lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2018]   [Oct]   [12]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: 9p/RDMA for syzkaller (Was: BUG: corrupted list in p9_read_work)
On Thu, Oct 11, 2018 at 4:19 PM, Dominique Martinet
<asmadeus@codewreck.org> wrote:
> Dmitry Vyukov wrote on Thu, Oct 11, 2018:
>> But again we don't need to support all of the available hardware.
>
> I agree with that, I just have no idea what the "librxe-rdmav16.so" lib
> could be doing and described something I am slightly more familiar with
> (e.g. libmlx5)
> I talked about a common subset of the verb abi because I didn't want to
> look into what it's doing, but if it's not enough there's always that
> possibility.
>
>
>> For example, we are testing net stack from external side using tun.
>> tun is a very simple, virtual abstraction of a network card. It allows
>> us to test all of generic net stack starting from L2 without messing
>> with any real drivers and their differences entirely. I had impression
>> that we are talking about something similar here too. Or not?
>
> That sounds about right, rxe is a software implementation that should
> work on most network interfaces ; at least from what I tried it worked
> on a VM's virtio net down to my laptop's wifi interface so it's a good
> start... I'm not saying all because I just tried a dummy interface and
> that returned EINVAL.
> The only point I disagree is the 'very simple', even getting that to
> work will be a far cry from a socket() call... :)
>
>
>> Also I am a bit missing context about rdma<->9p interface. Do we need
>> to setup all these ring buffers to satisfy the parts that 9p needs? Is
>> it that 9p actually reads data directly from these ring buffers? Or
>> there is some higher-level rdma interface that 9p uses?
>
> It needs an "RDMA_PS_TCP" connection established, that requires
> everything I described unfortunately...
> Once that's established we need to register some memory to the driver
> and post some recv buffers (even if we won't read it, the client would
> get errors if we aren't ready to receive anything - at least it does
> with real hardware), and also use some registered memory to send data.
>
> Thinking back though I think that my server implementation isn't very
> far from the raw level in what I'm doing, I recall libibverbs fallback
> implementation (e.g. if the driver lib doesn't implement it otherwise)
> of the functions I looked at like ibv_post_send to mostly be just
> serializing the arguments, slapping the command from an enum in front of
> it and sending it to the kernel, so it might be enough to just
> reimplement that shim in or figure a way to generate the binary commands
> once and then use these values; now I'm comparing two runs of strace of
> my test server I definitely see a pattern.
>
> I'll give it a try but don't expect something fast, and it's probably
> not going to be very pretty either...
>
> To give a concrete example, here are all the read/write/fcntl calls
> looking just at /dev/infiniband in a hello world program that just
> establishes connection (server side), receive and send two messages and
> quits:
>
>
> This part apparently sets up the listening connection of the server:
>
> 1430 1539262699.126025 openat(AT_FDCWD, "/dev/infiniband/rdma_cm", O_RDWR|O_CLOEXEC) = 3
> 1430 1539262699.126155 write(3, "\0\0\0\0\30\0\4\0@m'\1\0\0\0\0\344\327\375\271\374\177\0\0?\1\2\0\0\0\0\0", 32) = 32
> 1430 1539262699.126192 write(3, "\24\0\0\0\210\0\0\0\0\0\0\0000\0\0\0\33\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\6\0\0\377\377\377\377\377\377\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 144) = 144
> 1430 1539262699.126223 write(3, "\23\0\0\0\20\0\20\1 \326\375\271\374\177\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262699.126250 write(3, "\23\0\0\0\20\0\20\1 \326\375\271\374\177\0\0\0\0\0\0\2\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262699.126274 write(3, "\1\0\0\0\20\0\4\0\324\327\375\271\374\177\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262699.126303 close(3) = 0
> 1430 1539262699.126360 openat(AT_FDCWD, "/dev/infiniband/rdma_cm", O_RDWR|O_CLOEXEC) = 3
> 1430 1539262699.126429 write(3, "\0\0\0\0\30\0\4\0\240\217'\1\0\0\0\0t\330\375\271\374\177\0\0\6\1\2\0\0\0\0\0", 32) = 32
> 1430 1539262699.126472 write(3, "\24\0\0\0\210\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\34\0\0\0\n\0\4\323\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 144) = 144
> 1430 1539262699.126501 write(3, "\23\0\0\0\20\0\20\1p\326\375\271\374\177\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262699.126534 write(3, "\23\0\0\0\20\0\20\1p\326\375\271\374\177\0\0\0\0\0\0\2\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262699.127119 write(3, "\7\0\0\0\10\0\0\0\0\0\0\0@\0\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1430 1539262699.127149 write(3, "\23\0\0\0\20\0\20\1`\327\375\271\374\177\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262699.127319 fcntl(3, F_GETFL) = 0x8002 (flags O_RDWR|O_LARGEFILE)
> 1430 1539262699.127348 fcntl(3, F_SETFL, O_RDWR|O_NONBLOCK|O_LARGEFILE <unfinished ...>
>
> Then the client connects (had some epoll on read on fd 3, but no read?!)
