lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2015]   [Apr]   [17]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: 4.0 kernel XFS filesystem crash when running AIM7's disk workload
On Fri, Apr 17, 2015 at 01:38:49PM -0400, Waiman Long wrote:
> Hi Dave,
>
> When I was running the AIM7's disk workload on a 8-socket
> Westmere-EX server with 4.0 kernel, the kernel crash. A set of small
> ramdisks were created (ramdisk_size=271072). Those ramdisks were
> formatted with XFS filesystem before the test began. The kernel log
> was:
>
> XFS (ram12): Mounting V4 Filesystem
> XFS (ram12): Log size 1424 blocks too small, minimum size is 1596 blocks
> XFS (ram12): Log size out of supported range. Continuing onwards,
> but if log hangs are
> experienced then please report this message in the bug report.

First thing you need to do is upgrade xfsprogs so that this message
goes away. or use "mkfs.xfs -l size=10m" so that the log is larger
than the minimum.

> XFS (ram15): Ending clean mount
> BUG: unable to handle kernel NULL pointer dereference at (null)
> IP: [<ffffffff812abd6d>] __memcpy+0xd/0x110
> PGD 29f7655f067 PUD 29f75a80067 PMD 0
> Oops: 0000 [#1] SMP
> Modules linked in: xfs exportfs libcrc32c ebtable_nat ebtables
> xt_CHECKSUM iptable_mangle bridge stp llc autofs4 ipt_REJECT
> nf_reject_ipv4 nf_conntrack_ipv4 nf_defrag_ipv4 iptable_filter
> ip_tables ip6t_REJECT nf_reject_ipv6 nf_conntrack_ipv6
> nf_defrag_ipv6 xt_state nf_conntrack ip6table_filter ip6_tables ipv6
> vhost_net macvtap macvlan vhost tun kvm_intel kvm ipmi_si
> ipmi_msghandler tpm_infineon iTCO_wdt iTCO_vendor_support wmi
> acpi_cpufreq microcode pcspkr serio_raw qlcnic be2net vxlan
> udp_tunnel ip6_udp_tunnel ses enclosure igb dca ptp pps_core lpc_ich
> mfd_core hpilo hpwdt sg i7core_edac edac_core netxen_nic ext4(E)
> jbd2(E) mbcache(E) sr_mod(E) cdrom(E) sd_mod(E) lpfc(E) qla2xxx(E)
> scsi_transport_fc(E) pata_acpi(E) ata_generic(E) ata_piix(E) hpsa(E)
> radeon(E) ttm(E) drm_kms_helper(E) drm(E) i2c_algo_bit(E)
> i2c_core(E) dm_mirror(E) dm_region_hash(E) dm_log(E) dm_mod(E)

Why do you have a mix of signed and unsigned modules loaded?

> CPU: 69 PID: 116603 Comm: xfsaild/ram5 Tainted: G E 4.0.0 #2
> Hardware name: HP ProLiant DL980 G7, BIOS P66 07/30/2012
> task: ffff8b9f7eeb4f80 ti: ffff8b9f7f1ac000 task.ti: ffff8b9f7f1ac000
> RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff812abd6d>] [<ffffffff812abd6d>] __memcpy+0xd/0x110
> RSP: 0018:ffff8b9f7f1afc10 EFLAGS: 00010206
> RAX: ffff88102476a3cc RBX: ffff889ff2ab5000 RCX: 0000000000000005
> RDX: 0000000000000006 RSI: 0000000000000000 RDI: ffff88102476a3cc

edx = 6 bytes.

