lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2015]   [Mar]   [8]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: [x86/asm/entry] BUG: unable to handle kernel paging request
On Sun, Mar 8, 2015 at 12:13 PM, Denys Vlasenko
<vda.linux@googlemail.com> wrote:
> On Sat, Mar 7, 2015 at 1:33 AM, Andy Lutomirski <luto@amacapital.net> wrote:
>> On Fri, Mar 6, 2015 at 3:30 PM, Fengguang Wu <fengguang.wu@intel.com> wrote:
>>> Greetings,
>>>
>>> 0day kernel testing robot got the below dmesg and the first bad commit is
>>>
>>> git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tip/tip.git x86/asm
>>>
>>> commit 75182b1632a89f12540baa1806a7c5c180db620c
>>> Author: Andy Lutomirski <luto@amacapital.net>
>>> AuthorDate: Thu Mar 5 19:19:03 2015 -0800
>>> Commit: Ingo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
>>> CommitDate: Fri Mar 6 08:32:57 2015 +0100
>>>
>>> x86/asm/entry: Switch all C consumers of kernel_stack to this_cpu_sp0()
>>
>> This problem only happens on 32-bit kernels, and the culprit is, sort of:
>>
>> /*
>> * The below -8 is to reserve 8 bytes on top of the ring0 stack.
>> * This is necessary to guarantee that the entire "struct pt_regs"
>> * is accessible even if the CPU haven't stored the SS/ESP registers
>> * on the stack (interrupt gate does not save these registers
>> * when switching to the same priv ring).
>> * Therefore beware: accessing the ss/esp fields of the
>> * "struct pt_regs" is possible, but they may contain the
>> * completely wrong values.
>> */
>> #define task_pt_regs(task) \
>> ({ \
>> struct pt_regs *__regs__; \
>> __regs__ = (struct pt_regs *)(KSTK_TOP(task_stack_page(task))-8); \
>> __regs__ - 1; \
>> })
>>
>> I'm confused about multiple things:
>>
>> 1. I don't understand this comment.
>
> Comment says that in 32-bit x86, interrupts and exceptions
> in ring 0 do not push SS,ESP - they only save EFLAGS,CS,EIP
> in iret frame. (This happens because CPL doesn't
> change, not beacuse ot is zero).
>
> IRET insn likewise does not restore SS,ESP if it detects
> that RPL(stack_CS) = RPL(CS).
>
> This was changed for 64-bit more for two reasons:
> (1) it's simpler, and
> (2) it makes it possible for CPU to automatically align stack
> to 16-byte boundary (you need to undo that on iretq,
> therefore you need to always save old RSP).
>
> From AMD docs:
>
> "8.9.3 Interrupt Stack Frame
> In long mode, the return-program stack pointer (SS:RSP) is always
> pushed onto the interrupt-handler
> stack, regardless of whether or not a privilege change occurs.
> Although the SS register is not used in
> 64-bit mode, SS is pushed to allow returns into compatibility mode.
> Pushing SS:RSP unconditionally
> presents operating systems with a consistent interrupt-stack-frame
> size for all interrupts, except for
> error codes. Interrupt service-routine entry points that handle
> interrupts generated by non-error-code
> interrupts can push an error code on the stack for consistency.
> In long mode, when a control transfer to an interrupt handler occurs,
> the processor performs the
> following:
> 1. Aligns the new interrupt-stack frame by masking RSP with
> FFFF_FFFF_FFFF_FFF0h.
> ..."
>
>> 2. copy_thread thinks that sp0 should be task_pt_regs + 1, which is 8
>> bytes below the top of the stack. cpu_tss, formerly INIT_TSS, thinks
>> that sp0 should be the top of the stack. This is inconsistent. What
>> gives?
>
> I ran a small test: made "umask" syscall print where pt_regs is,
> and where it's end is:
>
> SYSCALL_DEFINE1(umask, int, mask)
> {
> struct pt_regs *regs = task_pt_regs(current);
> unsigned long ptregs = (unsigned long)regs;
>
> pr_err("[%d] current:%lx pt_regs:%lx pt_regs_end:%lx\n",
> current->pid, (long)current, ptregs, ptregs + sizeof(*regs));
> ....
>
> Result:
>
> / # umask
> [ 8.393450] [910] current:c777ce00 pt_regs:c7567fb4 pt_regs_end:c7567ff8
> [ 8.396601] [910] current:c777ce00 pt_regs:c7567fb4 pt_regs_end:c7567ff8
>
> It seems to be true that 32-bit x86 always has two unused words
> beyond "struct pt_regs" on stack during syscalls.
>
> IOW: tss.sp0 is *not* set at the very end of the stack on 32-bit.

So maybe the idea is that, if we end up using sp0 for an entry *from*
ring 0, then the struct pt_regs won't dangle off the top of the stack.
But this still doesn't make sense to me: if we enter from ring 0, then
the CPU won't look at sp0 in the first place.

Linus, if you're paying attention here, I suspect that you wrote this
code. Do you remember what the point is?

>
>> 3. vm86 does something terrible to sp0, which might mean that we can't
>> use sp0 to find the top of the stack in general on 32-bit kernels,
>> which is sad. We might need a partial revert or to introduce a
>> per-cpu variable "real_sp0" on 32-bit. Ugh. Could someone who
>> understands vm86 mode better than me give me a hint?
>>
>> 4. Not directly related, but the 32-bit tss_struct contains this gem:
>>
>> /*
>> * .. and then another 0x100 bytes for the emergency kernel stack:
>> */
>> unsigned long stack[64];
>>
>> Last I checked, 0x100 != 64. Also, wow, this is kind of disgusting. :)
>
>
> Seems to be unused: I commented it out on "defconfig" build
> and got no build errors.

It's used. On 32-bit, NMIs don't use task gates (I don't know why),
so sysenter is set up to set rsp to point to that "stack". If an NMI
happens before we fix rsp, then we'll use this stack temporarily.

--Andy


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2015-03-08 21:01    [W:0.143 / U:0.264 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site