lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2012]   [Feb]   [6]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: Compat 32-bit syscall entry from 64-bit task!?
On 02/06/2012 12:32 AM, Indan Zupancic wrote:
>
> It seems that just using eflags is a lot simpler than the alternatives,
> let's just go for it.
>
>
> I propose using bits somewhere in the middle of the upper half. If new
> flags are ever added by Intel or AMD, they will use the lower bits. If
> anyone else ever adds flags, they most likely add them to the top (VIA).
> So the middle seems the safest spot as far as long-term maintenance goes.
>
> The below version does that, but instead of setting one of the two bits,
> it always sets bit 50 for newer kernels and sets bit 51 if it's a compat
> system call. I find this version more readable and after compilation it's
> also a couple of bytes smaller compared to Linus' original version.
>
> Should we make sure that the top 32 bits are zero, in case any weird
> hardware does set our bits?
>

[Adding H.J. Lu, since he has run into some of these requirements before]

NAK in the extreme.

We have not heard back from the architecture people on this, and I will
NAK this unless that happens.

Furthermore, you're picking bits that do not work for 32 bits, EVEN
THOUGH WE HAVE A SIMILAR PROBLEM ON 32 BITS; I outlined it for you and
you chose to ignore it.

Finally, I think we actually are going to need a fair number of bits in
the end. All of this points to using a new regset designed for
extension in the first place.

As far as I can tell, we need at least the following information:

- If the CPU is currently in 32- or 64-bit mode.
- If we are currently inside a system call, and if so if it was entered
via:
- SYSCALL64
- INT 80
- SYSCALL32
- SYSENTER

The reason we need this information is because for the various 32-bit
entry points we do some very ugly swizzling of registers, which
matters to a ptrace client which wants to modify system call
arguments.
- If the process was started as a 64-bit process, i386 process or x32
process.

This adds up to a minimum of six bits already (and at least two bits on
i386), and that's just a start.

-hpa

--
H. Peter Anvin, Intel Open Source Technology Center
I work for Intel. I don't speak on their behalf.



\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2012-02-06 18:09    [W:0.177 / U:6.512 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site