lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2016]   [Mar]   [8]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH V2] acpi, pci, irq: account for early penalty assignment
On Tue, Mar 08, 2016 at 09:22:13AM +0100, Thomas Gleixner wrote:
> On Mon, 7 Mar 2016, Bjorn Helgaas wrote:
> > On Mon, Mar 07, 2016 at 11:55:43AM -0500, Sinan Kaya wrote:
> > > It makes sense for SCI as it is Intel specific.
> > >
> > > Unfortunately, this cannot be done in an arch independent way. Of course,
> > > ARM had to implement its own thing. While level-triggered, active-low is
> > > good for intel world, it is not for the ARM world. ARM uses active-high
> > > level triggered.
> >
> > I'm confused. I don't think SCI is Intel-specific. Per PCI Spec
> > r3.0, sec 2.2.6, PCI interrupts are level-sensitive, asserted low.
> > Per ACPI Spec v3.0, sec 2.1, the SCI is an "active, low, shareable,
> > level interrupt".
> >
> > Are you saying SCI is active-high on ARM? If so, I don't think that's
> > necessarily a huge problem, although we'd have to audit the ACPI code
> > to make sure we handle it correctly.
> >
> > The point here is that a PCI Interrupt Link can only use an IRQ that
> > is level-triggered, active low. If an IRQ is already set to any other
> > state, whether for an ISA device or for an active-high SCI, we can't
> > use it for a PCI Interrupt Link.
> >
> > It'd be nice if there were a generic way we could figure out what the
> > trigger mode of an IRQ is. I was hoping can_request_irq() was that
> > way, but I don't think it is, because it only looks at IRQF_SHARED,
> > not at IRQF_TRIGGER_LOW.
> >
> > Maybe irq_get_trigger_type() is what we want?
>
> Yes, that gives you the trigger typ, if the interrupt is already set up.
>
> > static int pci_compatible_trigger(int irq)
> > {
> > int type = irq_get_trigger_type(irq);
> >
> > return (type == IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_LOW || type == IRQ_TYPE_NONE);
> > }
> >
> > static unsigned int acpi_irq_get_penalty(int irq)
> > {
> > unsigned int penalty = 0;
> >
> > if (irq == acpi_gbl_FADT.sci_interrupt)
> > penalty += PIRQ_PENALTY_PCI_USING;
> >
> > penalty += acpi_irq_pci_sharing_penalty(irq);
> > return penalty;
> > }
> >
> > static int acpi_pci_link_allocate(struct acpi_pci_link *link)
> > {
> > unsigned int best = ~0;
> > ...
> >
> > for (i = (link->irq.possible_count - 1); i >= 0; i--) {
> > candidate = link->irq.possible[i];
> > if (!pci_compatible_trigger(candidate))
> > continue;
> >
> > penalty = acpi_irq_get_penalty(candidate);
> > if (penalty < best) {
> > irq = candidate;
> > best = penalty;
> > }
> > }
> > ...
> > }
> >
> > This looks racy, because we test irq_get_trigger_type() without any
> > kind of locking, and later acpi_register_gsi() calls
> > irq_create_fwspec_mapping(), which looks like it sets the new trigger
> > type. But I don't know how to fix that.
>
> Right, if that pci link allocation code can be executed concurrent, then you
> might end up with problem, but isn't that a problem even without
> irq_get_trigger_type()?

Yes. It's not a new problem, I just noticed it since we're thinking
more about the details of what's happening here.

Bjorn

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2016-03-08 19:21    [W:0.090 / U:4.332 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site