lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2014]   [Apr]   [8]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 2/2] ARM: mm: make text and rodata read-only
On Tue, Apr 08, 2014 at 09:59:07AM -0700, Kees Cook wrote:
> On Tue, Apr 8, 2014 at 9:12 AM, Jon Medhurst (Tixy) <tixy@linaro.org> wrote:
> > And is the page table being modified unique to the current CPU? I
> > thought a common set of page tables was shared across all of them. If
> > that is the case then one CPU can modify the PTE to be writeable,
> > another CPU take a TLB miss and pull in that writeable entry, which will
> > stay there until it drops out the TLB at some indefinite point in the
> > future. That's the scenario I was getting at with my previous comment.
>
> As I understood it, this would be true for small PTEs, but sections
> are fully duplicated on each CPU so we don't run that risk. This was
> the whole source of my problem with this patch series: even a full
> all-CPU TLB flush wasn't working -- the section permissions were
> unique to the CPU since the entries were duplicated.

The PGD is per-mm_struct. mm_structs can be shared between processes.
So the PGD is not per CPU.

This set_kernel_text_rw() is called from ftrace in stop_machine() on one
CPU. All other CPUs will be spinning in kernel threads inside the loop
in multi_cpu_stop(), with interrupts disabled. Since kernel threads use
the last process' mm, it is possible for the other CPU(s) to be
currently using the same mm as the modifying CPU.

For any other CPU to pull in the writable entry it would have to get a
TLB miss inside the loop in multi_cpu_stop(), after the state transition
to MULTI_STOP_RUN and before the state transition to MULTI_STOP_EXIT.
This is unlikely, but theoretically possible, for example if
multi_cpu_stop() straddles sections.

To prevent any stale entries being used indefinitely, perhaps the all
CPU TLB flush can be inserted into
ftrace_arch_code_modify_post_process(), which is called after the
stop_machine() and which is where x86 for example makes the entries
read-only again.


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2014-04-08 22:21    [W:0.080 / U:4.804 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site