pm_runtime_put_sync_suspend(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_put_sync_suspend(struct device *dev);`
> - decrement the device's usage counter; if the result is 0 then run
> pm_runtime_suspend(dev) and return its result
>
> - int pm_runtime_put_sync_autosuspend(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_put_sync_autosuspend(struct device *dev);`
> - decrement the device's usage counter; if the result is 0 then run
> pm_runtime_autosuspend(dev) and return its result
>
> - void pm_runtime_enable(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_enable(struct device *dev);`
> - decrement the device's 'power.disable_depth' field; if that field is equal
> to zero, the runtime PM helper functions can execute subsystem-level
> callbacks described in Section 2 for the device
>
> - int pm_runtime_disable(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_disable(struct device *dev);`
> - increment the device's 'power.disable_depth' field (if the value of that
> field was previously zero, this prevents subsystem-level runtime PM
> callbacks from being run for the device), make sure that all of the
> @@ -411,7 +419,7 @@ drivers/base/power/runtime.c and include/linux/pm_runtime.h:
> necessary to execute the subsystem-level resume callback for the device
> to satisfy that request, otherwise 0 is returned
>
> - int pm_runtime_barrier(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_barrier(struct device *dev);`
> - check if there's a resume request pending for the device and resume it
> (synchronously) in that case, cancel any other pending runtime PM requests
> regarding it and wait for all runtime PM operations on it in progress to
> @@ -419,10 +427,10 @@ drivers/base/power/runtime.c and include/linux/pm_runtime.h:
> necessary to execute the subsystem-level resume callback for the device to
> satisfy that request, otherwise 0 is returned
>
> - void pm_suspend_ignore_children(struct device *dev, bool enable);
> + `void pm_suspend_ignore_children(struct device *dev, bool enable);`
> - set/unset the power.ignore_children flag of the device
>
> - int pm_runtime_set_active(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_runtime_set_active(struct device *dev);`
> - clear the device's 'power.runtime_error' flag, set the device's runtime
> PM status to 'active' and update its parent's counter of 'active'
> children as appropriate (it is only valid to use this function if
> @@ -430,61 +438,61 @@ drivers/base/power/runtime.c and include/linux/pm_runtime.h:
> zero); it will fail and return error code if the device has a parent
> which is not active and the 'power.ignore_children' flag of which is unset
>
> - void pm_runtime_set_suspended(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_set_suspended(struct device *dev);`
> - clear the device's 'power.runtime_error' flag, set the device's runtime
> PM status to 'suspended' and update its parent's counter of 'active'
> children as appropriate (it is only valid to use this function if
> 'power.runtime_error' is set or 'power.disable_depth' is greater than
> zero)
>
> - bool pm_runtime_active(struct device *dev);
> + `bool pm_runtime_active(struct device *dev);`
> - return true if the device's runtime PM status is 'active' or its
> 'power.disable_depth' field is not equal to zero, or false otherwise
>
> - bool pm_runtime_suspended(struct device *dev);
> + `bool pm_runtime_suspended(struct device *dev);`
> - return true if the device's runtime PM status is 'suspended' and its
> 'power.disable_depth' field is equal to zero, or false otherwise
>
> - bool pm_runtime_status_suspended(struct device *dev);
> + `bool pm_runtime_status_suspended(struct device *dev);`
> - return true if the device's runtime PM status is 'suspended'
>
> - void pm_runtime_allow(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_allow(struct device *dev);`
> - set the power.runtime_auto flag for the device and decrease its usage
> counter (used by the /sys/devices/.../power/control interface to
> effectively allow the device to be power managed at run time)
>
> - void pm_runtime_forbid(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_forbid(struct device *dev);`
> - unset the power.runtime_auto flag for the device and increase its usage
> counter (used by the /sys/devices/.../power/control interface to
> effectively prevent the device from being power managed at run time)
>
> - void pm_runtime_no_callbacks(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_no_callbacks(struct device *dev);`
> - set the power.no_callbacks flag for the device and remove the runtime
> PM attributes from /sys/devices/.../power (or prevent them from being
> added when the device is registered)
>
> - void pm_runtime_irq_safe(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_irq_safe(struct device *dev);`
> - set the power.irq_safe flag for the device, causing the runtime-PM
> callbacks to be invoked with interrupts off
>
> - bool pm_runtime_is_irq_safe(struct device *dev);
> + `bool pm_runtime_is_irq_safe(struct device *dev);`
> - return true if power.irq_safe flag was set for the device, causing
> the runtime-PM callbacks to be invoked with interrupts off
>
> - void pm_runtime_mark_last_busy(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_mark_last_busy(struct device *dev);`
> - set the power.last_busy field to the current time
>
> - void pm_runtime_use_autosuspend(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_use_autosuspend(struct device *dev);`
> - set the power.use_autosuspend flag, enabling autosuspend delays; call
> pm_runtime_get_sync if the flag was previously cleared and
> power.autosuspend_delay is negative
>
> - void pm_runtime_dont_use_autosuspend(struct device *dev);
> + `void pm_runtime_dont_use_autosuspend(struct device *dev);`
> - clear the power.use_autosuspend flag, disabling autosuspend delays;
> decrement the device's usage counter if the flag was previously set and
> power.autosuspend_delay is negative; call pm_runtime_idle
>
> - void pm_runtime_set_autosuspend_delay(struct device *dev, int delay);
> + `void pm_runtime_set_autosuspend_delay(struct device *dev, int delay);`
> - set the power.autosuspend_delay value to 'delay' (expressed in
> milliseconds); if 'delay' is negative then runtime suspends are
> prevented; if power.use_autosuspend is set, pm_runtime_get_sync may be
> @@ -493,7 +501,7 @@ drivers/base/power/runtime.c and include/linux/pm_runtime.h:
> changed to or from a negative value; if power.use_autosuspend is clear,
> pm_runtime_idle is called
>
> - unsigned long pm_runtime_autosuspend_expiration(struct device *dev);
> + `unsigned long pm_runtime_autosuspend_expiration(struct device *dev);`
> - calculate the time when the current autosuspend delay period will expire,
> based on power.last_busy and power.autosuspend_delay; if the delay time
> is 1000 ms or larger then the expiration time is rounded up to the
> @@ -503,36 +511,37 @@ drivers/base/power/runtime.c and include/linux/pm_runtime.h:
>
> It is safe to execute the following helper functions from interrupt context:
>
> -pm_request_idle()
> -pm_request_autosuspend()
> -pm_schedule_suspend()
> -pm_request_resume()
> -pm_runtime_get_noresume()
> -pm_runtime_get()
> -pm_runtime_put_noidle()
> -pm_runtime_put()
> -pm_runtime_put_autosuspend()
> -pm_runtime_enable()
> -pm_suspend_ignore_children()
> -pm_runtime_set_active()
> -pm_runtime_set_suspended()
> -pm_runtime_suspended()
> -pm_runtime_mark_last_busy()
> -pm_runtime_autosuspend_expiration()
> +- pm_request_idle()
> +- pm_request_autosuspend()
> +- pm_schedule_suspend()
> +- pm_request_resume()
> +- pm_runtime_get_noresume()
> +- pm_runtime_get()
> +- pm_runtime_put_noidle()
> +- pm_runtime_put()
> +- pm_runtime_put_autosuspend()
> +- pm_runtime_enable()
> +- pm_suspend_ignore_children()
> +- pm_runtime_set_active()
> +- pm_runtime_set_suspended()
> +- pm_runtime_suspended()
> +- pm_runtime_mark_last_busy()
> +- pm_runtime_autosuspend_expiration()
>
> If pm_runtime_irq_safe() has been called for a device then the following helper
> functions may also be used in interrupt context:
>
> -pm_runtime_idle()
> -pm_runtime_suspend()
> -pm_runtime_autosuspend()
> -pm_runtime_resume()
> -pm_runtime_get_sync()
> -pm_runtime_put_sync()
> -pm_runtime_put_sync_suspend()
> -pm_runtime_put_sync_autosuspend()
> +- pm_runtime_idle()
> +- pm_runtime_suspend()
> +- pm_runtime_autosuspend()
> +- pm_runtime_resume()
> +- pm_runtime_get_sync()
> +- pm_runtime_put_sync()
> +- pm_runtime_put_sync_suspend()
> +- pm_runtime_put_sync_autosuspend()
>
> 5. Runtime PM Initialization, Device Probing and Removal
> +========================================================
>
> Initially, the runtime PM is disabled for all devices, which means that the
> majority of the runtime PM helper functions described in Section 4 will return
> @@ -608,6 +617,7 @@ manage the device at run time, the driver may confuse it by using
> pm_runtime_forbid() this way.
>
> 6. Runtime PM and System Sleep
> +==============================
>
> Runtime PM and system sleep (i.e., system suspend and hibernation, also known
> as suspend-to-RAM and suspend-to-disk) interact with each other in a couple of
> @@ -647,9 +657,9 @@ brought back to full power during resume, then its runtime PM status will have
> to be updated to reflect the actual post-system sleep status. The way to do
> this is:
>
> - pm_runtime_disable(dev);
> - pm_runtime_set_active(dev);
> - pm_runtime_enable(dev);
> + - pm_runtime_disable(dev);
> + - pm_runtime_set_active(dev);
> + - pm_runtime_enable(dev);
>
> The PM core always increments the runtime usage counter before calling the
> ->suspend() callback and decrements it after calling the ->resume() callback.
> @@ -705,66 +715,66 @@ Subsystems may wish to conserve code space by using the set of generic power
> management callbacks provided by the PM core, defined in
> driver/base/power/generic_ops.c:
>
> - int pm_generic_runtime_suspend(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_runtime_suspend(struct device *dev);`
> - invoke the ->runtime_suspend() callback provided by the driver of this
> device and return its result, or return 0 if not defined
>
> - int pm_generic_runtime_resume(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_runtime_resume(struct device *dev);`
> - invoke the ->runtime_resume() callback provided by the driver of this
> device and return its result, or return 0 if not defined
>
> - int pm_generic_suspend(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_suspend(struct device *dev);`
> - if the device has not been suspended at run time, invoke the ->suspend()
> callback provided by its driver and return its result, or return 0 if not
> defined
>
> - int pm_generic_suspend_noirq(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_suspend_noirq(struct device *dev);`
> - if pm_runtime_suspended(dev) returns "false", invoke the ->suspend_noirq()
> callback provided by the device's driver and return its result, or return
> 0 if not defined
>
> - int pm_generic_resume(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_resume(struct device *dev);`
> - invoke the ->resume() callback provided by the driver of this device and,
> if successful, change the device's runtime PM status to 'active'
>
> - int pm_generic_resume_noirq(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_resume_noirq(struct device *dev);`
> - invoke the ->resume_noirq() callback provided by the driver of this device
>
> - int pm_generic_freeze(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_freeze(struct device *dev);`
> - if the device has not been suspended at run time, invoke the ->freeze()
> callback provided by its driver and return its result, or return 0 if not
> defined
>
> - int pm_generic_freeze_noirq(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_freeze_noirq(struct device *dev);`
> - if pm_runtime_suspended(dev) returns "false", invoke the ->freeze_noirq()
> callback provided by the device's driver and return its result, or return
> 0 if not defined
>
> - int pm_generic_thaw(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_thaw(struct device *dev);`
> - if the device has not been suspended at run time, invoke the ->thaw()
> callback provided by its driver and return its result, or return 0 if not
> defined
>
> - int pm_generic_thaw_noirq(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_thaw_noirq(struct device *dev);`
> - if pm_runtime_suspended(dev) returns "false", invoke the ->thaw_noirq()
> callback provided by the device's driver and return its result, or return
> 0 if not defined
>
> - int pm_generic_poweroff(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_poweroff(struct device *dev);`
> - if the device has not been suspended at run time, invoke the ->poweroff()
> callback provided by its driver and return its result, or return 0 if not
> defined
>
> - int pm_generic_poweroff_noirq(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_poweroff_noirq(struct device *dev);`
> - if pm_runtime_suspended(dev) returns "false", run the ->poweroff_noirq()
> callback provided by the device's driver and return its result, or return
> 0 if not defined
>
> - int pm_generic_restore(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_restore(struct device *dev);`
> - invoke the ->restore() callback provided by the driver of this device and,
> if successful, change the device's runtime PM status to 'active'
>
> - int pm_generic_restore_noirq(struct device *dev);
> + `int pm_generic_restore_noirq(struct device *dev);`
> - invoke the ->restore_noirq() callback provided by the device's driver
>
> These functions are the defaults used by the PM core, if a subsystem doesn't
> @@ -781,6 +791,7 @@ UNIVERSAL_DEV_PM_OPS macro defined in include/linux/pm.h (possibly setting its
> last argument to NULL).
