lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2016]   [May]   [4]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [RFC PATCH] livepatch: allow removal of a disabled patch
On Wed, May 04, 2016 at 01:58:47PM +0200, Miroslav Benes wrote:
> On Tue, 3 May 2016, Josh Poimboeuf wrote:
>
> > On Tue, May 03, 2016 at 09:39:48PM -0500, Josh Poimboeuf wrote:
> > > On Wed, May 04, 2016 at 12:31:12AM +0200, Jiri Kosina wrote:
> > > > On Tue, 3 May 2016, Josh Poimboeuf wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > > 1. Do we really need a completion? If I am not missing something
> > > > > > kobject_del() always waits for sysfs callers to leave thanks to kernfs
> > > > > > active protection.
> > > > >
> > > > > What do you mean by "kernfs active protection"? I see that
> > > > > kernfs_remove() gets the kernfs_mutex lock, but I can't find anywhere
> > > > > that a write to a sysfs file uses that lock.
> > > > >
> > > > > I'm probably missing something...
> > > >
> > > > I don't want to speak on Miroslav's behalf, but I'm pretty sure that what
> > > > he has on mind is per-kernfs_node active refcounting kernfs does (see
> > > > kernfs_node->active, and especially it's usage in __kernfs_remove()).
> > > >
> > > > More specifically, execution of store() and show() sysfs callbacks is
> > > > guaranteed (by kernfs) to happen with that particular attribute's active
> > > > reference held for reading (and that makes it impossible for that
> > > > attribute to vanish prematurely).
> > >
> > > Thanks, that makes sense.
> > >
> > > So what exactly is the problem the completion is trying to solve? Is it
> > > to ensure that the kobject has been cleaned up before it returns to the
> > > caller, in case the user wants to call klp_register() again after
> > > unregistering?
> > >
> > > If so, that's quite an unusual use case which I think we should just
> > > consider unsupported. In fact, if you try to do it, kobject_init()
> > > complains loudly because kobj->state_initialized is still 1 because
> > > kobjects aren't meant to be reused like that.
> >
> > ... and now I realize the point is actually to prevent the caller from
> > freeing klp_patch before kobject_cleanup() runs.
>
> Exactly. Sorry I was so brief.
>
> > So yeah, it looks like we need the completion in case
> > CONFIG_DEBUG_KOBJECT_RELEASE is enabled.
> >
> > Or alternatively we could convert patch->kobj to be dynamically
> > allocated instead of embedded in klp_patch.
>
> But that wouldn't help, would it? Dynamic kobjects registers generic
> release function dynamic_kobj_release() and that's it. We're in the same
> situation. I have got a feeling that dynamic kobjects are only for trivial
> cases.

But the patch release doesn't need to do anything, right?

> Moreover we use container_of() several times in the code and that does not
> work with dynamically allocated kobjects.
>
> Anyway I am really confused now. When I read changelog of c817a67ecba7
> ("kobject: delayed kobject release: help find buggy drivers") all makes
> perfect sense. But isn't our situation somewhat special, because we have
> refcounts completely under control? So we know that once we call
> kobject_put() we can let a patch go... I must be missing something.
>
> It does not make sense to introduce completion just to satisfy a feature
> which was introduced to debug general cases.

I think our situation is "special" because klp_patch and its embedded
kobject have separate lifetimes. We have a kobject, which we own, which
is embedded in a klp_patch struct, which we don't own.

If I understand correctly, normally when you release a kobject, the
containing struct gets freed. But we can't do that here because the
caller allocated the klp_patch.

So I really get the feeling that a dynamic kobject would be more
appropriate here.

That said, the sysfs and kobject stuff always throws me for a loop. So
take what I'm saying with several grains of salt.

--
Josh

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2016-05-04 15:41    [W:0.169 / U:1.108 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site