lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2013]   [Sep]   [23]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
SubjectRe: checkpatch guide for newbies
From
On Mon, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:01 AM, Dan Carpenter
<dan.carpenter@oracle.com> wrote:
> I've written a checkpatch guide for newbies because it seems like they
> make the same mistakes over and over. I intend to put it under
> Documentation/. Could you look it over?
>
>
> Introduction
>
> This document is aimed at new kernel contributors using "checkpatch.pl --file".
>
> The first thing to remember is that the aim is not to get rid of every
> checkpatch.pl warning; the aim is to make the code cleaner and more readable.
> The other thing to remember is that checkpatch.pl is not a very smart tool and
> there are mistakes that it misses so keep your eyes open for those as well.
>
> For example, checkpatch.pl could warn about a badly formatted warning message.
> Ask yourself, is the warning message is clear? Is it needed? Could a
> non-privileged user trigger the warning and flood the syslog? Are there
> spelling mistakes? Since Checkpatch.pl has flagged the line as sloppy code,
> there may be multiple mistakes.
>
> In the Linux kernel, we take an enormous pride in our work and we want clean
> code. But the one major drawback to cleanup patches is that they break
> "git blame" so it's not a good idea for newbies to send very trivial cleanup
> patches to the kernel/ directory. It's better to get a little experience in the
> drivers/ directory first. The drivers/staging/ directory in particular always
> needs cleanup patches.
>
>
> General Hints
>
> 1) Don't put too many things in one patch because it makes it hard to review.
> Break the patch up into a patch series like this made up example:
>
> [PATCH 1/4] subsystem: driver: Use tabs to indent instead of spaces
> [PATCH 2/4] subsystem: driver: Add spaces around math operations
> [PATCH 3/4] subsystem: driver: Remove extra braces
> [PATCH 4/4] subsystem: driver: Delete LINUX_VERSION_CODE related code
>
>
> Long Lines
>
> Historically screens were 80 characters wide and it was annoying when code went
> over the edge. These days we have larger screens, but we keep the 80 character
> limit because it forces us to write simpler code.
>
> One way to remove indent levels is using functions. If you find yourself
> writing a loop or a switch statement and you're already indented several tabs
> then probably it should be a new function instead.
>
> Whenever possible return immediately.
> Bad:
> - foo = kmalloc();
> - if (foo) {
> - /* code indent 2 tabs */
> - }
> - return foo;
> Good:
> + foo = kmalloc();
> + if (!foo)
> + return NULL;
> + /* code indented 1 tab */
> + return foo;
>
> Choose shorter names.
> Bad:
> - for(uiIpv6AddIndex = 0; uiIpv6AddIndex < uiIpv6AddrNoLongWords;
> - uiIpv6AddIndex++) {
> Good:
> + for (i = 0; i < long_words; i++) {
>
> Use temporary variable names:
> Bad:
> - dev->backdev[count]->bitlistsize =
> - dev->backdev[count]->devmagic->bitlistsize;
> Good:
> + back = dev->backdev[count];
> + back->bitlistsize = back->devmagic->bitlistsize;
>
> Don't do complicated things in the initializer:
> Bad:
> - struct binder_ref_death *tmp_death = container_of(w,
> - struct binder_ref_death, work);
> Good:
> + struct binder_ref_death *tmp_death;
> +
> + tmp_death = container_of(w, struct binder_ref_death, work);
>
> If you must break up a long line then align it nicely. Use spaces if needed.
> Bad:
> - if (adapter->flowcontrol == FLOW_RXONLY ||
> - adapter->flowcontrol == FLOW_BOTH) {
> Good:
> + if (adapter->flowcontrol == FLOW_RXONLY ||
> + adapter->flowcontrol == FLOW_BOTH) {

I needed this yesterday. I was not comfortable using spaces and I did
not know where the second line should begin.


>
> It's preferred if the operator goes at the end of the first line instead of at
> the start of the second line:
> Bad:
> - PowerData = (1 << 31) | (0 << 30) | (24 << 24)
> - | BitReverse(w89rf242_txvga_data[i][0], 24);
> Good:
> + PowerData = (1 << 31) | (0 << 30) | (24 << 24) |
> + BitReverse(w89rf242_txvga_data[i][0], 24);
What is the rule for where to start the second line here?


>
>
> Writing the Changelog
>
> Use the word "cleanup" instead of "fix". "Fix" implies the runtime changed and
> it fixes a bug. "Cleanup" implies that runtime stayed exactly the same.
>
>
>
> --
> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe kernel-janitors" in
> the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
> More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html



--
Peter


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2013-09-23 15:01    [W:0.135 / U:1.700 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site