>
> 1446 1539262706.268685 write(3, "\f\0\0\0\10\0H\1\200\307\211\302G\177\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1446 1539262706.268718 write(3, "\23\0\0\0\20\0\20\1\240\304\211\302G\177\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1446 1539262706.269440 openat(AT_FDCWD, "/dev/infiniband/uverbs0", O_RDWR|O_CLOEXEC) = 5
> 1446 1539262706.269474 write(5, "\0\0\0\0\4\0\2\0H\302\211\302G\177\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1446 1539262706.269503 write(5, "\1\0\0\0\4\0,\0\220\301\211\302G\177\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1446 1539262706.269545 write(5, "\2\0\0\0\6\0\n\0\20\302\211\302G\177\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1446 1539262706.269571 write(5, "\3\0\0\0\4\0\1\0\314\303\211\302G\177\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1446 1539262706.269596 write(3, "\23\0\0\0\20\0\20\1\240\304\211\302G\177\0\0\2\0\0\0\2\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1446 1539262706.269618 write(3, "\23\0\0\0\20\0\270\1\200\303\211\302G\177\0\0\2\0\0\0\1\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262706.269801 write(5, "\3\0\0\0\4\0\1\0\354\330\375\271\374\177\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1430 1539262706.269944 write(5, "\21\0\0\0\4\0\1\0T\330\375\271\374\177\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1430 1539262706.270000 write(5, "\22\0\0\0\n\0\6\0 \330\375\271\374\177\0\0`\232'\1\0\0\0\0006\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\7\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 40) = 40
> 1430 1539262706.270203 write(5, "\27\0\0\0\4\0\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1430 1539262706.270262 write(5, "\30\0\0\0\20\0\20\0000\327\375\271\374\177\0\0\20\233'\1\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\2\0\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0002\0\0\0\4\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\2\0\0", 64) = 64
> 1430 1539262706.270482 write(3, "\v\0\0\0\20\0\220\0p\326\375\271\374\177\0\0\2\0\0\0\1\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262706.270546 write(5, "\32\0\0\0\36\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\3\0\0\09\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\16\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 120) = 120
> 1430 1539262706.270677 write(5, "\t\0\0\0\f\0\3\0\224\330\375\271\374\177\0\0\20p)\302G\177\0\0\0\0@\0\0\0\0\0\20p)\302G\177\0\0\1\0\0\0\1\0\0\0", 48) = 48
> 1430 1539262706.271973 write(5, "\t\0\0\0\f\0\3\0D\330\375\271\374\177\0\0\210\362&\1\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\210\362&\1\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\1\0\0\0", 48) = 48
> 1430 1539262706.272060 write(3, "\v\0\0\0\20\0\220\0000\325\375\271\374\177\0\0\2\0\0\0\1\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262706.272110 write(5, "\32\0\0\0\36\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\3\0\0\09\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\16\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 120) = 120
> 1430 1539262706.272159 write(3, "\v\0\0\0\20\0\220\0000\325\375\271\374\177\0\0\2\0\0\0\2\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262706.272205 write(5, "\32\0\0\0\36\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\377\377\n*\21f\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1@\0\0\0\7\1\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\201\221\22\0\0\0\0\0\340\t\351\0\0\0\0\0\23\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\2\0\3\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 120) = 120
> 1430 1539262706.272439 write(3, "\v\0\0\0\20\0\220\0000\325\375\271\374\177\0\0\2\0\0\0\3\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262706.272496 write(5, "\32\0\0\0\36\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\1.\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\364((\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\23\7\7\0\0\0\0", 120) = 120