>
> 8. "No-Callback" Devices
> +========================
>
> Some "devices" are only logical sub-devices of their parent and cannot be
> power-managed on their own. (The prototype example is a USB interface. Entire
> @@ -807,6 +818,7 @@ parent must take responsibility for telling the device's driver when the
> parent's power state changes.
>
> 9. Autosuspend, or automatically-delayed suspends
> +=================================================
>
> Changing a device's power state isn't free; it requires both time and energy.
> A device should be put in a low-power state only when there's some reason to
> @@ -832,8 +844,8 @@ registration the length should be controlled by user space, using the
>
> In order to use autosuspend, subsystems or drivers must call
> pm_runtime_use_autosuspend() (preferably before registering the device), and
> -thereafter they should use the various *_autosuspend() helper functions instead
> -of the non-autosuspend counterparts:
> +thereafter they should use the various `*_autosuspend()` helper functions
> +instead of the non-autosuspend counterparts::
>
> Instead of: pm_runtime_suspend use: pm_runtime_autosuspend;
> Instead of: pm_schedule_suspend use: pm_request_autosuspend;
> @@ -858,7 +870,7 @@ The implementation is well suited for asynchronous use in interrupt contexts.
> However such use inevitably involves races, because the PM core can't
> synchronize ->runtime_suspend() callbacks with the arrival of I/O requests.
> This synchronization must be handled by the driver, using its private lock.
> -Here is a schematic pseudo-code example:
> +Here is a schematic pseudo-code example::
>
> foo_read_or_write(struct foo_priv *foo, void *data)
> {
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/s2ram.txt b/Documentation/power/s2ram.rst
> similarity index 92%
> rename from Documentation/power/s2ram.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/s2ram.rst
> index 4685aee197fd..d739aa7c742c 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/s2ram.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/s2ram.rst
> @@ -1,7 +1,9 @@
> - How to get s2ram working
> - ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> - 2006 Linus Torvalds
> - 2006 Pavel Machek
> +========================
> +How to get s2ram working
> +========================
> +
> +2006 Linus Torvalds
> +2006 Pavel Machek
>
> 1) Check suspend.sf.net, program s2ram there has long whitelist of
> "known ok" machines, along with tricks to use on each one.
> @@ -12,8 +14,8 @@
>
> 3) You can use Linus' TRACE_RESUME infrastructure, described below.
>
> - Using TRACE_RESUME
> - ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> +Using TRACE_RESUME
> +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> I've been working at making the machines I have able to STR, and almost
> always it's a driver that is buggy. Thank God for the suspend/resume
> @@ -27,7 +29,7 @@ machine that doesn't boot) is:
>
> - enable PM_DEBUG, and PM_TRACE
>
> - - use a script like this:
> + - use a script like this::
>
> #!/bin/sh
> sync
> @@ -38,7 +40,7 @@ machine that doesn't boot) is:
>
> - if it doesn't come back up (which is usually the problem), reboot by
> holding the power button down, and look at the dmesg output for things
> - like
> + like::
>
> Magic number: 4:156:725
> hash matches drivers/base/power/resume.c:28
> @@ -52,7 +54,7 @@ machine that doesn't boot) is:
> If no device matches the hash (or any matches appear to be false positives),
> the culprit may be a device from a loadable kernel module that is not loaded
> until after the hash is checked. You can check the hash against the current
> - devices again after more modules are loaded using sysfs:
> + devices again after more modules are loaded using sysfs::
>
> cat /sys/power/pm_trace_dev_match
>
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/suspend-and-cpuhotplug.txt b/Documentation/power/suspend-and-cpuhotplug.rst
> similarity index 90%
> rename from Documentation/power/suspend-and-cpuhotplug.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/suspend-and-cpuhotplug.rst
> index a8751b8df10e..9df664f5423a 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/suspend-and-cpuhotplug.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/suspend-and-cpuhotplug.rst
> @@ -1,10 +1,15 @@
> +====================================================================
> Interaction of Suspend code (S3) with the CPU hotplug infrastructure
> +====================================================================
>
> - (C) 2011 - 2014 Srivatsa S. Bhat <srivatsa.bhat@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
> +(C) 2011 - 2014 Srivatsa S. Bhat <srivatsa.bhat@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
>
>
> -I. How does the regular CPU hotplug code differ from how the Suspend-to-RAM
> - infrastructure uses it internally? And where do they share common code?
> +I. Differences between CPU hotplug and Suspend-to-RAM
> +======================================================
> +
> +How does the regular CPU hotplug code differ from how the Suspend-to-RAM
> +infrastructure uses it internally? And where do they share common code?
>
> Well, a picture is worth a thousand words... So ASCII art follows :-)
>
> @@ -16,13 +21,13 @@ of describing where they take different paths and where they share code.
> What happens when regular CPU hotplug and Suspend-to-RAM race with each other
> is not depicted here.]
>
> -On a high level, the suspend-resume cycle goes like this:
> +On a high level, the suspend-resume cycle goes like this::
>
> -|Freeze| -> |Disable nonboot| -> |Do suspend| -> |Enable nonboot| -> |Thaw |
> -|tasks | | cpus | | | | cpus | |tasks|
> + |Freeze| -> |Disable nonboot| -> |Do suspend| -> |Enable nonboot| -> |Thaw |
> + |tasks | | cpus | | | | cpus | |tasks|
>
>
> -More details follow:
> +More details follow::
>
> Suspend call path
> -----------------
> @@ -87,7 +92,9 @@ More details follow:
>
> Resuming back is likewise, with the counterparts being (in the order of
> execution during resume):
> -* enable_nonboot_cpus() which involves:
> +
> +* enable_nonboot_cpus() which involves::
> +
> | Acquire cpu_add_remove_lock
> | Decrease cpu_hotplug_disabled, thereby enabling regular cpu hotplug
> | Call _cpu_up() [for all those cpus in the frozen_cpus mask, in a loop]
> @@ -101,7 +108,7 @@ execution during resume):
>
> It is to be noted here that the system_transition_mutex lock is acquired at the very
> beginning, when we are just starting out to suspend, and then released only
> -after the entire cycle is complete (i.e., suspend + resume).
> +after the entire cycle is complete (i.e., suspend + resume)::
>
>
>
> @@ -152,16 +159,16 @@ with the 'tasks_frozen' argument set to 1.
>
>
> Important files and functions/entry points:
> -------------------------------------------
> +-------------------------------------------
>
> -kernel/power/process.c : freeze_processes(), thaw_processes()
> -kernel/power/suspend.c : suspend_prepare(), suspend_enter(), suspend_finish()
> -kernel/cpu.c: cpu_[up|down](), _cpu_[up|down](), [disable|enable]_nonboot_cpus()
> +- kernel/power/process.c : freeze_processes(), thaw_processes()
> +- kernel/power/suspend.c : suspend_prepare(), suspend_enter(), suspend_finish()
> +- kernel/cpu.c: cpu_[up|down](), _cpu_[up|down](), [disable|enable]_nonboot_cpus()
>
>
>
> II. What are the issues involved in CPU hotplug?
> - -------------------------------------------
> +------------------------------------------------
>
> There are some interesting situations involving CPU hotplug and microcode
> update on the CPUs, as discussed below:
> @@ -243,8 +250,11 @@ d. Handling microcode update during suspend/hibernate:
> cycles).
>
>
> -III. Are there any known problems when regular CPU hotplug and suspend race
> - with each other?
> +III. Known problems
> +===================
> +
> +Are there any known problems when regular CPU hotplug and suspend race
> +with each other?
>
> Yes, they are listed below:
>
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/suspend-and-interrupts.txt b/Documentation/power/suspend-and-interrupts.rst
> similarity index 98%
> rename from Documentation/power/suspend-and-interrupts.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/suspend-and-interrupts.rst
> index 8afb29a8604a..4cda6617709a 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/suspend-and-interrupts.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/suspend-and-interrupts.rst
> @@ -1,4 +1,6 @@
> +====================================
> System Suspend and Device Interrupts
> +====================================
>
> Copyright (C) 2014 Intel Corp.
> Author: Rafael J. Wysocki <rafael.j.wysocki@intel.com>
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.txt b/Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.rst
> similarity index 83%
> rename from Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.rst
> index f281886de490..a33a2919dbe4 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.rst
> @@ -1,4 +1,7 @@
> +===============================================
> Using swap files with software suspend (swsusp)
> +===============================================
> +
> (C) 2006 Rafael J. Wysocki <rjw@sisk.pl>
>
> The Linux kernel handles swap files almost in the same way as it handles swap
> @@ -21,20 +24,20 @@ units.
>
> In order to use a swap file with swsusp, you need to:
>
> -1) Create the swap file and make it active, eg.
> +1) Create the swap file and make it active, eg.::
>
> -# dd if=/dev/zero of=<swap_file_path> bs=1024 count=<swap_file_size_in_k>
> -# mkswap <swap_file_path>
> -# swapon <swap_file_path>
> + # dd if=/dev/zero of=<swap_file_path> bs=1024 count=<swap_file_size_in_k>
> + # mkswap <swap_file_path>
> + # swapon <swap_file_path>
>
> 2) Use an application that will bmap the swap file with the help of the
> FIBMAP ioctl and determine the location of the file's swap header, as the
> offset, in <PAGE_SIZE> units, from the beginning of the partition which
> holds the swap file.
>
> -3) Add the following parameters to the kernel command line:
> +3) Add the following parameters to the kernel command line::
>
> -resume=<swap_file_partition> resume_offset=<swap_file_offset>
> + resume=<swap_file_partition> resume_offset=<swap_file_offset>
>
> where <swap_file_partition> is the partition on which the swap file is located
> and <swap_file_offset> is the offset of the swap header determined by the
> @@ -46,7 +49,7 @@ OR
>
> Use a userland suspend application that will set the partition and offset
> with the help of the SNAPSHOT_SET_SWAP_AREA ioctl described in
> -Documentation/power/userland-swsusp.txt (this is the only method to suspend
> +Documentation/power/userland-swsusp.rst (this is the only method to suspend
> to a swap file allowing the resume to be initiated from an initrd or initramfs
> image).
>
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/swsusp-dmcrypt.txt b/Documentation/power/swsusp-dmcrypt.rst
> similarity index 67%
> rename from Documentation/power/swsusp-dmcrypt.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/swsusp-dmcrypt.rst
> index b802fbfd95ef..426df59172cd 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/swsusp-dmcrypt.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/swsusp-dmcrypt.rst
> @@ -1,13 +1,15 @@
> +=======================================
> +How to use dm-crypt and swsusp together
> +=======================================
> +
> Author: Andreas Steinmetz <ast@domdv.de>
>
>
> -How to use dm-crypt and swsusp together:
> -========================================
>
> Some prerequisites:
> You know how dm-crypt works. If not, visit the following web page:
> http://www.saout.de/misc/dm-crypt/
> -You have read Documentation/power/swsusp.txt and understand it.
> +You have read Documentation/power/swsusp.rst and understand it.
> You did read Documentation/admin-guide/initrd.rst and know how an initrd works.
> You know how to create or how to modify an initrd.
