lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2015]   [Dec]   [15]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH] ftrace: fix race between ftrace and insmod
On 2015/12/16 1:37, Steven Rostedt wrote:
> On Tue, 15 Dec 2015 11:26:41 +0800
> "Zhang, Yanmin" <yanmin_zhang@linux.intel.com> wrote:
>
>>> This seems very hackish, although I can't think of a better way at the
>>> moment. But I would like not to add more code into module.c if
>>> possible, and just use a notifier unless there's a real reason we can't
>>> (as there was when we added the hook in the first place).
>>> We would double-check it again. It's not a good idea to change common
>>> module codes.
>> I double-checked it. If using notifier, we have to add 2 new module notification
>> events in enum module_state.
>> For example, MODULE_STATE_INITING, MODULE_STATE_INITING_FAILED.
>> At MODULE_STATE_INITING, call ftrace_module_init(mod);
>> At MODULE_STATE_INITING_FAILED, call ftrace_release_mod (or similar function);
>> At MODULE_STATE_COMING, call a new function which links the new start_pg
>> to ftrace_pages.
>> Such design can also fix another bug in current kernel that ftrace start_pg
>> of the module is not cleaned up if complete_formation fails.
>> However, we change module common codes. The new events only serve ftrace.
>>
>> If not holding ftrace_mutex across start_pg setup and complete_formation,
>> some other variables are not protected well, such like ftrace_pages,
>> ftrace_start_up, and so on.
> OK, that was basically the reason the hook was added in the first place.
>
> The reason the modules notifier doesn't work here is that there's too
> many exits from the module code that may leave the mutex held.

Yes.

>
> I thought about this some more. So the issue is that we add the module
> functions to the ftrace records. Then another task enables function
> tracing before the module is fully set up. As ftrace is enabling
> function tracing, the module sets its text to read-only, outside the
> scope of ftrace setting all text to read-write. When ftrace gets to the
> module code, it fails to do the modifications and you get the
> ftrace_bug() splat.
>
> Sounds right?

Right, indeed.
My case is worse than that as my android uses kernel 3.14.50, which has another
bug around remove_breakpoint as it calls probe_kernel_write directly. The
latest upstream has no such issue. So we just need focus on the race you
explain well.

>
> Now, I really dislike the taking of the ftrace mutex and returning back
> to module handling. That is very subtle, fragile and prone to bugs.

Yes, just like that the current codes are not perfect. :)

> I
> took a step back to find another solution and I think I found one.
>
> Take the below patch and add to it (I'll keep this patch as mine, and
> you can submit another patch to do the following). You don't need to
> resend this patch, just send me a patch that does this:

Ok.

>
>
> Add the module notifier that calls ftrace_module_enable(mod), removing
> it from ftrace_init_module(). Feel free to monkey with that function to
> be able to be called directly if it can't already.
>
> What my patch does is to create a new ftrace record flag DISABLED,
> which is set to all functions in a module as it is added. Then later on
> (in the module notifier that you will add), the flag is cleared. In
> between, the module functions will be ignored.

It's a good idea.


>
> If the module errors out and the notifier is not called, we don't care.
> The records will simply be removed, and the flag will be meaningless.

One question: if complete_formation fails, load_module
wouldn't send any notification and ftrace_release_mod is not called.
How can ftrace core remove all pg->records of the module?

If complete_formation succeeds, further calls cause module errors out,
load_module would send MODULE_STATE_GOING, ftrace_release_mod is called.

Thanks for your quick response.

Yanmin



\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2015-12-16 02:21    [W:0.059 / U:0.044 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site