> 1430 1539262706.272565 write(3, "\10\0\0\0 \1\0\0\220\f\0\274G\177\0\0\24\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\1\0\0\n\1\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 296) = 296
> 1446 1539262706.272962 write(3, "\f\0\0\0\10\0H\1\200\307\211\302G\177\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1430 1539262706.274144 write(5, "\t\0\0\0\f\0\3\0D\330\375\271\374\177\0\0`\0\351\301G\177\0\0\0\0 \0\0\0\0\0`\0\351\301G\177\0\0\1\0\0\0\1\0\0\0", 48) = 48
>
>
> Some data is exchanged (we don't see the data as it's in buffers whose
> address was given earlier):
>
> 1464 1539262714.529679 write(5, "\27\0\0\0\4\0\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1464 1539262714.530059 write(5, "\34\0\0\0\10\0\1\0lT)\302G\177\0\0\3\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\200\0\0\0", 32) = 32
> 1464 1539262714.530634 write(5, "\27\0\0\0\4\0\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1430 1539262719.331307 write(5, "\34\0\0\0\10\0\1\0\374\327\375\271\374\177\0\0\3\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\200\0\0\0", 32) = 32
> 1464 1539262719.332113 write(5, "\27\0\0\0\4\0\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 16) = 16
>
> And disconnect:
>
> 1430 1539262721.192844 write(5, "\r\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\6\0\0\0", 12) = 12
> 1430 1539262721.193186 write(5, "\r\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\5\0\0\0", 12) = 12
> 1430 1539262721.193324 write(5, "\32\0\0\0\36\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 120) = 120
> 1430 1539262721.193567 write(3, "\n\0\0\0\4\0\0\0\2\0\0\0", 12) = 12
> 1446 1539262721.256556 write(3, "\f\0\0\0\10\0H\1\200\307\211\302G\177\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1430 1539262721.257618 write(3, "\1\0\0\0\20\0\4\0\204\327\375\271\374\177\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262721.257769 write(5, "\4\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 12) = 12
> 1430 1539262721.258369 write(5, "\27\0\0\0\4\0\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 16) = 16
> 1430 1539262721.258667 write(5, "\33\0\0\0\6\0\1\0T\327\375\271\374\177\0\0\3\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262721.259223 write(5, "\24\0\0\0\6\0\2\08\327\375\271\374\177\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262721.260476 write(3, "\1\0\0\0\20\0\4\0D\330\375\271\374\177\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 24) = 24
> 1430 1539262721.260726 close(3) = 0
> 1430 1539262721.261082 write(5, "\4\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\1\0\0\0", 12) = -1 EBUSY (Device or resource busy)
> 1430 1539262721.358728 write(5, "\r\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\4\0\0\0", 12) = 12
>
>
> I don't see any read on these fd despite epoll being set to wait for
> read events on these so I'm not quite sure where ibverbs knows if the
> commands worked or not, but hopefully that illustrats that it's slightly
> more complex than just socket/bind/listen/accept/write/close! :)

Yes, it seems so.

I guess I am still missing the big picture somewhat.
If we do "echo -n FOO > /sys/module/rdma_rxe/parameters/add" and let's
say FOO is a tun device. Does it mean that we will send/receive
packets from the tun? If yes, that would make things simpler. And do
we still need ring buffers in that case? If not and we still send/recv
via in-memory ring buffers, then why do we need tun at all?

Leon, maybe you know how to setup a stub rdma that we could use as 9p
transport? If we do this, I guess it will also expose lots of
interesting rdma code paths for testing.

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2018-10-12 16:51    [W:0.106 / U:0.164 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site