>
> @@ -29,23 +31,23 @@ a way that the swap device you suspend to/resume from has
> always the same major/minor within the initrd as well as
> within your running system. The easiest way to achieve this is
> to always set up this swap device first with dmsetup, so that
> -it will always look like the following:
> +it will always look like the following::
>
> -brw------- 1 root root 254, 0 Jul 28 13:37 /dev/mapper/swap0
> + brw------- 1 root root 254, 0 Jul 28 13:37 /dev/mapper/swap0
>
> Now set up your kernel to use /dev/mapper/swap0 as the default
> -resume partition, so your kernel .config contains:
> +resume partition, so your kernel .config contains::
>
> -CONFIG_PM_STD_PARTITION="/dev/mapper/swap0"
> + CONFIG_PM_STD_PARTITION="/dev/mapper/swap0"
>
> Prepare your boot loader to use the initrd you will create or
> modify. For lilo the simplest setup looks like the following
> -lines:
> +lines::
>
> -image=/boot/vmlinuz
> -initrd=/boot/initrd.gz
> -label=linux
> -append="root=/dev/ram0 init=/linuxrc rw"
> + image=/boot/vmlinuz
> + initrd=/boot/initrd.gz
> + label=linux
> + append="root=/dev/ram0 init=/linuxrc rw"
>
> Finally you need to create or modify your initrd. Lets assume
> you create an initrd that reads the required dm-crypt setup
> @@ -53,66 +55,66 @@ from a pcmcia flash disk card. The card is formatted with an ext2
> fs which resides on /dev/hde1 when the card is inserted. The
> card contains at least the encrypted swap setup in a file
> named "swapkey". /etc/fstab of your initrd contains something
> -like the following:
> +like the following::
>
> -/dev/hda1 /mnt ext3 ro 0 0
> -none /proc proc defaults,noatime,nodiratime 0 0
> -none /sys sysfs defaults,noatime,nodiratime 0 0
> + /dev/hda1 /mnt ext3 ro 0 0
> + none /proc proc defaults,noatime,nodiratime 0 0
> + none /sys sysfs defaults,noatime,nodiratime 0 0
>
> /dev/hda1 contains an unencrypted mini system that sets up all
> of your crypto devices, again by reading the setup from the
> pcmcia flash disk. What follows now is a /linuxrc for your
> initrd that allows you to resume from encrypted swap and that
> continues boot with your mini system on /dev/hda1 if resume
> -does not happen:
> +does not happen::
>
> -#!/bin/sh
> -PATH=/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin
> -mount /proc
> -mount /sys
> -mapped=0
> -noresume=`grep -c noresume /proc/cmdline`
> -if [ "$*" != "" ]
> -then
> - noresume=1
> -fi
> -dmesg -n 1
> -/sbin/cardmgr -q
> -for i in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
> -do
> - if [ -f /proc/ide/hde/media ]
> + #!/bin/sh
> + PATH=/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin
> + mount /proc
> + mount /sys
> + mapped=0
> + noresume=`grep -c noresume /proc/cmdline`
> + if [ "$*" != "" ]
> then
> + noresume=1
> + fi
> + dmesg -n 1
> + /sbin/cardmgr -q
> + for i in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
> + do
> + if [ -f /proc/ide/hde/media ]
> + then
> + usleep 500000
> + mount -t ext2 -o ro /dev/hde1 /mnt
> + if [ -f /mnt/swapkey ]
> + then
> + dmsetup create swap0 /mnt/swapkey > /dev/null 2>&1 && mapped=1
> + fi
> + umount /mnt
> + break
> + fi
> usleep 500000
> - mount -t ext2 -o ro /dev/hde1 /mnt
> - if [ -f /mnt/swapkey ]
> + done
> + killproc /sbin/cardmgr
> + dmesg -n 6
> + if [ $mapped = 1 ]
> + then
> + if [ $noresume != 0 ]
> then
> - dmsetup create swap0 /mnt/swapkey > /dev/null 2>&1 && mapped=1
> + mkswap /dev/mapper/swap0 > /dev/null 2>&1
> fi
> - umount /mnt
> - break
> + echo 254:0 > /sys/power/resume
> + dmsetup remove swap0
> fi
> - usleep 500000
> -done
> -killproc /sbin/cardmgr
> -dmesg -n 6
> -if [ $mapped = 1 ]
> -then
> - if [ $noresume != 0 ]
> - then
> - mkswap /dev/mapper/swap0 > /dev/null 2>&1
> - fi
> - echo 254:0 > /sys/power/resume
> - dmsetup remove swap0
> -fi
> -umount /sys
> -mount /mnt
> -umount /proc
> -cd /mnt
> -pivot_root . mnt
> -mount /proc
> -umount -l /mnt
> -umount /proc
> -exec chroot . /sbin/init $* < dev/console > dev/console 2>&1
> + umount /sys
> + mount /mnt
> + umount /proc
> + cd /mnt
> + pivot_root . mnt
> + mount /proc
> + umount -l /mnt
> + umount /proc
> + exec chroot . /sbin/init $* < dev/console > dev/console 2>&1
>
> Please don't mind the weird loop above, busybox's msh doesn't know
> the let statement. Now, what is happening in the script?
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/swsusp.rst b/Documentation/power/swsusp.rst
> new file mode 100644
> index 000000000000..d000312f6965
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/Documentation/power/swsusp.rst
> @@ -0,0 +1,501 @@
> +============
> +Swap suspend
> +============
> +
> +Some warnings, first.
> +
> +.. warning::
> +
> + **BIG FAT WARNING**
> +
> + If you touch anything on disk between suspend and resume...
> + ...kiss your data goodbye.
> +
> + If you do resume from initrd after your filesystems are mounted...
> + ...bye bye root partition.
> +
> + [this is actually same case as above]
> +
> + If you have unsupported ( ) devices using DMA, you may have some
> + problems. If your disk driver does not support suspend... (IDE does),
> + it may cause some problems, too. If you change kernel command line
> + between suspend and resume, it may do something wrong. If you change
> + your hardware while system is suspended... well, it was not good idea;
> + but it will probably only crash.
> +
> + ( ) suspend/resume support is needed to make it safe.
> +
> + If you have any filesystems on USB devices mounted before software suspend,
> + they won't be accessible after resume and you may lose data, as though
> + you have unplugged the USB devices with mounted filesystems on them;
> + see the FAQ below for details. (This is not true for more traditional
> + power states like "standby", which normally don't turn USB off.)
> +
> +Swap partition:
> + You need to append resume=/dev/your_swap_partition to kernel command
> + line or specify it using /sys/power/resume.
> +
> +Swap file:
> + If using a swapfile you can also specify a resume offset using
> + resume_offset=<number> on the kernel command line or specify it
> + in /sys/power/resume_offset.
> +
> +After preparing then you suspend by::
> +
> + echo shutdown > /sys/power/disk; echo disk > /sys/power/state
> +
> +- If you feel ACPI works pretty well on your system, you might try::
> +
> + echo platform > /sys/power/disk; echo disk > /sys/power/state
> +
> +- If you would like to write hibernation image to swap and then suspend
> + to RAM (provided your platform supports it), you can try::
> +
> + echo suspend > /sys/power/disk; echo disk > /sys/power/state
> +
> +- If you have SATA disks, you'll need recent kernels with SATA suspend
> + support. For suspend and resume to work, make sure your disk drivers
> + are built into kernel -- not modules. [There's way to make
> + suspend/resume with modular disk drivers, see FAQ, but you probably
> + should not do that.]
> +
> +If you want to limit the suspend image size to N bytes, do::
> +
> + echo N > /sys/power/image_size
> +
> +before suspend (it is limited to around 2/5 of available RAM by default).
> +
> +- The resume process checks for the presence of the resume device,
> + if found, it then checks the contents for the hibernation image signature.
> + If both are found, it resumes the hibernation image.
> +
> +- The resume process may be triggered in two ways:
> +
> + 1) During lateinit: If resume=/dev/your_swap_partition is specified on
> + the kernel command line, lateinit runs the resume process. If the
> + resume device has not been probed yet, the resume process fails and
> + bootup continues.
> + 2) Manually from an initrd or initramfs: May be run from
> + the init script by using the /sys/power/resume file. It is vital
> + that this be done prior to remounting any filesystems (even as
> + read-only) otherwise data may be corrupted.
> +
> +Article about goals and implementation of Software Suspend for Linux
> +====================================================================
> +
> +Author: Gábor Kuti
> +Last revised: 2003-10-20 by Pavel Machek
> +
> +Idea and goals to achieve
> +-------------------------
> +
> +Nowadays it is common in several laptops that they have a suspend button. It
> +saves the state of the machine to a filesystem or to a partition and switches
> +to standby mode. Later resuming the machine the saved state is loaded back to
> +ram and the machine can continue its work. It has two real benefits. First we
> +save ourselves the time machine goes down and later boots up, energy costs
> +are real high when running from batteries. The other gain is that we don't have
> +to interrupt our programs so processes that are calculating something for a long
> +time shouldn't need to be written interruptible.
> +
> +swsusp saves the state of the machine into active swaps and then reboots or
> +powerdowns. You must explicitly specify the swap partition to resume from with
> +`resume=` kernel option. If signature is found it loads and restores saved
> +state. If the option `noresume` is specified as a boot parameter, it skips
> +the resuming. If the option `hibernate=nocompress` is specified as a boot
> +parameter, it saves hibernation image without compression.
> +
> +In the meantime while the system is suspended you should not add/remove any
> +of the hardware, write to the filesystems, etc.
> +
> +Sleep states summary
> +====================
> +
> +There are three different interfaces you can use, /proc/acpi should
> +work like this:
> +
> +In a really perfect world::
> +
> + echo 1 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for standby
> + echo 2 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for suspend to ram
> + echo 3 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for suspend to ram, but with more power conservative
> + echo 4 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for suspend to disk
> + echo 5 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for shutdown unfriendly the system
> +
> +and perhaps::
> +
> + echo 4b > /proc/acpi/sleep # for suspend to disk via s4bios
> +
> +Frequently Asked Questions
> +==========================
> +
> +Q:
> + well, suspending a server is IMHO a really stupid thing,
> + but... (Diego Zuccato):
> +
> +A:
> + You bought new UPS for your server. How do you install it without
> + bringing machine down? Suspend to disk, rearrange power cables,
> + resume.
> +
> + You have your server on UPS. Power died, and UPS is indicating 30
> + seconds to failure. What do you do? Suspend to disk.
> +
> +
> +Q:
> + Maybe I'm missing something, but why don't the regular I/O paths work?
> +
> +A:
> + We do use the regular I/O paths. However we cannot restore the data
> + to its original location as we load it. That would create an
> + inconsistent kernel state which would certainly result in an oops.
> + Instead, we load the image into unused memory and then atomically copy
> + it back to it original location. This implies, of course, a maximum
> + image size of half the amount of memory.
> +
> + There are two solutions to this:
> +
> + * require half of memory to be free during suspend. That way you can
> + read "new" data onto free spots, then cli and copy
> +
> + * assume we had special "polling" ide driver that only uses memory
> + between 0-640KB. That way, I'd have to make sure that 0-640KB is free
> + during suspending, but otherwise it would work...
> +
> + suspend2 shares this fundamental limitation, but does not include user
> + data and disk caches into "used memory" by saving them in
> + advance. That means that the limitation goes away in practice.
> +
> +Q:
> + Does linux support ACPI S4?
> +
> +A:
> + Yes. That's what echo platform > /sys/power/disk does.
> +
> +Q:
> + What is 'suspend2'?
> +
> +A:
> + suspend2 is 'Software Suspend 2', a forked implementation of
> + suspend-to-disk which is available as separate patches for 2.4 and 2.6
> + kernels from swsusp.sourceforge.net. It includes support for SMP, 4GB
> + highmem and preemption. It also has a extensible architecture that
> + allows for arbitrary transformations on the image (compression,
> + encryption) and arbitrary backends for writing the image (eg to swap
> + or an NFS share[Work In Progress]). Questions regarding suspend2
> + should be sent to the mailing list available through the suspend2
> + website, and not to the Linux Kernel Mailing List. We are working
> + toward merging suspend2 into the mainline kernel.
> +
> +Q:
> + What is the freezing of tasks and why are we using it?
> +
> +A:
> + The freezing of tasks is a mechanism by which user space processes and some
> + kernel threads are controlled during hibernation or system-wide suspend (on some
> + architectures). See freezing-of-tasks.txt for details.
