lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2015]   [Feb]   [16]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH RFC 01/12] Documentation: Introduce Linux Kernel Thermal Framework DocBook
On Tue, Feb 10, 2015 at 02:50:36PM -0800, Randy Dunlap wrote:
> On 02/09/15 13:34, Eduardo Valentin wrote:
>
> > + <chapter id="introduction">
> > + <title>Introduction</title>
> > + <para>Thermal management is any method or technique implied to
> > + mitigate emergencies caused by operating devices within
> > + unsupported temperatures. The challenge consists of designing a
>
> I would flip the ending of that sentence:
> caused by operating devices outside of
> supported temperatures.
>
> > + product keeping the junction temperature of the IC components.
> > + The operating temperature of IC components used on products must
> > + operate within their design limits. Besides, temperature towards
> > + device enclosure must be in a comfort level for the user.
> > + Therefore, thermal management, by the time of this writing,
> > + starts in very early device design phase. Managing thermal may
> > + involve different disciplines, at different stages, such as
> > + temperature monitoring, floorplanning, microarchitectural
> > + techniques, compiler techniques, OS techniques, liquid cooling,
> > + and thermal reliability or security. This document covers what
> > + the Linux Kernel Thermal Framework provides as abstraction to
> > + users with respect to thermal management.
> > + </para>
> > + <para>One of the first proposals to provide a solution to cover
> > + the thermal problem appears in the Advanced Configuration and
> > + Power Interface (ACPI) specification. ACPI provides an open
> > + standard for device configuration and power management by the
> > + operating system. However, several computing devices which may
> > + have thermal issues in the market disregard the ACPI standard.
> > + Therefore, the Linux Kernel Thermal Framework has been designed
> > + to serve as abstraction for ACPI and non-ACPI systems. The core
> > + concepts applies in both types of systems.
> > + </para>
> > + <para>The Linux Kernel Thermal Framework has a design which
> > + represents the different thermal constraints found in an
>
> drop: an^^
>
> > + end-products. The thermal constraints exist to serve different
> > + purposes. There two major types of thermal constraints. The
>
> There are two
>
> > + first is related to components junction temperature. The second
> > + is related to the level of comfort while end users are handling
> > + devices.
> > + </para>
> > +
> > + </chapter>
> > +</book>
> >
>
>
> --
> ~Randy

Thanks Randy for checking this up. I apologize for forgetting Ccing you
in my original post. I will fix the text as per your suggestions and
also copy you in next version.

Thanks for you time.

Eduardo Valentin

[unhandled content-type:application/pgp-signature]
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2015-02-16 21:21    [W:0.046 / U:1.644 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site