lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2011]   [Feb]   [18]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 3/3] perf events: add timehist option to record and report
On Fri, Feb 18, 2011 at 07:28:20AM -0700, David Ahern wrote:
>
>
> On 02/18/11 00:06, Ingo Molnar wrote:
> >
> > * David Ahern <daahern@cisco.com> wrote:
> >
> >> +--timehist::
> >> + Generate time history output. This shows each sample with a wall-clock
> >> + timestamp and address to symbol conversions. The samples are output in
> >> + the same order they exist in the perf.data file. The --timehist option
> >> + must be used with the record to get wall-clock timestamps.
> >
> > Displaying samples this way is very useful, but how is this different from trace
> > output - i.e. 'perf script' output?
> >
> > There's a 'live logging mode' feature:
> >
> > perf record ./myworkload | perf inject -v -b | perf script -i -
> >
> > ( There's also some work going on to have a separate 'perf trace' utility that will
> > output a linear trace of whatever events in perf.data are. )
> >
> > So unless i'm missing something it would be more useful to extend 'perf script' (or
> > the upcoming 'perf trace') to list regular samples in a perf.data (i.e. not rely on
> > -R raw trace data alone), and of course allow a straightforward utilization of real
> > timestamps, when available.
>
> To date I have not seen any option to show samples with wall-clock
> timestamps. In a sense it pretty-prints the -R format. This allows perf
> samples to be compared to other log files / sources of data to resolve
> an issue.
>
> For example:
>
> Time-of-Day Kernel Timestamp cpu Event Command PID
> IP Symbol Name (DSO Name)
> 22:40:13.831567 858005051634 1 context-switches kworker/1:0 8
> ffffffff8103251e perf_event_task_sched_out ([kernel.kallsyms])
>
> 22:40:13.831683 858005168139 1 context-switches sshd 897
> ffffffff8103251e perf_event_task_sched_out ([kernel.kallsyms])
>
> With the stack callchain option it dumps a line for each address in the
> stack (columns abbreviated here for email):
>
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 ffffffff8103251e perf_event_task_sched_out
> ([kernel.kallsyms])
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 ffffffff81377231 schedule ([kernel.kallsyms])
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 ffffffff81377f3a
> schedule_hrtimeout_range_clock ([kernel.kallsyms])
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 ffffffff81378016 schedule_hrtimeout_range
> ([kernel.kallsyms])
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 ffffffff81103e15 poll_schedule_timeout
> ([kernel.kallsyms])
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 ffffffff8110463c do_select ([kernel.kallsyms])
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 ffffffff811047f4 core_sys_select
> ([kernel.kallsyms])
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 ffffffff81104929 sys_select
> ([kernel.kallsyms])
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 ffffffff81002bc2 system_call
> ([kernel.kallsyms])
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 7f56d4814e93 __GI_select
> (/lib64/libc-2.12.90.so)
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 40560b run_builtin
> (/tmp/build-perf/perf)
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 40580d handle_internal_command
> (/tmp/build-perf/perf)
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 405959 run_argv
> (/tmp/build-perf/perf)
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 405b63 main (/tmp/build-perf/perf)
> 07:24:37.527728 1 sshd 819 7fa49de9fe7d __libc_start_main
> (/lib64/libc-2.12.90.so)
>
>
> This format has allowed us to do an in-depth analysis of scheduling
> (record -e cs -c 1): we can see when was process running, for how long
> it ran, why it was kicked off the processor, how long was it off the
> processor, what ran in between schedulings, etc. If a log file shows a
> process missing a heartbeat you can look at the perf data in the time
> range and see if it had a chance to run. If not where was it blocked.

Oh, in this case I strongly suggest you to use the tracepoint events.

Look at the output of "perf list" and seek the events which name
start with "sched:"

sched:sched_kthread_stop [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_kthread_stop_ret [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_wait_task [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_wakeup [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_wakeup_new [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_switch [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_migrate_task [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_process_free [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_process_exit [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_process_wait [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_process_fork [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_stat_wait [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_stat_sleep [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_stat_iowait [Tracepoint event]
sched:sched_stat_runtime [Tracepoint event]


You have the sched:sched_switch event and many others.

Just try:

perf record -a -e sched:*
perf script

perf-4128 [000] 19242.870025: sched_stat_runtime: comm=perf pid=4128 runtime=7430405 [ns] vruntime=3530192223488
perf-4128 [000] 19242.870042: sched_stat_runtime: comm=perf pid=4128 runtime=23142 [ns] vruntime=3530192246630 [n
perf-4128 [000] 19242.870045: sched_stat_sleep: comm=kondemand/0 pid=59 delay=9979163 [ns]
perf-4128 [000] 19242.870048: sched_wakeup: comm=kondemand/0 pid=59 prio=120 success=1 target_cpu=000
perf-4128 [000] 19242.870063: sched_stat_runtime: comm=perf pid=4128 runtime=21581 [ns] vruntime=3530192268211 [n
perf-4128 [000] 19242.870066: sched_stat_wait: comm=kondemand/0 pid=59 delay=21581 [ns]
perf-4128 [000] 19242.870069: sched_switch: prev_comm=perf prev_pid=4128 prev_prio=120 prev_state=R ==> next_comm
kondemand/0-59 [000] 19242.870091: sched_stat_runtime: comm=kondemand/0 pid=59 runtime=27362 [ns] vruntime=35301862739
kondemand/0-59 [000] 19242.870094: sched_stat_wait: comm=perf pid=4128 delay=27362 [ns]
kondemand/0-59 [000] 19242.870095: sched_switch: prev_comm=kondemand/0 prev_pid=59 prev_prio=120 prev_state=S ==> next

And you can run your own script on these events:

$ sudo ./perf script -g python
generated Python script: perf-script.py

Edit perf-script.py and then run it:

$ perf script -s ./perf-script.py

That also works for perl.

The timestamps will be the cpu time and not the walltime, but at least that seems
to be partly what you seek?


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2011-02-18 19:01    [from the cache]
©2003-2011 Jasper Spaans