> +
> +Q:
> + What is the difference between "platform" and "shutdown"?
> +
> +A:
> + shutdown:
> + save state in linux, then tell bios to powerdown
> +
> + platform:
> + save state in linux, then tell bios to powerdown and blink
> + "suspended led"
> +
> + "platform" is actually right thing to do where supported, but
> + "shutdown" is most reliable (except on ACPI systems).
> +
> +Q:
> + I do not understand why you have such strong objections to idea of
> + selective suspend.
> +
> +A:
> + Do selective suspend during runtime power management, that's okay. But
> + it's useless for suspend-to-disk. (And I do not see how you could use
> + it for suspend-to-ram, I hope you do not want that).
> +
> + Lets see, so you suggest to
> +
> + * SUSPEND all but swap device and parents
> + * Snapshot
> + * Write image to disk
> + * SUSPEND swap device and parents
> + * Powerdown
> +
> + Oh no, that does not work, if swap device or its parents uses DMA,
> + you've corrupted data. You'd have to do
> +
> + * SUSPEND all but swap device and parents
> + * FREEZE swap device and parents
> + * Snapshot
> + * UNFREEZE swap device and parents
> + * Write
> + * SUSPEND swap device and parents
> +
> + Which means that you still need that FREEZE state, and you get more
> + complicated code. (And I have not yet introduce details like system
> + devices).
> +
> +Q:
> + There don't seem to be any generally useful behavioral
> + distinctions between SUSPEND and FREEZE.
> +
> +A:
> + Doing SUSPEND when you are asked to do FREEZE is always correct,
> + but it may be unnecessarily slow. If you want your driver to stay simple,
> + slowness may not matter to you. It can always be fixed later.
> +
> + For devices like disk it does matter, you do not want to spindown for
> + FREEZE.
> +
> +Q:
> + After resuming, system is paging heavily, leading to very bad interactivity.
> +
> +A:
> + Try running::
> +
> + cat /proc/[0-9]*/maps | grep / | sed 's:.* /:/:' | sort -u | while read file
> + do
> + test -f "$file" && cat "$file" > /dev/null
> + done
> +
> + after resume. swapoff -a; swapon -a may also be useful.
> +
> +Q:
> + What happens to devices during swsusp? They seem to be resumed
> + during system suspend?
> +
> +A:
> + That's correct. We need to resume them if we want to write image to
> + disk. Whole sequence goes like
> +
> + **Suspend part**
> +
> + running system, user asks for suspend-to-disk
> +
> + user processes are stopped
> +
> + suspend(PMSG_FREEZE): devices are frozen so that they don't interfere
> + with state snapshot
> +
> + state snapshot: copy of whole used memory is taken with interrupts disabled
> +
> + resume(): devices are woken up so that we can write image to swap
> +
> + write image to swap
> +
> + suspend(PMSG_SUSPEND): suspend devices so that we can power off
> +
> + turn the power off
> +
> + **Resume part**
> +
> + (is actually pretty similar)
> +
> + running system, user asks for suspend-to-disk
> +
> + user processes are stopped (in common case there are none,
> + but with resume-from-initrd, no one knows)
> +
> + read image from disk
> +
> + suspend(PMSG_FREEZE): devices are frozen so that they don't interfere
> + with image restoration
> +
> + image restoration: rewrite memory with image
> +
> + resume(): devices are woken up so that system can continue
> +
> + thaw all user processes
> +
> +Q:
> + What is this 'Encrypt suspend image' for?
> +
> +A:
> + First of all: it is not a replacement for dm-crypt encrypted swap.
> + It cannot protect your computer while it is suspended. Instead it does
> + protect from leaking sensitive data after resume from suspend.
> +
> + Think of the following: you suspend while an application is running
> + that keeps sensitive data in memory. The application itself prevents
> + the data from being swapped out. Suspend, however, must write these
> + data to swap to be able to resume later on. Without suspend encryption
> + your sensitive data are then stored in plaintext on disk. This means
> + that after resume your sensitive data are accessible to all
> + applications having direct access to the swap device which was used
> + for suspend. If you don't need swap after resume these data can remain
> + on disk virtually forever. Thus it can happen that your system gets
> + broken in weeks later and sensitive data which you thought were
> + encrypted and protected are retrieved and stolen from the swap device.
> + To prevent this situation you should use 'Encrypt suspend image'.
> +
> + During suspend a temporary key is created and this key is used to
> + encrypt the data written to disk. When, during resume, the data was
> + read back into memory the temporary key is destroyed which simply
> + means that all data written to disk during suspend are then
> + inaccessible so they can't be stolen later on. The only thing that
> + you must then take care of is that you call 'mkswap' for the swap
> + partition used for suspend as early as possible during regular
> + boot. This asserts that any temporary key from an oopsed suspend or
> + from a failed or aborted resume is erased from the swap device.
> +
> + As a rule of thumb use encrypted swap to protect your data while your
> + system is shut down or suspended. Additionally use the encrypted
> + suspend image to prevent sensitive data from being stolen after
> + resume.
> +
> +Q:
> + Can I suspend to a swap file?
> +
> +A:
> + Generally, yes, you can. However, it requires you to use the "resume=" and
> + "resume_offset=" kernel command line parameters, so the resume from a swap file
> + cannot be initiated from an initrd or initramfs image. See
> + swsusp-and-swap-files.txt for details.
> +
> +Q:
> + Is there a maximum system RAM size that is supported by swsusp?
> +
> +A:
> + It should work okay with highmem.
> +
> +Q:
> + Does swsusp (to disk) use only one swap partition or can it use
> + multiple swap partitions (aggregate them into one logical space)?
> +
> +A:
> + Only one swap partition, sorry.
> +
> +Q:
> + If my application(s) causes lots of memory & swap space to be used
> + (over half of the total system RAM), is it correct that it is likely
> + to be useless to try to suspend to disk while that app is running?
> +
> +A:
> + No, it should work okay, as long as your app does not mlock()
> + it. Just prepare big enough swap partition.
> +
> +Q:
> + What information is useful for debugging suspend-to-disk problems?
> +
> +A:
> + Well, last messages on the screen are always useful. If something
> + is broken, it is usually some kernel driver, therefore trying with as
> + little as possible modules loaded helps a lot. I also prefer people to
> + suspend from console, preferably without X running. Booting with
> + init=/bin/bash, then swapon and starting suspend sequence manually
> + usually does the trick. Then it is good idea to try with latest
> + vanilla kernel.
> +
> +Q:
> + How can distributions ship a swsusp-supporting kernel with modular
> + disk drivers (especially SATA)?
> +
> +A:
> + Well, it can be done, load the drivers, then do echo into
> + /sys/power/resume file from initrd. Be sure not to mount
> + anything, not even read-only mount, or you are going to lose your
> + data.
> +
> +Q:
> + How do I make suspend more verbose?
> +
> +A:
> + If you want to see any non-error kernel messages on the virtual
> + terminal the kernel switches to during suspend, you have to set the
> + kernel console loglevel to at least 4 (KERN_WARNING), for example by
> + doing::
> +
> + # save the old loglevel
> + read LOGLEVEL DUMMY < /proc/sys/kernel/printk
> + # set the loglevel so we see the progress bar.
> + # if the level is higher than needed, we leave it alone.
> + if [ $LOGLEVEL -lt 5 ]; then
> + echo 5 > /proc/sys/kernel/printk
> + fi
> +
> + IMG_SZ=0
> + read IMG_SZ < /sys/power/image_size
> + echo -n disk > /sys/power/state
> + RET=$?
> + #
> + # the logic here is:
> + # if image_size > 0 (without kernel support, IMG_SZ will be zero),
> + # then try again with image_size set to zero.
> + if [ $RET -ne 0 -a $IMG_SZ -ne 0 ]; then # try again with minimal image size
> + echo 0 > /sys/power/image_size
> + echo -n disk > /sys/power/state
> + RET=$?
> + fi
> +
> + # restore previous loglevel
> + echo $LOGLEVEL > /proc/sys/kernel/printk
> + exit $RET
> +
> +Q:
> + Is this true that if I have a mounted filesystem on a USB device and
> + I suspend to disk, I can lose data unless the filesystem has been mounted
> + with "sync"?
> +
> +A:
> + That's right ... if you disconnect that device, you may lose data.
> + In fact, even with "-o sync" you can lose data if your programs have
> + information in buffers they haven't written out to a disk you disconnect,
> + or if you disconnect before the device finished saving data you wrote.
> +
> + Software suspend normally powers down USB controllers, which is equivalent
> + to disconnecting all USB devices attached to your system.
> +
> + Your system might well support low-power modes for its USB controllers
> + while the system is asleep, maintaining the connection, using true sleep
> + modes like "suspend-to-RAM" or "standby". (Don't write "disk" to the
> + /sys/power/state file; write "standby" or "mem".) We've not seen any
> + hardware that can use these modes through software suspend, although in
> + theory some systems might support "platform" modes that won't break the
> + USB connections.
> +
> + Remember that it's always a bad idea to unplug a disk drive containing a
> + mounted filesystem. That's true even when your system is asleep! The
> + safest thing is to unmount all filesystems on removable media (such USB,
> + Firewire, CompactFlash, MMC, external SATA, or even IDE hotplug bays)
> + before suspending; then remount them after resuming.
> +
> + There is a work-around for this problem. For more information, see
> + Documentation/driver-api/usb/persist.rst.
> +
> +Q:
> + Can I suspend-to-disk using a swap partition under LVM?
> +
> +A:
> + Yes and No. You can suspend successfully, but the kernel will not be able
> + to resume on its own. You need an initramfs that can recognize the resume
> + situation, activate the logical volume containing the swap volume (but not
> + touch any filesystems!), and eventually call::
> +
> + echo -n "$major:$minor" > /sys/power/resume
> +
> + where $major and $minor are the respective major and minor device numbers of
> + the swap volume.
> +
> + uswsusp works with LVM, too. See http://suspend.sourceforge.net/
> +
> +Q:
> + I upgraded the kernel from 2.6.15 to 2.6.16. Both kernels were
> + compiled with the similar configuration files. Anyway I found that
> + suspend to disk (and resume) is much slower on 2.6.16 compared to
> + 2.6.15. Any idea for why that might happen or how can I speed it up?
> +
> +A:
> + This is because the size of the suspend image is now greater than
> + for 2.6.15 (by saving more data we can get more responsive system
> + after resume).
> +
> + There's the /sys/power/image_size knob that controls the size of the
> + image. If you set it to 0 (eg. by echo 0 > /sys/power/image_size as
> + root), the 2.6.15 behavior should be restored. If it is still too
> + slow, take a look at suspend.sf.net -- userland suspend is faster and
> + supports LZF compression to speed it up further.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/swsusp.txt b/Documentation/power/swsusp.txt
> deleted file mode 100644
> index 236d1fb13640..000000000000
> --- a/Documentation/power/swsusp.txt
> +++ /dev/null
> @@ -1,446 +0,0 @@
> -Some warnings, first.
> -
> - * BIG FAT WARNING *********************************************************
> - *
> - * If you touch anything on disk between suspend and resume...
> - * ...kiss your data goodbye.
> - *
> - * If you do resume from initrd after your filesystems are mounted...
> - * ...bye bye root partition.
> - * [this is actually same case as above]
> - *
> - * If you have unsupported (*) devices using DMA, you may have some
> - * problems. If your disk driver does not support suspend... (IDE does),
> - * it may cause some problems, too. If you change kernel command line
> - * between suspend and resume, it may do something wrong. If you change
> - * your hardware while system is suspended... well, it was not good idea;
> - * but it will probably only crash.
> - *
> - * (*) suspend/resume support is needed to make it safe.
> - *
> - * If you have any filesystems on USB devices mounted before software suspend,
> - * they won't be accessible after resume and you may lose data, as though
> - * you have unplugged the USB devices with mounted filesystems on them;
> - * see the FAQ below for details. (This is not true for more traditional
> - * power states like "standby", which normally don't turn USB off.)
