lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2016]   [Apr]   [28]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [PATCHSET v5] Make background writeback great again for the first time
From
Date
On 04/28/2016 05:54 AM, Jan Kara wrote:
> On Wed 27-04-16 14:59:15, Jens Axboe wrote:
>> On Wed, Apr 27 2016, Jens Axboe wrote:
>>> On Wed, Apr 27 2016, Jens Axboe wrote:
>>>> On 04/27/2016 12:01 PM, Jan Kara wrote:
>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>
>>>>> On Tue 26-04-16 09:55:23, Jens Axboe wrote:
>>>>>> Since the dawn of time, our background buffered writeback has sucked.
>>>>>> When we do background buffered writeback, it should have little impact
>>>>>> on foreground activity. That's the definition of background activity...
>>>>>> But for as long as I can remember, heavy buffered writers have not
>>>>>> behaved like that. For instance, if I do something like this:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> $ dd if=/dev/zero of=foo bs=1M count=10k
>>>>>>
>>>>>> on my laptop, and then try and start chrome, it basically won't start
>>>>>> before the buffered writeback is done. Or, for server oriented
>>>>>> workloads, where installation of a big RPM (or similar) adversely
>>>>>> impacts database reads or sync writes. When that happens, I get people
>>>>>> yelling at me.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I have posted plenty of results previously, I'll keep it shorter
>>>>>> this time. Here's a run on my laptop, using read-to-pipe-async for
>>>>>> reading a 5g file, and rewriting it. You can find this test program
>>>>>> in the fio git repo.
>>>>>
>>>>> I have tested your patchset on my test system. Generally I have observed
>>>>> noticeable drop in average throughput for heavy background writes without
>>>>> any other disk activity and also somewhat increased variance in the
>>>>> runtimes. It is most visible on this simple testcases:
>>>>>
>>>>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/file bs=1M count=10000
>>>>>
>>>>> and
>>>>>
>>>>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/file bs=1M count=10000 conv=fsync
>>>>>
>>>>> The machine has 4GB of ram, /mnt is an ext3 filesystem that is freshly
>>>>> created before each dd run on a dedicated disk.
>>>>>
>>>>> Without your patches I get pretty stable dd runtimes for both cases:
>>>>>
>>>>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/file bs=1M count=10000
>>>>> Runtimes: 87.9611 87.3279 87.2554
>>>>>
>>>>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/file bs=1M count=10000 conv=fsync
>>>>> Runtimes: 93.3502 93.2086 93.541
>>>>>
>>>>> With your patches the numbers look like:
>>>>>
>>>>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/file bs=1M count=10000
>>>>> Runtimes: 108.183, 97.184, 99.9587
>>>>>
>>>>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/file bs=1M count=10000 conv=fsync
>>>>> Runtimes: 104.9, 102.775, 102.892
>>>>>
>>>>> I have checked whether the variance is due to some interaction with CFQ
>>>>> which is used for the disk. When I switched the disk to deadline, I still
>>>>> get some variance although, the throughput is still ~10% lower:
>>>>>
>>>>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/file bs=1M count=10000
>>>>> Runtimes: 100.417 100.643 100.866
>>>>>
>>>>> dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/file bs=1M count=10000 conv=fsync
>>>>> Runtimes: 104.208 106.341 105.483
>>>>>
>>>>> The disk is rotational SATA drive with writeback cache, queue depth of the
>>>>> disk reported in /sys/block/sdb/device/queue_depth is 1.
>>>>>
>>>>> So I think we still need some tweaking on the low end of the storage
>>>>> spectrum so that we don't lose 10% of throughput for simple cases like
>>>>> this.
>>>>
>>>> Thanks for testing, Jan! I haven't tried old QD=1 SATA. I wonder if
>>>> you are seeing smaller requests, and that is why it both varies and
>>>> you get lower throughput? I'll try and setup a test here similar to
>>>> yours.
>>>
>>> Jan, care to try the below patch? I can't fully reproduce your issue on
>>> a SCSI disk limited to QD=1, but I have a feeling this might help. It's
>>> a bit of a hack, but the general idea is to allow one more request to
>>> build up for QD=1 devices. That eliminates wait time between one request
>>> finishing, and the next being submitted.
>>
>> That accidentally added a potentially stall, this one is both cleaner
>> and should have that fixed.
>>
> ..
>> - rwb->wb_max = 1 + ((depth - 1) >> min(31U, rwb->scale_step));
>> - rwb->wb_normal = (rwb->wb_max + 1) / 2;
>> - rwb->wb_background = (rwb->wb_max + 3) / 4;
>> + if (rwb->queue_depth == 1) {
>> + rwb->wb_max = rwb->wb_normal = 2;
>> + rwb->wb_background = 1;
>
> This breaks the detection of too big scale_step in scale_up() where we key
> of wb_max == 1 value. However even with that fixed no luck :(:

Yeah, I need to look at that. For QD=1, I think the only sensible values
for max/normal/bg is 2/2/1 and 1/1/1 if we step down.

> dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/file bs=1M count=10000 conv=fsync
> Runtime: 105.126 107.125 105.641
>
> So about the same as before. I'll try to debug this later today...

Thanks, I'm very interested in what you find!

--
Jens Axboe

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2016-04-28 21:01    [W:0.106 / U:0.680 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site