lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Feb]   [11]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 2/2] selftests/x86/fsgsbase: Default to trying to run the test repeatedly

* Mark Brown <broonie@kernel.org> wrote:

> On Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 09:49:16AM +0100, Ingo Molnar wrote:
>
> > So this isn't very user-friendly either, previously it would run a
> > testcase and immediately provide output.
>
> > Now it's just starting and 'hanging':
>
> > galatea:~/linux/linux/tools/testing/selftests/x86> ./fsgsbase_64
>
> > I got bored and Ctrl-C-ed it after ~30 seconds.
>
> > How long is this supposed to run, and why isn't the user informed?
>
> On Intel systems I've got access to it's tended to only run for less
> than 10 seconds for me with excursions up to ~30s at most, I'd have
> projected it to be about a minute if the tests pass. However retesting
> with Debian's v4.19 kernel it seems to be running a lot more stably so
> we're now seeing it run to completion reliably when just one copy of the
> test is running.
>
> AFAICT it's not terribly idiomatic to provide much output, and anything
> that was per iteration would be *way* too spammy.

Certainly - but a "please wait" and updating the current count via \r
once every second isn't spammy.

> > Also, testcases should really be short, so I think a better approach
> > would be to thread the test-case and start an instance on every CPU. That
> > should also excercise SMP bugs, if any.
>
> Well, a *better* approach would be for the underlying issue that the
> test is finding to be fixed.
>
> I didn't look at adding more threads as the test case is already
> threaded, it does seem that running multiple copies simultaneously makes
> things reproduce more quickly so it's definitely useful though it's
> still taking multiple iterations.

multiple iterations are fine - waiting a minute with zero output on the
console isn't.

Thanks,

Ingo

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-02-11 13:52    [W:0.043 / U:19.628 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site