> RBP: ffff8b9f7f1afc18 R08: 0000000000000001 R09: ffff88102476a3cc
> R10: ffff8a1f6c03ea80 R11: 0000000000000000 R12: ffff8b1ff1269400
> R13: ffff8b1f64837c98 R14: ffff881038701200 R15: ffff88102476a300
> FS: 0000000000000000(0000) GS:ffff8b1fffa40000(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000
> CS: 0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 000000008005003b
> CR2: 0000000000000000 CR3: 0000029f7655e000 CR4: 00000000000006e0
> Stack:
> ffffffffa0ca8c41 ffff8b9f7f1afc68 ffffffffa0cc4803 ffff8b9f7f1afc68
> ffffffffa0cd2777 ffff8b9f7f1afc68 ffff8b1ff1269400 ffff8a9f59022800
> ffff8b1f7c932718 0000000000000003 ffff8a9f590228e4 ffff8b9f7f1afce8
> Call Trace:
> [<ffffffffa0ca8c41>] ? xfs_iflush_fork+0x181/0x240 [xfs]
> [<ffffffffa0cc4803>] xfs_iflush_int+0x1f3/0x320 [xfs]
> [<ffffffffa0cd2777>] ? kmem_alloc+0x87/0x100 [xfs]
> [<ffffffffa0cc60a5>] xfs_iflush_cluster+0x295/0x380 [xfs]
> [<ffffffffa0cc8ff4>] xfs_iflush+0xf4/0x1f0 [xfs]
> [<ffffffffa0cda22a>] xfs_inode_item_push+0xea/0x130 [xfs]
> [<ffffffffa0ce140d>] xfsaild_push+0x10d/0x500 [xfs]
> [<ffffffff810b7c20>] ? lock_timer_base+0x70/0x70
> [<ffffffffa0ce1898>] xfsaild+0x98/0x130 [xfs]
> [<ffffffffa0ce1800>] ? xfsaild_push+0x500/0x500 [xfs]
> [<ffffffffa0ce1800>] ? xfsaild_push+0x500/0x500 [xfs]
> [<ffffffffa0ce1800>] ? xfsaild_push+0x500/0x500 [xfs]
> [<ffffffff81074b50>] ? kthread_freezable_should_stop+0x70/0x70
> [<ffffffff815c5748>] ret_from_fork+0x58/0x90
> [<ffffffff81074b50>] ? kthread_freezable_should_stop+0x70/0x70
> Code: 0f b6 c0 5b c9 c3 0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00 00 e8 2b f9 ff ff 80 7b
> 25 00 74 c8 eb d3 90 90 90 48 89 f8 48 89 d1 48 c1 e9 03 83 e2 07
> <f3> 48 a5 89 d1 f3 a4 c3 20 4c 8b 06 4c 8b 4e 08 4c 8b 56 10 4c
> RIP [<ffffffff812abd6d>] __memcpy+0xd/0x110
> RSP <ffff8b9f7f1afc10>
> CR2: 0000000000000000
> ---[ end trace fb8a4add69562a76 ]---
>
> The xfs_iflush_fork+0x181/0x240 (385) IP address is at:
>

(rearrange slightly to make more sense)

> 823 case XFS_DINODE_FMT_LOCAL:
> 824 if ((iip->ili_fields & dataflag[whichfork]) &&
> 0x00000000000023c0 <+336>: movslq %ecx,%rcx
> 0x00000000000023c3 <+339>: movswl 0x0(%rcx,%rcx,1),%eax
> 0x00000000000023cb <+347>: test %eax,0x90(%rdx)
> 0x00000000000023d1 <+353>: je 0x2350 <xfs_iflush_fork+224>
>
> 825 (ifp->if_bytes > 0)) {
> 0x00000000000023d7 <+359>: mov (%r10),%edx
> 0x00000000000023da <+362>: test %edx,%edx
> 0x00000000000023dc <+364>: jle 0x2350 <xfs_iflush_fork+224>

So the contents of rdx says that the inode fork size is 6 bytes in
local format. The call location also indicates that it is the
attribute fork that is in being flushed. The minimum size of the
attr fork is 3 bytes - an empty header. However, then ext valid size
has a second header that adds 4 bytes to the size, plus the bytes
inteh attr name and value.

Hence a size of 6 bytes is invalid, and probably indicates that
there is some form of memory corruption going on here.

IIRC, we haven't touched this code for a while - can you test 3.19
and see if it has the same problem? If it doesn't have the problem,
and given you can reliably reproduce the crash, can you run a
bisect to find the cause?

FWIW, there's been a few dentry cache related crashes reported late
in the 4.0-rc series that point to memory corruption as the cause of
the panics, so I'm wondering if this is another symptom of the same
problem....

Cheers,

Dave.
--
Dave Chinner
david@fromorbit.com


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2015-04-18 02:01    [W:0.116 / U:1.928 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site