lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2017]   [Nov]   [27]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [PATCH V14 13/24] mmc: block: Add blk-mq support
From
Date
On 27/11/17 13:23, Ulf Hansson wrote:
> On 27 November 2017 at 11:20, Adrian Hunter <adrian.hunter@intel.com> wrote:
>> On 24/11/17 12:12, Ulf Hansson wrote:
>>> [...]
>>>
>>>> +/* Single sector read during recovery */
>>>> +static void mmc_blk_ss_read(struct mmc_queue *mq, struct request *req)
>>>
>>> Nitpick: I think mmc_blk_read_single() would be better as it is a more
>>> clear name. Would you mind changing it?
>>>
>>>> +{
>>>> + struct mmc_queue_req *mqrq = req_to_mmc_queue_req(req);
>>>> + blk_status_t status;
>>>> +
>>>> + while (1) {
>>>> + mmc_blk_rw_rq_prep(mqrq, mq->card, 1, mq);
>>>> +
>>>> + mmc_wait_for_req(mq->card->host, &mqrq->brq.mrq);
>>>> +
>>>> + /*
>>>> + * Not expecting command errors, so just give up in that case.
>>>> + * If there are retries remaining, the request will get
>>>> + * requeued.
>>>> + */
>>>> + if (mqrq->brq.cmd.error)
>>>> + return;
>>>
>>> What happens here if the reason to the error is because the card was removed?
>>
>> Assuming the rescan is waiting for the host claim, the next read / write
>> request will end up calling mmc_detect_card_removed() in the recovery.
>> After that all following requests will error immediately because
>> mmc_mq_queue_rq() calls mmc_card_removed().
>
> Yep, that seems reasonable. I have also tested this, so it seems to
> work as expected and similar as before.
>
>>
>>>
>>> I guess next time __blk_err_check() is called from the
>>> mmc_blk_mq_rw_recovery(), this will be detected and managed?
>>>
>>>> +
>>>> + if (blk_rq_bytes(req) <= 512)
>>>
>>> Shouldn't you check "if (blk_rq_bytes(req) < 512)"? How would you
>>> otherwise read the last 512 bytes block?
>>
>> At this point we have read the last sector but not updated the request, so
>> the number of bytes left should be 512. The reason we don't update the
>> request is so that the logic in mmc_blk_mq_complete_rq() will work. I will
>> add a comment.
>
> Not sure I get that, but I assume the comment will help me understand. :-)
>
>>
>>>
>>>> + break;
>>>> +
>>>> + status = mqrq->brq.data.error ? BLK_STS_IOERR : BLK_STS_OK;
>>>> +
>>>> + blk_update_request(req, status, 512);
>>>
>>> Shouldn't we actually bail out, unless the error is a data ECC error?
>>> On the other hand, I guess if it a more severe error, cmd.error will
>>> anyway be set above!?
>>>
>>> One more question, if there is a data error, we may want to try to
>>> recover by sending a stop command? How do we manage that?
>>
>> I was thinking a single-block read would not need a stop. I will think
>> some more about error handling here.
>
> Great!
>
> Anyway, you may be right - and perhaps it may not be worth adding
> error handling, especially if it complicates the code a lot.
>
> [...]
>
>>>> +static void mmc_blk_mq_acct_req_done(struct mmc_queue *mq, struct request *req)
>>>
>>> Nitpick: Can we please try to find a better name for this function. I
>>> don't think "acct" is good abbreviation because, to me, it's not
>>> self-explaining.
>>
>> What about mmc_blk_mq_decrement_in_flight() ?
>
> Looks good, or perhaps even: mmc_blk_mq_dec_in_flight().
>
>>
>>>
>>>> +{
>>>> + struct request_queue *q = req->q;
>>>> + unsigned long flags;
>>>> + bool put_card;
>>>> +
>>>> + spin_lock_irqsave(q->queue_lock, flags);
>>>> +
>>>> + mq->in_flight[mmc_issue_type(mq, req)] -= 1;
>>>> +
>>>> + put_card = (mmc_tot_in_flight(mq) == 0);
>>>> +
>>>> + spin_unlock_irqrestore(q->queue_lock, flags);
>>>> +
>>>> + if (put_card)
>>>> + mmc_put_card(mq->card, &mq->ctx);
>>>
>>> I have tried to convince myself that the protection of calling
>>> mmc_get|put_card() is safe, but I am not sure.
>>>
>>> I am wondering whether there could be races for mmc_get|put_card().
>>> Please see some more related comments below.
>>
>> mmc_put_card() is safe and necessary if we have seen mmc_tot_in_flight(mq)
>> == 0. When the next request arrives it will have to do a mmc_get_card()
>> because it is changing the number of requests in flight from 0 to 1. It
>> doesn't matter if that mmc_get_card() comes before or after or during this
>> mmc_put_card().
>>
>>>
>>> [...]
>
> [...]
>
>>>
>>> Anyway, then if using a queue_depth of 64, how will you make sure that
>>> you not end up having > 1 requests being prepared at the same time
>>> (not counting the one that may be in transfer)?
>>
>> We are currently single-threaded since every request goes through
>> hctx->run_work when BLK_MQ_F_BLOCKING and nr_hw_queues == 1. It might be
>> worth adding a mutex to ensure that never changes.
>>
>> This point also answers some of the questions below, since there can be no
>> parallel dispatches.
>
> Yeah, it clearly does. Thanks!
>
>>>> +
>>>> +enum mmc_issued mmc_blk_mq_issue_rq(struct mmc_queue *mq, struct request *req)
>>>> +{
>>>> + struct mmc_blk_data *md = mq->blkdata;
>>>> + struct mmc_card *card = md->queue.card;
>>>> + struct mmc_host *host = card->host;
>>>> + int ret;
>>>> +
>>>> + ret = mmc_blk_part_switch(card, md->part_type);
>>>
>>> What if there is an ongoing request, shouldn't you wait for that to
>>> complete before switching partition?
>>
>> Two requests on the same queue cannot be on different partitions because we
>> have a different queue (and block device) for each partition.
>
> That's not true for RPMB anymore I am afraid.
>
> RPMB shares the same queue as for the main eMMC partition, which is
> because we strive towards fair I/O scheduling across the hole device.

