lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2017]   [Nov]   [27]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [bisected] system hang after boot
On Mon, 27 Nov 2017 12:54:56 +0000
Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com> wrote:

> Hi Martin,
>
> On Mon, Nov 27, 2017 at 01:49:18PM +0100, Martin Schwidefsky wrote:
> > On Mon, 27 Nov 2017 11:49:48 +0000
> > Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com> wrote:
> > > On Wed, Nov 22, 2017 at 09:22:17PM +0100, Peter Zijlstra wrote:
> > > > On Wed, Nov 22, 2017 at 06:26:59PM +0000, Will Deacon wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Now, I can't see what the break_lock is doing here other than causing
> > > > > problems. Is there a good reason for it, or can you just try removing it
> > > > > altogether? Patch below.
> > > >
> > > > The main use is spin_is_contended(), which in turn ends up used in
> > > > __cond_resched_lock() through spin_needbreak().
> > > >
> > > > This allows better lock wait times for PREEMPT kernels on platforms
> > > > where the lock implementation itself cannot provide 'contended' state.
> > > >
> > > > In that capacity the write-write race shouldn't be a problem though.
> > >
> > > I'm not sure why it isn't a problem: given that the break_lock variable
> > > can read as 1 for a lock that is no longer contended and 0 for a lock that
> > > is currently contended, then the __cond_resched_lock is likely to see a
> > > value of 0 (i.e. spin_needbreak always return false) more often than no
> > > since it's checked by the lock holder.
> >
> > Grepping for 'break_lock' the two locking blueprints are the only places
> > where the field is written to. Unless I am blind, the associated unlock
> > functions do *not* reset 'break_lock'.
> >
> > Without the raw_##op##_can_lock(lock) check the first of the blueprints
> > now looks like this:
> >
> > void __lockfunc __raw_##op##_lock(locktype##_t *lock) \
> > { \
> > for (;;) { \
> > preempt_disable(); \
> > if (likely(do_raw_##op##_trylock(lock))) \
> > break; \
> > preempt_enable(); \
> > \
> > if (!(lock)->break_lock) \
> > (lock)->break_lock = 1; \
> > while ((lock)->break_lock) \
> > arch_##op##_relax(&lock->raw_lock); \
> > } \
> > (lock)->break_lock = 0; \
> > } \
> >
> > All it takes to create an endless loop is two CPUs, the first acquired the
> > lock and the second tries to get the lock. After the unsuccessful trylock
> > of the second CPU, the first CPU releases the lock and never tries to take
> > it again. The second CPU will be stuck in an endless loop.
>
> Yes, it basically relies on the lock holder never winning that race.
> However, Peter's use-case just needs the lock-holder to be able to detect
> contention (which is always best-effort anyway), so I think we can make that
> "work" by removing the while loop above (see my subsequent diff sent to
> Sebastian).

Well, what race? The lock hold just has to hold the lock while another CPU
tries to get it. There is no particular bad timing involved, just a little
bit of contention is enough.

And yes, I think removing the while loop on break_lock will work.

> It's still questionable, because on a machine with store-buffers you really
> want to order writes to break_lock against something else, but it might
> happen to fall out depending on the details of the trylock() implementation.

Even more, if the compiler "proves" that nobody writes to break_lock it can
convert that to "while (1)" loop.

> > I guess my best course of action is to remove GENERIC_LOCKBREAK from
> > arch/s390/Kconfig to avoid this construct altogether. Let us see what
> > breaks if I do that ..
>
> We could just consider ripping out GENERIC_LOCKBREAK entirely, but I was
> hoping we could get a simpler fix in for now.

I would opt for removing it entirely.

--
blue skies,
Martin.

"Reality continues to ruin my life." - Calvin.

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2017-11-27 14:01    [W:0.039 / U:2.216 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site