lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2012]   [Sep]   [13]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH RFC cgroup/for-3.7] cgroup: mark subsystems with broken hierarchy support and whine if cgroups are nested for them
Hello, Glauber.

On Thu, Sep 13, 2012 at 03:53:56PM +0400, Glauber Costa wrote:
> Here is where the Kconfig option comes to play. If we do it in the
> kernel, userspace doesn't have to do anything. I spoke with Lennart and
> Kay, and at least from a systemd PoV, they would much rather not provide
> a hack in userspace for a file that is scheduled to go away in any case
> - which I personally believe is a fair request.
>
> It is a default, so the effect for the user is the same: After the
> machine boots, use_hierarchy = 1, and he can still flip to 0 for some time.

Alright, let's go Kconfig. Let's just make sure that the transitional
nature is clearly labeled and the fact that the default config will
generate a warning when nested cgroups are created in memcg. We can
then coordinate the flip with distros. Can you please repost the
Kconfig patch?

> > Setting mark on a parent should be reflected on all its children w/o
> > their own explicit settings.
>
> That is clear, and better behavior than we have today. What I mean, is
> that by setting its own marking, the child can pretty much "escape" the
> group.
>
> The ideal solution - from this point of view only - would be to have
> more than one marking, and mark with all the way down to the root. So if
> you have an iptables rule to match one marking, it still applies to the
> kids. And you can still have extra markings.
>
> I am not sure this is feasible, though, in which case your solution
> could be a good compromise. But please let's aim for it.

I don't think it supports multiple tags. If that's possible, it would
be nice but I don't think it's a must.

Thanks.

--
tejun


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2012-09-13 20:41    [W:0.143 / U:0.080 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site