lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2011]   [Mar]   [4]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH] Make /proc/slabinfo 0400
From
On Mar 3, 2011, at 5:30 PM, Dan Rosenberg wrote:
>> I appreciate your input on this, you've made very reasonable points.
>> I'm just not convinced that those few real users are being substantially
>> inconvenienced, even if there's only a small benefit for the larger
>> population of users who are at risk for attacks.  Perhaps others could
>> contribute their opinions to the discussion.

On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 2:50 AM, Theodore Tso <tytso@mit.edu> wrote:
> Being able to monitor /proc/slabinfo is incredibly useful for finding various
> kernel problems.  We can see if some part of the kernel is out of balance,
> and we can also find memory leaks.   I once saved a school system's Linux
> deployment because their systems were crashing once a week, and becoming
> progressively more unreliable before they crashed, and the school board
> was about to pull the plug.

Indeed. However, I'm not sure we need to expose the number of _active
objects_ to non-CAP_ADMIN users (which could be set to zeros if you
don't have sufficient privileges). Memory leaks can be detected from
the total number of objects anyway, no?

On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 2:50 AM, Theodore Tso <tytso@mit.edu> wrote:
> I wonder if there is some other change we could make to the slab allocator
> that would make it harder for exploit writers without having to protect the
> /proc/slabinfo file.  For example, could we randomly select different free
> objects in a page instead of filling them in sequentially?

We can do something like that if we can live with the performance costs.
--
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2011-03-04 07:55    [W:0.114 / U:1.512 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site