lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2015]   [Jun]   [9]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [PATCH -rfc 4/4] locking/rtmutex: Support spin on owner (osq)
From
Date
On Fri, 2015-06-05 at 15:59 +0200, Thomas Gleixner wrote:
> On Tue, 19 May 2015, Davidlohr Bueso wrote:
> >
> > +/*
> > + * Lockless alternative to rt_mutex_has_waiters() as we do not need the
> > + * wait_lock to check if we are in, for instance, a transitional state
> > + * after calling mark_rt_mutex_waiters().
>
> Before I get into a state of brain melt, could you please explain that
> in an understandable way?

With that I meant that we could check the owner to see if the
RT_MUTEX_HAS_WAITERS bit was set without taking the wait_lock and no
owner.

>
> rt_mutex_has_waiters() looks at the root pointer of the rbtree head
> whether that's empty. You can do a lockless check of that as well,
> right? So what's the FAST part of that function and how is that
> related to a point after we called mark_rt_mutex_waiters()?

You're right, we could use rt_mutex_has_waiters(). When I thought of
this originally, I was considering something like:

if (rt_mutex_has_waiters(lock)) {
if (current->prio >= rt_mutex_top_waiter(lock)->prio)
...

Which obviously requires the wait_lock, but I did not consider just
using the tree. However, the consequence I see in doing this is that we
would miss scenarios where mark_rt_mutex_waiters() is called (under nil
owner, for example), so we would force tasks to block only when there
are truly waiters.

> > + */
> > +static inline bool rt_mutex_has_waiters_fast(struct rt_mutex *lock)
> > +{
> > + unsigned long val = (unsigned long)lock->owner;
> > +
> > + if (!val)
> > + return false;
> > + return val & RT_MUTEX_HAS_WAITERS;
> > +}
> > +
>
> > +/*
> > + * Initial check for entering the mutex spinning loop
> > + */
> > +static inline bool rt_mutex_can_spin_on_owner(struct rt_mutex *lock)
> > +{
> > + struct task_struct *owner;
> > + /* default return to spin: if no owner, the lock is free */
>
>
> Rather than having a comment in the middle of the variable declaration
> section, I'd prefer a comment explaing the whole logic of this
> function.

Ok.

> > + int ret = true;
>
> > +static bool rt_mutex_optimistic_spin(struct rt_mutex *lock)
> > +{
> > + bool taken = false;
> > +
> > + preempt_disable();
> > +
> > + if (!rt_mutex_can_spin_on_owner(lock))
> > + goto done;
> > + /*
> > + * In order to avoid a stampede of mutex spinners trying to
> > + * acquire the mutex all at once, the spinners need to take a
> > + * MCS (queued) lock first before spinning on the owner field.
> > + */
> > + if (!osq_lock(&lock->osq))
> > + goto done;
>
> Hmm. The queue lock is serializing potential spinners, right?

Yes.

>
> So that's going to lead to a potential priority ordering problem
> because if a lower prio task wins the racing to the ocq_lock queue,
> then the higher prio waiter will be queued behind and blocked from
> taking the lock first.

Hmm yes, ocq is a fair lock. However I believe this is mitigated by (a)
the conservative spinning approach, and (b) by osq_lock's need_resched()
check, so at least a spinner will abort if a higher prio task comes in.
But of course, this only deals with spinners, and we cannot account for
a lower prio owner task.

So if this is not acceptable, I guess we'll have to do without the mcs
like properties.

Thanks,
Davidlohr




\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2015-06-09 07:21    [W:0.124 / U:17.668 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site