I hadn't thought of RPMB, but I think the logic is OK, which is good because
it is the same as we presently have. Here the md->part_type will be the
main area even for RPMB. So this switch won't do anything if we have a
request in flight. Then inside __mmc_blk_ioctl_cmd() the switch to RPMB is
done, and afterwards mmc_blk_issue_drv_op() switches it back again.

>
>>
>>>
>>>> + if (ret)
>>>> + return MMC_REQ_FAILED_TO_START;
>>>> +
>>>> + switch (mmc_issue_type(mq, req)) {
>>>> + case MMC_ISSUE_SYNC:
>>>> + ret = mmc_blk_wait_for_idle(mq, host);
>>>> + if (ret)
>>>> + return MMC_REQ_BUSY;
>>>
>>> Wouldn't it be possible that yet a new SYNC request becomes queued in
>>> parallel with this current one. Then, when reaching this point, how do
>>> you make sure that new request waits for the current "SYNC" request?
>>
>> As mentioned above, there are no parallel dispatches.
>>
>>>
>>> I mean is the above mmc_blk_wait_for_idle(), really sufficient to deal
>>> with synchronization?
>>
>> So long as there are no parallel dispatches.
>>
>>>
>>> I guess we could use mmc_claim_host(no-ctx) in some clever way to deal
>>> with this, or perhaps there is a better option?
>>
>> We are relying on there being no parallel dispatches. That is the case now,
>> but if it weren't we could use a mutex in mmc_mq_queue_rq().
>>
>
> Yeah, but then leave that until needed.
>
>>>
>>> BTW, I guess the problem is also present if there is SYNC request
>>> ongoing and then is a new ASYNC request coming in. Is the ASYNC
>>> request really waiting for the SYNC request to finish?
>>
>> With no parallel dispatches, the SYNC request runs to completion before
>> another request can be dispatched.
>
> Yes, I get it now. Thanks for clarifying this!
>
> [...]
>
>>>> +static blk_status_t mmc_mq_queue_rq(struct blk_mq_hw_ctx *hctx,
>>>> + const struct blk_mq_queue_data *bd)
>>>> +{
>>>> + struct request *req = bd->rq;
>>>> + struct request_queue *q = req->q;
>>>> + struct mmc_queue *mq = q->queuedata;
>>>> + struct mmc_card *card = mq->card;
>>>> + enum mmc_issue_type issue_type;
>>>> + enum mmc_issued issued;
>>>> + bool get_card;
>>>> + int ret;
>>>> +
>>>> + if (mmc_card_removed(mq->card)) {
>>>> + req->rq_flags |= RQF_QUIET;
>>>> + return BLK_STS_IOERR;
>>>> + }
>>>> +
>>>> + issue_type = mmc_issue_type(mq, req);
>>>> +
>>>> + spin_lock_irq(q->queue_lock);
>>>> +
>>>> + switch (issue_type) {
>>>> + case MMC_ISSUE_ASYNC:
>>>> + break;
>>>> + default:
>>>> + /*
>>>> + * Timeouts are handled by mmc core, and we don't have a host
>>>> + * API to abort requests, so we can't handle the timeout anyway.
>>>> + * However, when the timeout happens, blk_mq_complete_request()
>>>> + * no longer works (to stop the request disappearing under us).
>>>> + * To avoid racing with that, set a large timeout.
>>>> + */
>>>> + req->timeout = 600 * HZ;
>>>> + break;
>>>> + }
>>>> +
>>>> + mq->in_flight[issue_type] += 1;
>>>> + get_card = (mmc_tot_in_flight(mq) == 1);
>>>> +
>>>> + spin_unlock_irq(q->queue_lock);
>>>> +
>>>> + if (!(req->rq_flags & RQF_DONTPREP)) {
>>>> + req_to_mmc_queue_req(req)->retries = 0;
>>>> + req->rq_flags |= RQF_DONTPREP;
>>>> + }
>>>> +
>>>> + if (get_card)
>>>
>>> Coming back to the get_card() thingy, which I wonder if it's fragile.
>>>
>>> A request that finds get_card == true here, doesn't necessarily have
>>> to reach to this point first (the task may be preempted), in case
>>> there is another request being queued in parallel (or that can't
>>> happen?).
>>>
>>> That could then lead to that the following steps become executed for
>>> the other requests, prior anybody calling mmc_get_card().
>>
>> You are right, this logic does not support parallel dispatches.
>>
>
> This do raises a question, don't you think it would be beneficial,
> especially for CQE to allow parallel dispatches?
>
> I am not saying we should change this at this point, just that we may
> consider changing this for future improvements.

I think the benefit is limited because the time to dispatch a request is
small compared with the time to complete a request. i.e. a number of
requests can be queued before the first one has completed. But yes, it is
something to keep in mind.

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2017-11-27 15:16    [W:0.073 / U:12.560 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site