> -
> -Swap partition:
> -You need to append resume=/dev/your_swap_partition to kernel command
> -line or specify it using /sys/power/resume.
> -
> -Swap file:
> -If using a swapfile you can also specify a resume offset using
> -resume_offset=<number> on the kernel command line or specify it
> -in /sys/power/resume_offset.
> -
> -After preparing then you suspend by
> -
> -echo shutdown > /sys/power/disk; echo disk > /sys/power/state
> -
> -. If you feel ACPI works pretty well on your system, you might try
> -
> -echo platform > /sys/power/disk; echo disk > /sys/power/state
> -
> -. If you would like to write hibernation image to swap and then suspend
> -to RAM (provided your platform supports it), you can try
> -
> -echo suspend > /sys/power/disk; echo disk > /sys/power/state
> -
> -. If you have SATA disks, you'll need recent kernels with SATA suspend
> -support. For suspend and resume to work, make sure your disk drivers
> -are built into kernel -- not modules. [There's way to make
> -suspend/resume with modular disk drivers, see FAQ, but you probably
> -should not do that.]
> -
> -If you want to limit the suspend image size to N bytes, do
> -
> -echo N > /sys/power/image_size
> -
> -before suspend (it is limited to around 2/5 of available RAM by default).
> -
> -. The resume process checks for the presence of the resume device,
> -if found, it then checks the contents for the hibernation image signature.
> -If both are found, it resumes the hibernation image.
> -
> -. The resume process may be triggered in two ways:
> - 1) During lateinit: If resume=/dev/your_swap_partition is specified on
> - the kernel command line, lateinit runs the resume process. If the
> - resume device has not been probed yet, the resume process fails and
> - bootup continues.
> - 2) Manually from an initrd or initramfs: May be run from
> - the init script by using the /sys/power/resume file. It is vital
> - that this be done prior to remounting any filesystems (even as
> - read-only) otherwise data may be corrupted.
> -
> -Article about goals and implementation of Software Suspend for Linux
> -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> -Author: Gábor Kuti
> -Last revised: 2003-10-20 by Pavel Machek
> -
> -Idea and goals to achieve
> -
> -Nowadays it is common in several laptops that they have a suspend button. It
> -saves the state of the machine to a filesystem or to a partition and switches
> -to standby mode. Later resuming the machine the saved state is loaded back to
> -ram and the machine can continue its work. It has two real benefits. First we
> -save ourselves the time machine goes down and later boots up, energy costs
> -are real high when running from batteries. The other gain is that we don't have to
> -interrupt our programs so processes that are calculating something for a long
> -time shouldn't need to be written interruptible.
> -
> -swsusp saves the state of the machine into active swaps and then reboots or
> -powerdowns. You must explicitly specify the swap partition to resume from with
> -``resume='' kernel option. If signature is found it loads and restores saved
> -state. If the option ``noresume'' is specified as a boot parameter, it skips
> -the resuming. If the option ``hibernate=nocompress'' is specified as a boot
> -parameter, it saves hibernation image without compression.
> -
> -In the meantime while the system is suspended you should not add/remove any
> -of the hardware, write to the filesystems, etc.
> -
> -Sleep states summary
> -====================
> -
> -There are three different interfaces you can use, /proc/acpi should
> -work like this:
> -
> -In a really perfect world:
> -echo 1 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for standby
> -echo 2 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for suspend to ram
> -echo 3 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for suspend to ram, but with more power conservative
> -echo 4 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for suspend to disk
> -echo 5 > /proc/acpi/sleep # for shutdown unfriendly the system
> -
> -and perhaps
> -echo 4b > /proc/acpi/sleep # for suspend to disk via s4bios
> -
> -Frequently Asked Questions
> -==========================
> -
> -Q: well, suspending a server is IMHO a really stupid thing,
> -but... (Diego Zuccato):
> -
> -A: You bought new UPS for your server. How do you install it without
> -bringing machine down? Suspend to disk, rearrange power cables,
> -resume.
> -
> -You have your server on UPS. Power died, and UPS is indicating 30
> -seconds to failure. What do you do? Suspend to disk.
> -
> -
> -Q: Maybe I'm missing something, but why don't the regular I/O paths work?
> -
> -A: We do use the regular I/O paths. However we cannot restore the data
> -to its original location as we load it. That would create an
> -inconsistent kernel state which would certainly result in an oops.
> -Instead, we load the image into unused memory and then atomically copy
> -it back to it original location. This implies, of course, a maximum
> -image size of half the amount of memory.
> -
> -There are two solutions to this:
> -
> -* require half of memory to be free during suspend. That way you can
> -read "new" data onto free spots, then cli and copy
> -
> -* assume we had special "polling" ide driver that only uses memory
> -between 0-640KB. That way, I'd have to make sure that 0-640KB is free
> -during suspending, but otherwise it would work...
> -
> -suspend2 shares this fundamental limitation, but does not include user
> -data and disk caches into "used memory" by saving them in
> -advance. That means that the limitation goes away in practice.
> -
> -Q: Does linux support ACPI S4?
> -
> -A: Yes. That's what echo platform > /sys/power/disk does.
> -
> -Q: What is 'suspend2'?
> -
> -A: suspend2 is 'Software Suspend 2', a forked implementation of
> -suspend-to-disk which is available as separate patches for 2.4 and 2.6
> -kernels from swsusp.sourceforge.net. It includes support for SMP, 4GB
> -highmem and preemption. It also has a extensible architecture that
> -allows for arbitrary transformations on the image (compression,
> -encryption) and arbitrary backends for writing the image (eg to swap
> -or an NFS share[Work In Progress]). Questions regarding suspend2
> -should be sent to the mailing list available through the suspend2
> -website, and not to the Linux Kernel Mailing List. We are working
> -toward merging suspend2 into the mainline kernel.
> -
> -Q: What is the freezing of tasks and why are we using it?
> -
> -A: The freezing of tasks is a mechanism by which user space processes and some
> -kernel threads are controlled during hibernation or system-wide suspend (on some
> -architectures). See freezing-of-tasks.txt for details.
> -
> -Q: What is the difference between "platform" and "shutdown"?
> -
> -A:
> -
> -shutdown: save state in linux, then tell bios to powerdown
> -
> -platform: save state in linux, then tell bios to powerdown and blink
> - "suspended led"
> -
> -"platform" is actually right thing to do where supported, but
> -"shutdown" is most reliable (except on ACPI systems).
> -
> -Q: I do not understand why you have such strong objections to idea of
> -selective suspend.
> -
> -A: Do selective suspend during runtime power management, that's okay. But
> -it's useless for suspend-to-disk. (And I do not see how you could use
> -it for suspend-to-ram, I hope you do not want that).
> -
> -Lets see, so you suggest to
> -
> -* SUSPEND all but swap device and parents
> -* Snapshot
> -* Write image to disk
> -* SUSPEND swap device and parents
> -* Powerdown
> -
> -Oh no, that does not work, if swap device or its parents uses DMA,
> -you've corrupted data. You'd have to do
> -
> -* SUSPEND all but swap device and parents
> -* FREEZE swap device and parents
> -* Snapshot
> -* UNFREEZE swap device and parents
> -* Write
> -* SUSPEND swap device and parents
> -
> -Which means that you still need that FREEZE state, and you get more
> -complicated code. (And I have not yet introduce details like system
> -devices).
> -
> -Q: There don't seem to be any generally useful behavioral
> -distinctions between SUSPEND and FREEZE.
> -
> -A: Doing SUSPEND when you are asked to do FREEZE is always correct,
> -but it may be unnecessarily slow. If you want your driver to stay simple,
> -slowness may not matter to you. It can always be fixed later.
> -
> -For devices like disk it does matter, you do not want to spindown for
> -FREEZE.
> -
> -Q: After resuming, system is paging heavily, leading to very bad interactivity.
> -
> -A: Try running
> -
> -cat /proc/[0-9]*/maps | grep / | sed 's:.* /:/:' | sort -u | while read file
> -do
> - test -f "$file" && cat "$file" > /dev/null
> -done
> -
> -after resume. swapoff -a; swapon -a may also be useful.
> -
> -Q: What happens to devices during swsusp? They seem to be resumed
> -during system suspend?
> -
> -A: That's correct. We need to resume them if we want to write image to
> -disk. Whole sequence goes like
> -
> - Suspend part
> - ~~~~~~~~~~~~
> - running system, user asks for suspend-to-disk
> -
> - user processes are stopped
> -
> - suspend(PMSG_FREEZE): devices are frozen so that they don't interfere
> - with state snapshot
> -
> - state snapshot: copy of whole used memory is taken with interrupts disabled
> -
> - resume(): devices are woken up so that we can write image to swap
> -
> - write image to swap
> -
> - suspend(PMSG_SUSPEND): suspend devices so that we can power off
> -
> - turn the power off
> -
> - Resume part
> - ~~~~~~~~~~~
> - (is actually pretty similar)
> -
> - running system, user asks for suspend-to-disk
> -
> - user processes are stopped (in common case there are none, but with resume-from-initrd, no one knows)
> -
> - read image from disk
> -
> - suspend(PMSG_FREEZE): devices are frozen so that they don't interfere
> - with image restoration
> -
> - image restoration: rewrite memory with image
> -
> - resume(): devices are woken up so that system can continue
> -
> - thaw all user processes
> -
> -Q: What is this 'Encrypt suspend image' for?
> -
> -A: First of all: it is not a replacement for dm-crypt encrypted swap.
> -It cannot protect your computer while it is suspended. Instead it does
> -protect from leaking sensitive data after resume from suspend.
> -
> -Think of the following: you suspend while an application is running
> -that keeps sensitive data in memory. The application itself prevents
> -the data from being swapped out. Suspend, however, must write these
> -data to swap to be able to resume later on. Without suspend encryption
> -your sensitive data are then stored in plaintext on disk. This means
> -that after resume your sensitive data are accessible to all
> -applications having direct access to the swap device which was used
> -for suspend. If you don't need swap after resume these data can remain
> -on disk virtually forever. Thus it can happen that your system gets
> -broken in weeks later and sensitive data which you thought were
> -encrypted and protected are retrieved and stolen from the swap device.
> -To prevent this situation you should use 'Encrypt suspend image'.
> -
> -During suspend a temporary key is created and this key is used to
> -encrypt the data written to disk. When, during resume, the data was
> -read back into memory the temporary key is destroyed which simply
> -means that all data written to disk during suspend are then
> -inaccessible so they can't be stolen later on. The only thing that
> -you must then take care of is that you call 'mkswap' for the swap
> -partition used for suspend as early as possible during regular
> -boot. This asserts that any temporary key from an oopsed suspend or
> -from a failed or aborted resume is erased from the swap device.
> -
> -As a rule of thumb use encrypted swap to protect your data while your
> -system is shut down or suspended. Additionally use the encrypted
> -suspend image to prevent sensitive data from being stolen after
> -resume.
> -
> -Q: Can I suspend to a swap file?
> -
> -A: Generally, yes, you can. However, it requires you to use the "resume=" and
> -"resume_offset=" kernel command line parameters, so the resume from a swap file
> -cannot be initiated from an initrd or initramfs image. See
> -swsusp-and-swap-files.txt for details.
> -
> -Q: Is there a maximum system RAM size that is supported by swsusp?
> -
> -A: It should work okay with highmem.
> -
> -Q: Does swsusp (to disk) use only one swap partition or can it use
> -multiple swap partitions (aggregate them into one logical space)?
> -
> -A: Only one swap partition, sorry.
> -
> -Q: If my application(s) causes lots of memory & swap space to be used
> -(over half of the total system RAM), is it correct that it is likely
> -to be useless to try to suspend to disk while that app is running?
> -
> -A: No, it should work okay, as long as your app does not mlock()
> -it. Just prepare big enough swap partition.
> -
> -Q: What information is useful for debugging suspend-to-disk problems?
> -
> -A: Well, last messages on the screen are always useful. If something
> -is broken, it is usually some kernel driver, therefore trying with as
> -little as possible modules loaded helps a lot. I also prefer people to
> -suspend from console, preferably without X running. Booting with
> -init=/bin/bash, then swapon and starting suspend sequence manually
> -usually does the trick. Then it is good idea to try with latest
> -vanilla kernel.
