lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2017]   [Nov]   [20]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [RFC PATCH v3 for 4.15 08/24] Provide cpu_opv system call
----- On Nov 20, 2017, at 1:49 PM, Andi Kleen andi@firstfloor.org wrote:

>> Having cpu_opv do a 4k memcpy allow it to handle scenarios where
>> rseq fails to progress.
>
> If anybody ever gets that right. It will be really hard to just
> test such a path.
>
> It also seems fairly theoretical to me. Do you even have a
> test case where the normal path stops making forward progress?

We expect the following loop to progress, typically after a single
iteration:

do {
cpu = rseq_cpu_start();
ret = rseq_addv(&v, 1, cpu);
attempts++;
} while (ret);

Now runnig this in gdb, break on "main", run, and single-step
execution with "next", the program is stuck in an infinite loop.

What solution do you have in mind to handle this kind of
scenario without breaking pre-existing debuggers ?

Looking at vDSO examples of vgetcpu and vclock_gettime under
gdb 7.7.1 (debian) with glibc 2.19:

sched_getcpu behavior under single-stepping per source line
with "step" seems to only see the ../sysdeps/unix/sysv/linux/x86_64/sched_getcpu.S
source lines, which makes it skip single-stepping of the vDSO.

sched_getcpu under "stepi": it does go through the vDSO instruction
addresses. It does progress, given that there is no loop there.

clock_gettime under "step": it only sees source lines of
../sysdeps/unix/clock_gettime.c.

clock_gettime under "stepi": it's stuck in an infinite loop.

So instruction-level stepping from gdb turns clock_gettime vDSO
into a never-ending loop, which is already bad. But with rseq,
the situation is even worse, because it turns source line level
single-stepping into infinite loops.

My understanding from https://sourceware.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=14466
is that GDB currently simply removes the vDSO from its list of library
mappings, which is probably why it skips over vDSO for the source
lines single-stepping case. We cannot do that with rseq, because we
_want_ the rseq critical section to be inlined into the application
or library. A function call costs more than most rseq critical sections.

I plan to have the rseq user-space code provide a "__rseq_table" section
so debuggers can eventually figure out that they need to skip over the
rseq critical sections. However, it won't help the fact that pre-existing
debugger single-stepping will start turning perfectly working programs
into never-ending loops simply by having glibc use rseq for memory
allocation.

Using the cpu_opv system call on rseq failure solves this problem
entirely.

I would even go further and recommend to take a similar approach when
lack of progress is detected in a vDSO, and invoke the equivalent
system call. The current implementation of the clock_gettime()
vDSO turns instruction-level single-stepping into never
ending loops, which is far from being elegant.

Thanks,

Mathieu

--
Mathieu Desnoyers
EfficiOS Inc.
http://www.efficios.com

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2017-11-20 23:45    [W:0.090 / U:12.488 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site