lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2013]   [Jul]   [16]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [ 00/19] 3.10.1-stable review
From
Date
On Tue, 2013-07-16 at 16:30 +0200, Geert Uytterhoeven wrote:
> On Mon, Jul 15, 2013 at 10:41 PM, Sarah Sharp
> <sarah.a.sharp@linux.intel.com> wrote:
> > I should not have to ask for professional behavior on the mailing lists.
> > Professional behavior should be the default.
>
> So, what does "professional" mean? A professional is paid for his work, an
> amateur isn't. But this doesn't say anything about code quality, maintainer
> responsiveness, etc.
> Does it imply behavior that (hopefully) keeps getting you paid?
>

Let me give you an example of a "professional" environment. When I use
to work for a large corporation, we had one guy doing some work for us
and he was rather new to our department (not new as a programmer). But I
swear, I have no idea how he became a programmer, and he's been with the
company for a while. He had to do a task that I was in charge of, and
gave him the requirements. He just couldn't understand it. I spent a
full week and a half "being nice" and going into details of what he
needed to do and he got no where. Finally, as I have now gone over every
aspect of what needed to be done and knew it in excruciating detail, I
sat down and wrote the entire thing myself in a single day. This was
something he was to do in two weeks.

When my manager heard about this, she blew up and sent a very nasty
email to the employee's manager, and things got really bad because of
the "nastiness" of the email and not the fact that we wasted two weeks
of being unproductive.

That's what a professional environment gives you, and honestly, I think
the Linux community can do without it.

-- Steve




\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2013-07-16 17:43    [W:0.357 / U:9.636 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site