> -
> -Q: How can distributions ship a swsusp-supporting kernel with modular
> -disk drivers (especially SATA)?
> -
> -A: Well, it can be done, load the drivers, then do echo into
> -/sys/power/resume file from initrd. Be sure not to mount
> -anything, not even read-only mount, or you are going to lose your
> -data.
> -
> -Q: How do I make suspend more verbose?
> -
> -A: If you want to see any non-error kernel messages on the virtual
> -terminal the kernel switches to during suspend, you have to set the
> -kernel console loglevel to at least 4 (KERN_WARNING), for example by
> -doing
> -
> - # save the old loglevel
> - read LOGLEVEL DUMMY < /proc/sys/kernel/printk
> - # set the loglevel so we see the progress bar.
> - # if the level is higher than needed, we leave it alone.
> - if [ $LOGLEVEL -lt 5 ]; then
> - echo 5 > /proc/sys/kernel/printk
> - fi
> -
> - IMG_SZ=0
> - read IMG_SZ < /sys/power/image_size
> - echo -n disk > /sys/power/state
> - RET=$?
> - #
> - # the logic here is:
> - # if image_size > 0 (without kernel support, IMG_SZ will be zero),
> - # then try again with image_size set to zero.
> - if [ $RET -ne 0 -a $IMG_SZ -ne 0 ]; then # try again with minimal image size
> - echo 0 > /sys/power/image_size
> - echo -n disk > /sys/power/state
> - RET=$?
> - fi
> -
> - # restore previous loglevel
> - echo $LOGLEVEL > /proc/sys/kernel/printk
> - exit $RET
> -
> -Q: Is this true that if I have a mounted filesystem on a USB device and
> -I suspend to disk, I can lose data unless the filesystem has been mounted
> -with "sync"?
> -
> -A: That's right ... if you disconnect that device, you may lose data.
> -In fact, even with "-o sync" you can lose data if your programs have
> -information in buffers they haven't written out to a disk you disconnect,
> -or if you disconnect before the device finished saving data you wrote.
> -
> -Software suspend normally powers down USB controllers, which is equivalent
> -to disconnecting all USB devices attached to your system.
> -
> -Your system might well support low-power modes for its USB controllers
> -while the system is asleep, maintaining the connection, using true sleep
> -modes like "suspend-to-RAM" or "standby". (Don't write "disk" to the
> -/sys/power/state file; write "standby" or "mem".) We've not seen any
> -hardware that can use these modes through software suspend, although in
> -theory some systems might support "platform" modes that won't break the
> -USB connections.
> -
> -Remember that it's always a bad idea to unplug a disk drive containing a
> -mounted filesystem. That's true even when your system is asleep! The
> -safest thing is to unmount all filesystems on removable media (such USB,
> -Firewire, CompactFlash, MMC, external SATA, or even IDE hotplug bays)
> -before suspending; then remount them after resuming.
> -
> -There is a work-around for this problem. For more information, see
> -Documentation/driver-api/usb/persist.rst.
> -
> -Q: Can I suspend-to-disk using a swap partition under LVM?
> -
> -A: Yes and No. You can suspend successfully, but the kernel will not be able
> -to resume on its own. You need an initramfs that can recognize the resume
> -situation, activate the logical volume containing the swap volume (but not
> -touch any filesystems!), and eventually call
> -
> -echo -n "$major:$minor" > /sys/power/resume
> -
> -where $major and $minor are the respective major and minor device numbers of
> -the swap volume.
> -
> -uswsusp works with LVM, too. See http://suspend.sourceforge.net/
> -
> -Q: I upgraded the kernel from 2.6.15 to 2.6.16. Both kernels were
> -compiled with the similar configuration files. Anyway I found that
> -suspend to disk (and resume) is much slower on 2.6.16 compared to
> -2.6.15. Any idea for why that might happen or how can I speed it up?
> -
> -A: This is because the size of the suspend image is now greater than
> -for 2.6.15 (by saving more data we can get more responsive system
> -after resume).
> -
> -There's the /sys/power/image_size knob that controls the size of the
> -image. If you set it to 0 (eg. by echo 0 > /sys/power/image_size as
> -root), the 2.6.15 behavior should be restored. If it is still too
> -slow, take a look at suspend.sf.net -- userland suspend is faster and
> -supports LZF compression to speed it up further.
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/tricks.txt b/Documentation/power/tricks.rst
> similarity index 93%
> rename from Documentation/power/tricks.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/tricks.rst
> index a1b8f7249f4c..ca787f142c3f 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/tricks.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/tricks.rst
> @@ -1,5 +1,7 @@
> - swsusp/S3 tricks
> - ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> +================
> +swsusp/S3 tricks
> +================
> +
> Pavel Machek <pavel@ucw.cz>
>
> If you want to trick swsusp/S3 into working, you might want to try:
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/userland-swsusp.txt b/Documentation/power/userland-swsusp.rst
> similarity index 85%
> rename from Documentation/power/userland-swsusp.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/userland-swsusp.rst
> index bbfcd1bbedc5..a0fa51bb1a4d 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/userland-swsusp.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/userland-swsusp.rst
> @@ -1,4 +1,7 @@
> +=====================================================
> Documentation for userland software suspend interface
> +=====================================================
> +
> (C) 2006 Rafael J. Wysocki <rjw@sisk.pl>
>
> First, the warnings at the beginning of swsusp.txt still apply.
> @@ -30,13 +33,16 @@ called.
>
> The ioctl() commands recognized by the device are:
>
> -SNAPSHOT_FREEZE - freeze user space processes (the current process is
> +SNAPSHOT_FREEZE
> + freeze user space processes (the current process is
> not frozen); this is required for SNAPSHOT_CREATE_IMAGE
> and SNAPSHOT_ATOMIC_RESTORE to succeed
>
> -SNAPSHOT_UNFREEZE - thaw user space processes frozen by SNAPSHOT_FREEZE
> +SNAPSHOT_UNFREEZE
> + thaw user space processes frozen by SNAPSHOT_FREEZE
>
> -SNAPSHOT_CREATE_IMAGE - create a snapshot of the system memory; the
> +SNAPSHOT_CREATE_IMAGE
> + create a snapshot of the system memory; the
> last argument of ioctl() should be a pointer to an int variable,
> the value of which will indicate whether the call returned after
> creating the snapshot (1) or after restoring the system memory state
> @@ -45,48 +51,59 @@ SNAPSHOT_CREATE_IMAGE - create a snapshot of the system memory; the
> has been created the read() operation can be used to transfer
> it out of the kernel
>
> -SNAPSHOT_ATOMIC_RESTORE - restore the system memory state from the
> +SNAPSHOT_ATOMIC_RESTORE
> + restore the system memory state from the
> uploaded snapshot image; before calling it you should transfer
> the system memory snapshot back to the kernel using the write()
> operation; this call will not succeed if the snapshot
> image is not available to the kernel
>
> -SNAPSHOT_FREE - free memory allocated for the snapshot image
> +SNAPSHOT_FREE
> + free memory allocated for the snapshot image
>
> -SNAPSHOT_PREF_IMAGE_SIZE - set the preferred maximum size of the image
> +SNAPSHOT_PREF_IMAGE_SIZE
> + set the preferred maximum size of the image
> (the kernel will do its best to ensure the image size will not exceed
> this number, but if it turns out to be impossible, the kernel will
> create the smallest image possible)
>
> -SNAPSHOT_GET_IMAGE_SIZE - return the actual size of the hibernation image
> +SNAPSHOT_GET_IMAGE_SIZE
> + return the actual size of the hibernation image
>
> -SNAPSHOT_AVAIL_SWAP_SIZE - return the amount of available swap in bytes (the
> +SNAPSHOT_AVAIL_SWAP_SIZE
> + return the amount of available swap in bytes (the
> last argument should be a pointer to an unsigned int variable that will
> contain the result if the call is successful).
>
> -SNAPSHOT_ALLOC_SWAP_PAGE - allocate a swap page from the resume partition
> +SNAPSHOT_ALLOC_SWAP_PAGE
> + allocate a swap page from the resume partition
> (the last argument should be a pointer to a loff_t variable that
> will contain the swap page offset if the call is successful)
>
> -SNAPSHOT_FREE_SWAP_PAGES - free all swap pages allocated by
> +SNAPSHOT_FREE_SWAP_PAGES
> + free all swap pages allocated by
> SNAPSHOT_ALLOC_SWAP_PAGE
>
> -SNAPSHOT_SET_SWAP_AREA - set the resume partition and the offset (in <PAGE_SIZE>
> +SNAPSHOT_SET_SWAP_AREA
> + set the resume partition and the offset (in <PAGE_SIZE>
> units) from the beginning of the partition at which the swap header is
> located (the last ioctl() argument should point to a struct
> resume_swap_area, as defined in kernel/power/suspend_ioctls.h,
> containing the resume device specification and the offset); for swap
> partitions the offset is always 0, but it is different from zero for
> - swap files (see Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.txt for
> + swap files (see Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.rst for
> details).
>
> -SNAPSHOT_PLATFORM_SUPPORT - enable/disable the hibernation platform support,
> +SNAPSHOT_PLATFORM_SUPPORT
> + enable/disable the hibernation platform support,
> depending on the argument value (enable, if the argument is nonzero)
>
> -SNAPSHOT_POWER_OFF - make the kernel transition the system to the hibernation
> +SNAPSHOT_POWER_OFF
> + make the kernel transition the system to the hibernation
> state (eg. ACPI S4) using the platform (eg. ACPI) driver
>
> -SNAPSHOT_S2RAM - suspend to RAM; using this call causes the kernel to
> +SNAPSHOT_S2RAM
> + suspend to RAM; using this call causes the kernel to
> immediately enter the suspend-to-RAM state, so this call must always
> be preceded by the SNAPSHOT_FREEZE call and it is also necessary
> to use the SNAPSHOT_UNFREEZE call after the system wakes up. This call
> @@ -98,10 +115,11 @@ SNAPSHOT_S2RAM - suspend to RAM; using this call causes the kernel to
>
> The device's read() operation can be used to transfer the snapshot image from
> the kernel. It has the following limitations:
> +
> - you cannot read() more than one virtual memory page at a time
> - read()s across page boundaries are impossible (ie. if you read() 1/2 of
> - a page in the previous call, you will only be able to read()
> - _at_ _most_ 1/2 of the page in the next call)
> + a page in the previous call, you will only be able to read()
> + **at most** 1/2 of the page in the next call)
>
> The device's write() operation is used for uploading the system memory snapshot
> into the kernel. It has the same limitations as the read() operation.
> @@ -143,8 +161,10 @@ preferably using mlockall(), before calling SNAPSHOT_FREEZE.
> The suspending utility MUST check the value stored by SNAPSHOT_CREATE_IMAGE
> in the memory location pointed to by the last argument of ioctl() and proceed
> in accordance with it:
> +
> 1. If the value is 1 (ie. the system memory snapshot has just been
> created and the system is ready for saving it):
> +
> (a) The suspending utility MUST NOT close the snapshot device
> _unless_ the whole suspend procedure is to be cancelled, in
> which case, if the snapshot image has already been saved, the
> @@ -158,6 +178,7 @@ in accordance with it:
> called. However, it MAY mount a file system that was not
> mounted at that time and perform some operations on it (eg.
> use it for saving the image).
> +
> 2. If the value is 0 (ie. the system state has just been restored from
> the snapshot image), the suspending utility MUST close the snapshot
> device. Afterwards it will be treated as a regular userland process,
> diff --git a/Documentation/power/video.txt b/Documentation/power/video.rst
> similarity index 56%
> rename from Documentation/power/video.txt
> rename to Documentation/power/video.rst
> index 3e6272bc4472..337a2ba9f32f 100644
> --- a/Documentation/power/video.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/power/video.rst
> @@ -1,7 +1,8 @@
> +===========================
> +Video issues with S3 resume
> +===========================
>
> - Video issues with S3 resume
> - ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> - 2003-2006, Pavel Machek
> +2003-2006, Pavel Machek
>
> During S3 resume, hardware needs to be reinitialized. For most
> devices, this is easy, and kernel driver knows how to do
> @@ -41,37 +42,37 @@ There are a few types of systems where video works after S3 resume:
> (1) systems where video state is preserved over S3.
