lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2014]   [Apr]   [8]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: ext4 performance falloff
On Mon, Apr 07, 2014 at 09:40:28AM -0700, Andi Kleen wrote:
> Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz> writes:
> >
> > What we really need is a counter where we can better estimate counts
> > accumulated in the percpu part of it. As the counter approaches zero, it's
> > CPU overhead will have to become that of a single locked variable but when
> > the value of counter is relatively high, we want it to be fast as the
> > percpu one. Possibly, each CPU could "reserve" part of the value in the
> > counter (by just decrementing the total value; how large that part should
> > be really needs to depend to the total value of the counter and number of
> > CPUs - in this regard we really differ from classical percpu couters) and
> > allocate/free using that part. If CPU cannot reserve what it is asked for
> > anymore, it would go and steal from parts other CPUs have accumulated,
> > returning them to global pool until it can satisfy the allocation.

Yup, that's pretty much what the slow path/fast path breakdown of
the xfs_icsb_* (XFS In-Core Super Block) code in fs/xfs/xfs_mount.c
does. :)

It distributes free space across all the CPUs and
rebalances them when a per-CPu counter runs out. And to avoid lots
of rebalances when ENOSPC approaches (512 blocks per CPU, IIRC),
it disables the per-CPU counters completely and falls back to a
global counter protected by a mutex to avoid wasting hundreds of
CPUs spinning on a contended global lock. When the free space goes
back above that threshold, it returns to per-cpu mode (the fast
path code).

> That's a percpu_counter() isn't it? (or cookie jar)

No. percpu_counters do not guarantee accuracy nor can the counters
be externally serialised for things like concurrent ENOSPC detection
that require a guarantee that the counter never, ever goes below
zero.

> The MM uses similar techniques.

I haven't seen anything else that uses similar techniques to the XFS
code - I wrote it back in 2005 before there was generic per-cpu
counter infrastructure, and I've been keeping an eye out as
to whether it could be replaced with generic code ever since....

Cheers,

Dave.
--
Dave Chinner
david@fromorbit.com


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2014-04-08 13:01    [W:0.066 / U:12.448 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site