>
> (2) systems where it is possible to call the video BIOS during S3
> - resume. Unfortunately, it is not correct to call the video BIOS at
> - that point, but it happens to work on some machines. Use
> - acpi_sleep=s3_bios.
> + resume. Unfortunately, it is not correct to call the video BIOS at
> + that point, but it happens to work on some machines. Use
> + acpi_sleep=s3_bios.
>
> (3) systems that initialize video card into vga text mode and where
> - the BIOS works well enough to be able to set video mode. Use
> - acpi_sleep=s3_mode on these.
> + the BIOS works well enough to be able to set video mode. Use
> + acpi_sleep=s3_mode on these.
>
> (4) on some systems s3_bios kicks video into text mode, and
> - acpi_sleep=s3_bios,s3_mode is needed.
> + acpi_sleep=s3_bios,s3_mode is needed.
>
> (5) radeon systems, where X can soft-boot your video card. You'll need
> - a new enough X, and a plain text console (no vesafb or radeonfb). See
> - http://www.doesi.gmxhome.de/linux/tm800s3/s3.html for more information.
> - Alternatively, you should use vbetool (6) instead.
> + a new enough X, and a plain text console (no vesafb or radeonfb). See
> + http://www.doesi.gmxhome.de/linux/tm800s3/s3.html for more information.
> + Alternatively, you should use vbetool (6) instead.
>
> (6) other radeon systems, where vbetool is enough to bring system back
> - to life. It needs text console to be working. Do vbetool vbestate
> - save > /tmp/delme; echo 3 > /proc/acpi/sleep; vbetool post; vbetool
> - vbestate restore < /tmp/delme; setfont <whatever>, and your video
> - should work.
> + to life. It needs text console to be working. Do vbetool vbestate
> + save > /tmp/delme; echo 3 > /proc/acpi/sleep; vbetool post; vbetool
> + vbestate restore < /tmp/delme; setfont <whatever>, and your video
> + should work.
>
> (7) on some systems, it is possible to boot most of kernel, and then
> - POSTing bios works. Ole Rohne has patch to do just that at
> - http://dev.gentoo.org/~marineam/patch-radeonfb-2.6.11-rc2-mm2.
> + POSTing bios works. Ole Rohne has patch to do just that at
> + http://dev.gentoo.org/~marineam/patch-radeonfb-2.6.11-rc2-mm2.
>
> -(8) on some systems, you can use the video_post utility and or
> - do echo 3 > /sys/power/state && /usr/sbin/video_post - which will
> - initialize the display in console mode. If you are in X, you can switch
> - to a virtual terminal and back to X using CTRL+ALT+F1 - CTRL+ALT+F7 to get
> - the display working in graphical mode again.
> +(8) on some systems, you can use the video_post utility and or
> + do echo 3 > /sys/power/state && /usr/sbin/video_post - which will
> + initialize the display in console mode. If you are in X, you can switch
> + to a virtual terminal and back to X using CTRL+ALT+F1 - CTRL+ALT+F7 to get
> + the display working in graphical mode again.
>
> Now, if you pass acpi_sleep=something, and it does not work with your
> bios, you'll get a hard crash during resume. Be careful. Also it is
> @@ -87,99 +88,126 @@ chance of working.
>
> Table of known working notebooks:
>
> +
> +=============================== ===============================================
> Model hack (or "how to do it")
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> +=============================== ===============================================
> Acer Aspire 1406LC ole's late BIOS init (7), turn off DRI
> Acer TM 230 s3_bios (2)
> Acer TM 242FX vbetool (6)
> Acer TM C110 video_post (8)
> -Acer TM C300 vga=normal (only suspend on console, not in X), vbetool (6) or video_post (8)
> +Acer TM C300 vga=normal (only suspend on console, not in X),
> + vbetool (6) or video_post (8)
> Acer TM 4052LCi s3_bios (2)
> Acer TM 636Lci s3_bios,s3_mode (4)
> -Acer TM 650 (Radeon M7) vga=normal plus boot-radeon (5) gets text console back
> -Acer TM 660 ??? (*)
> -Acer TM 800 vga=normal, X patches, see webpage (5) or vbetool (6)
> -Acer TM 803 vga=normal, X patches, see webpage (5) or vbetool (6)
> +Acer TM 650 (Radeon M7) vga=normal plus boot-radeon (5) gets text
> + console back
> +Acer TM 660 ??? [#f1]_
> +Acer TM 800 vga=normal, X patches, see webpage (5)
> + or vbetool (6)
> +Acer TM 803 vga=normal, X patches, see webpage (5)
> + or vbetool (6)
> Acer TM 803LCi vga=normal, vbetool (6)
> Arima W730a vbetool needed (6)
> -Asus L2400D s3_mode (3)(***) (S1 also works OK)
> +Asus L2400D s3_mode (3) [#f2]_ (S1 also works OK)
> Asus L3350M (SiS 740) (6)
> Asus L3800C (Radeon M7) s3_bios (2) (S1 also works OK)
> -Asus M6887Ne vga=normal, s3_bios (2), use radeon driver instead of fglrx in x.org
> +Asus M6887Ne vga=normal, s3_bios (2), use radeon driver
> + instead of fglrx in x.org
> Athlon64 desktop prototype s3_bios (2)
> -Compal CL-50 ??? (*)
> +Compal CL-50 ??? [#f1]_
> Compaq Armada E500 - P3-700 none (1) (S1 also works OK)
> Compaq Evo N620c vga=normal, s3_bios (2)
> Dell 600m, ATI R250 Lf none (1), but needs xorg-x11-6.8.1.902-1
> Dell D600, ATI RV250 vga=normal and X, or try vbestate (6)
> -Dell D610 vga=normal and X (possibly vbestate (6) too, but not tested)
> -Dell Inspiron 4000 ??? (*)
> -Dell Inspiron 500m ??? (*)
> +Dell D610 vga=normal and X (possibly vbestate (6) too,
> + but not tested)
> +Dell Inspiron 4000 ??? [#f1]_
> +Dell Inspiron 500m ??? [#f1]_
> Dell Inspiron 510m ???
> Dell Inspiron 5150 vbetool needed (6)
> -Dell Inspiron 600m ??? (*)
> -Dell Inspiron 8200 ??? (*)
> -Dell Inspiron 8500 ??? (*)
> -Dell Inspiron 8600 ??? (*)
> -eMachines athlon64 machines vbetool needed (6) (someone please get me model #s)
> -HP NC6000 s3_bios, may not use radeonfb (2); or vbetool (6)
> -HP NX7000 ??? (*)
> -HP Pavilion ZD7000 vbetool post needed, need open-source nv driver for X
> +Dell Inspiron 600m ??? [#f1]_
> +Dell Inspiron 8200 ??? [#f1]_
> +Dell Inspiron 8500 ??? [#f1]_
> +Dell Inspiron 8600 ??? [#f1]_
> +eMachines athlon64 machines vbetool needed (6) (someone please get
> + me model #s)
> +HP NC6000 s3_bios, may not use radeonfb (2);
> + or vbetool (6)
> +HP NX7000 ??? [#f1]_
> +HP Pavilion ZD7000 vbetool post needed, need open-source nv
> + driver for X
> HP Omnibook XE3 athlon version none (1)
> HP Omnibook XE3GC none (1), video is S3 Savage/IX-MV
> HP Omnibook XE3L-GF vbetool (6)
> HP Omnibook 5150 none (1), (S1 also works OK)
> -IBM TP T20, model 2647-44G none (1), video is S3 Inc. 86C270-294 Savage/IX-MV, vesafb gets "interesting" but X work.
> -IBM TP A31 / Type 2652-M5G s3_mode (3) [works ok with BIOS 1.04 2002-08-23, but not at all with BIOS 1.11 2004-11-05 :-(]
> +IBM TP T20, model 2647-44G none (1), video is S3 Inc. 86C270-294
> + Savage/IX-MV, vesafb gets "interesting"
> + but X work.
> +IBM TP A31 / Type 2652-M5G s3_mode (3) [works ok with
> + BIOS 1.04 2002-08-23, but not at all with
> + BIOS 1.11 2004-11-05 :-(]
> IBM TP R32 / Type 2658-MMG none (1)
> -IBM TP R40 2722B3G ??? (*)
> +IBM TP R40 2722B3G ??? [#f1]_
> IBM TP R50p / Type 1832-22U s3_bios (2)
> IBM TP R51 none (1)
> -IBM TP T30 236681A ??? (*)
> +IBM TP T30 236681A ??? [#f1]_
> IBM TP T40 / Type 2373-MU4 none (1)
> IBM TP T40p none (1)
> IBM TP R40p s3_bios (2)
> IBM TP T41p s3_bios (2), switch to X after resume
> IBM TP T42 s3_bios (2)
> IBM ThinkPad T42p (2373-GTG) s3_bios (2)
> -IBM TP X20 ??? (*)
> +IBM TP X20 ??? [#f1]_
> IBM TP X30 s3_bios, s3_mode (4)
> -IBM TP X31 / Type 2672-XXH none (1), use radeontool (http://fdd.com/software/radeon/) to turn off backlight.
> -IBM TP X32 none (1), but backlight is on and video is trashed after long suspend. s3_bios,s3_mode (4) works too. Perhaps that gets better results?
> +IBM TP X31 / Type 2672-XXH none (1), use radeontool
> + (http://fdd.com/software/radeon/) to
> + turn off backlight.
> +IBM TP X32 none (1), but backlight is on and video is
> + trashed after long suspend. s3_bios,
> + s3_mode (4) works too. Perhaps that gets
> + better results?
> IBM Thinkpad X40 Type 2371-7JG s3_bios,s3_mode (4)
> -IBM TP 600e none(1), but a switch to console and back to X is needed
> -Medion MD4220 ??? (*)
> +IBM TP 600e none(1), but a switch to console and
> + back to X is needed
> +Medion MD4220 ??? [#f1]_
> Samsung P35 vbetool needed (6)
> Sharp PC-AR10 (ATI rage) none (1), backlight does not switch off
> Sony Vaio PCG-C1VRX/K s3_bios (2)
> -Sony Vaio PCG-F403 ??? (*)
> +Sony Vaio PCG-F403 ??? [#f1]_
> Sony Vaio PCG-GRT995MP none (1), works with 'nv' X driver
> -Sony Vaio PCG-GR7/K none (1), but needs radeonfb, use radeontool (http://fdd.com/software/radeon/) to turn off backlight.
> -Sony Vaio PCG-N505SN ??? (*)
> +Sony Vaio PCG-GR7/K none (1), but needs radeonfb, use
> + radeontool (http://fdd.com/software/radeon/)
> + to turn off backlight.
> +Sony Vaio PCG-N505SN ??? [#f1]_
> Sony Vaio vgn-s260 X or boot-radeon can init it (5)
> -Sony Vaio vgn-S580BH vga=normal, but suspend from X. Console will be blank unless you return to X.
> +Sony Vaio vgn-S580BH vga=normal, but suspend from X. Console will
> + be blank unless you return to X.
> Sony Vaio vgn-FS115B s3_bios (2),s3_mode (4)
> Toshiba Libretto L5 none (1)
> Toshiba Libretto 100CT/110CT vbetool (6)
> Toshiba Portege 3020CT s3_mode (3)
> Toshiba Satellite 4030CDT s3_mode (3) (S1 also works OK)
> Toshiba Satellite 4080XCDT s3_mode (3) (S1 also works OK)
> -Toshiba Satellite 4090XCDT ??? (*)
> -Toshiba Satellite P10-554 s3_bios,s3_mode (4)(****)
> +Toshiba Satellite 4090XCDT ??? [#f1]_
> +Toshiba Satellite P10-554 s3_bios,s3_mode (4)[#f3]_
> Toshiba M30 (2) xor X with nvidia driver using internal AGP
> -Uniwill 244IIO ??? (*)
> +Uniwill 244IIO ??? [#f1]_
> +=============================== ===============================================
>
> Known working desktop systems
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> +=================== ============================= ========================
> Mainboard Graphics card hack (or "how to do it")
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> +=================== ============================= ========================
> Asus A7V8X nVidia RIVA TNT2 model 64 s3_bios,s3_mode (4)
> +=================== ============================= ========================
>
>
> -(*) from https://wiki.ubuntu.com/HoaryPMResults, not sure
> - which options to use. If you know, please tell me.
> +.. [#f1] from https://wiki.ubuntu.com/HoaryPMResults, not sure
> + which options to use. If you know, please tell me.
>
> -(***) To be tested with a newer kernel.
> +.. [#f2] To be tested with a newer kernel.
>
> -(****) Not with SMP kernel, UP only.
> +.. [#f3] Not with SMP kernel, UP only.
> diff --git a/Documentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst b/Documentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst
> index 58bc047e7b95..1acaa14903d6 100644
> --- a/Documentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst
> +++ b/Documentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst
> @@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ PM support:
> implemented") error. You should also try to make sure that your
> driver uses as little power as possible when it's not doing
> anything. For the driver testing instructions see
> - Documentation/power/drivers-testing.txt and for a relatively
> + Documentation/power/drivers-testing.rst and for a relatively
> complete overview of the power management issues related to
> drivers see :ref:`Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst <driverapi_pm_devices>`.
>
> diff --git a/Documentation/scheduler/sched-energy.txt b/Documentation/scheduler/sched-energy.txt
> index 197d81f4b836..d97207b9accb 100644
> --- a/Documentation/scheduler/sched-energy.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/scheduler/sched-energy.txt
> @@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ the highest.
>
> The actual EM used by EAS is _not_ maintained by the scheduler, but by a
> dedicated framework. For details about this framework and what it provides,
> -please refer to its documentation (see Documentation/power/energy-model.txt).
> +please refer to its documentation (see Documentation/power/energy-model.rst).
>
>
> 2. Background and Terminology
> @@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ through the arch_scale_cpu_capacity() callback.
>
> The rest of platform knowledge used by EAS is directly read from the Energy
> Model (EM) framework. The EM of a platform is composed of a power cost table
> -per 'performance domain' in the system (see Documentation/power/energy-model.txt
> +per 'performance domain' in the system (see Documentation/power/energy-model.rst
> for futher details about performance domains).
>
> The scheduler manages references to the EM objects in the topology code when the
> @@ -352,7 +352,7 @@ could be amended in the future if proven otherwise.
> EAS uses the EM of a platform to estimate the impact of scheduling decisions on
> energy. So, your platform must provide power cost tables to the EM framework in
> order to make EAS start. To do so, please refer to documentation of the
> -independent EM framework in Documentation/power/energy-model.txt.
> +independent EM framework in Documentation/power/energy-model.rst.
>
> Please also note that the scheduling domains need to be re-built after the
> EM has been registered in order to start EAS.
> diff --git a/Documentation/trace/coresight-cpu-debug.txt b/Documentation/trace/coresight-cpu-debug.txt
> index f07e38094b40..1a660a39e3c0 100644
> --- a/Documentation/trace/coresight-cpu-debug.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/trace/coresight-cpu-debug.txt
> @@ -151,7 +151,7 @@ At the runtime you can disable idle states with below methods:
>
> It is possible to disable CPU idle states by way of the PM QoS
> subsystem, more specifically by using the "/dev/cpu_dma_latency"
> -interface (see Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.txt for more
> +interface (see Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.rst for more
> details). As specified in the PM QoS documentation the requested
> parameter will stay in effect until the file descriptor is released.
> For example:
> diff --git a/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/process/submitting-drivers.rst b/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/process/submitting-drivers.rst
> index 72c6cd935821..f1c3906c69a8 100644
> --- a/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/process/submitting-drivers.rst
> +++ b/Documentation/translations/zh_CN/process/submitting-drivers.rst
> @@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ Linux 2.6:
> 函数定义成返回 -ENOSYS(功能未实现)错误。你还应该尝试确
> 保你的驱动在什么都不干的情况下将耗电降到最低。要获得驱动
> 程序测试的指导,请参阅
> - Documentation/power/drivers-testing.txt。有关驱动程序电
> + Documentation/power/drivers-testing.rst。有关驱动程序电
> 源管理问题相对全面的概述,请参阅
> Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst。
>
> diff --git a/MAINTAINERS b/MAINTAINERS
> index 5fdbf6e78d46..1c9ed0a5a9df 100644
> --- a/MAINTAINERS
> +++ b/MAINTAINERS
> @@ -6491,7 +6491,7 @@ M: "Rafael J. Wysocki" <rjw@rjwysocki.net>
> M: Pavel Machek <pavel@ucw.cz>
> L: linux-pm@vger.kernel.org
> S: Supported
> -F: Documentation/power/freezing-of-tasks.txt
> +F: Documentation/power/freezing-of-tasks.rst
> F: include/linux/freezer.h
> F: kernel/freezer.c
>
> @@ -11825,7 +11825,7 @@ S: Maintained
> T: git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/vireshk/pm.git
> F: drivers/opp/
> F: include/linux/pm_opp.h
> -F: Documentation/power/opp.txt
> +F: Documentation/power/opp.rst
> F: Documentation/devicetree/bindings/opp/
>
> OPL4 DRIVER
> diff --git a/arch/x86/Kconfig b/arch/x86/Kconfig
> index a109141a8d3b..bc5e1c218d4d 100644
> --- a/arch/x86/Kconfig
> +++ b/arch/x86/Kconfig
> @@ -2448,7 +2448,7 @@ menuconfig APM
> machines with more than one CPU.
>
> In order to use APM, you will need supporting software. For location
> - and more information, read <file:Documentation/power/apm-acpi.txt>
> + and more information, read <file:Documentation/power/apm-acpi.rst>
> and the Battery Powered Linux mini-HOWTO, available from
> <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
>
> diff --git a/drivers/gpu/drm/i915/i915_drv.h b/drivers/gpu/drm/i915/i915_drv.h
> index 0ea7f78ae227..eeb7edfa3597 100644
> --- a/drivers/gpu/drm/i915/i915_drv.h
> +++ b/drivers/gpu/drm/i915/i915_drv.h
> @@ -1069,7 +1069,7 @@ struct skl_wm_params {
> * to be disabled. This shouldn't happen and we'll print some error messages in
> * case it happens.
> *
> - * For more, read the Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt.
> + * For more, read the Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst.
> */
> struct i915_runtime_pm {
> atomic_t wakeref_count;
> diff --git a/drivers/opp/Kconfig b/drivers/opp/Kconfig
> index fe54d349d2e1..35dfc7e80f92 100644
> --- a/drivers/opp/Kconfig
> +++ b/drivers/opp/Kconfig
> @@ -11,4 +11,4 @@ config PM_OPP
> OPP layer organizes the data internally using device pointers
> representing individual voltage domains and provides SOC
> implementations a ready to use framework to manage OPPs.
> - For more information, read <file:Documentation/power/opp.txt>
> + For more information, read <file:Documentation/power/opp.rst>
> diff --git a/drivers/power/supply/power_supply_core.c b/drivers/power/supply/power_supply_core.c
> index 136e8f64848a..b55cdfe22a2e 100644
> --- a/drivers/power/supply/power_supply_core.c
> +++ b/drivers/power/supply/power_supply_core.c
> @@ -606,7 +606,7 @@ int power_supply_get_battery_info(struct power_supply *psy,
>
> /* The property and field names below must correspond to elements
> * in enum power_supply_property. For reasoning, see
> - * Documentation/power/power_supply_class.txt.
> + * Documentation/power/power_supply_class.rst.
> */
>
> of_property_read_u32(battery_np, "energy-full-design-microwatt-hours",
> diff --git a/include/linux/interrupt.h b/include/linux/interrupt.h
> index c7eef32e7739..5b8328a99b2a 100644
> --- a/include/linux/interrupt.h
> +++ b/include/linux/interrupt.h
> @@ -52,7 +52,7 @@
> * irq line disabled until the threaded handler has been run.
> * IRQF_NO_SUSPEND - Do not disable this IRQ during suspend. Does not guarantee
> * that this interrupt will wake the system from a suspended
> - * state. See Documentation/power/suspend-and-interrupts.txt
> + * state. See Documentation/power/suspend-and-interrupts.rst
> * IRQF_FORCE_RESUME - Force enable it on resume even if IRQF_NO_SUSPEND is set
> * IRQF_NO_THREAD - Interrupt cannot be threaded
> * IRQF_EARLY_RESUME - Resume IRQ early during syscore instead of at device
> diff --git a/include/linux/pci.h b/include/linux/pci.h
> index 44d254548ca7..41c5673aba2f 100644
> --- a/include/linux/pci.h
> +++ b/include/linux/pci.h
> @@ -808,7 +808,7 @@ struct module;
> * @suspend_late: Put device into low power state.
> * @resume_early: Wake device from low power state.
> * @resume: Wake device from low power state.
> - * (Please see Documentation/power/pci.txt for descriptions
> + * (Please see Documentation/power/pci.rst for descriptions
> * of PCI Power Management and the related functions.)
> * @shutdown: Hook into reboot_notifier_list (kernel/sys.c).
> * Intended to stop any idling DMA operations.
> diff --git a/include/linux/pm.h b/include/linux/pm.h
> index 345d74a727e3..220e2008467d 100644
> --- a/include/linux/pm.h
> +++ b/include/linux/pm.h
> @@ -271,7 +271,7 @@ typedef struct pm_message {
> * actions to be performed by a device driver's callbacks generally depend on
> * the platform and subsystem the device belongs to.
> *
> - * Refer to Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt for more information about the
> + * Refer to Documentation/power/runtime_pm.rst for more information about the
> * role of the @runtime_suspend(), @runtime_resume() and @runtime_idle()
> * callbacks in device runtime power management.
> */
> diff --git a/kernel/power/Kconfig b/kernel/power/Kconfig
> index ff8592ddedee..d3667b4075c1 100644
> --- a/kernel/power/Kconfig
> +++ b/kernel/power/Kconfig
> @@ -66,7 +66,7 @@ config HIBERNATION
> need to run mkswap against the swap partition used for the suspend.
>
> It also works with swap files to a limited extent (for details see
> - <file:Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.txt>).
> + <file:Documentation/power/swsusp-and-swap-files.rst>).
>
> Right now you may boot without resuming and resume later but in the
> meantime you cannot use the swap partition(s)/file(s) involved in
> @@ -75,7 +75,7 @@ config HIBERNATION
> MOUNT any journaled filesystems mounted before the suspend or they
> will get corrupted in a nasty way.
>
> - For more information take a look at <file:Documentation/power/swsusp.txt>.
> + For more information take a look at <file:Documentation/power/swsusp.rst>.
>
> config ARCH_SAVE_PAGE_KEYS
> bool
> @@ -256,7 +256,7 @@ config APM_EMULATION
> notification of APM "events" (e.g. battery status change).
>
> In order to use APM, you will need supporting software. For location
> - and more information, read <file:Documentation/power/apm-acpi.txt>
> + and more information, read <file:Documentation/power/apm-acpi.rst>
> and the Battery Powered Linux mini-HOWTO, available from
> <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
>
> diff --git a/net/wireless/Kconfig b/net/wireless/Kconfig
> index 6310ddede220..cc70f5932773 100644
> --- a/net/wireless/Kconfig
> +++ b/net/wireless/Kconfig
> @@ -166,7 +166,7 @@ config CFG80211_DEFAULT_PS
>
> If this causes your applications to misbehave you should fix your
> applications instead -- they need to register their network
> - latency requirement, see Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.txt.
> + latency requirement, see Documentation/power/pm_qos_interface.rst.
>
> config CFG80211_DEBUGFS
> bool "cfg80211 DebugFS entries"
> --
> 2.21.0
>

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-06-13 17:58    [W:0.596 / U:10.904 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site