lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2011]   [Feb]   [1]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [PATCH 06/11] xen/setup: Skip over 1st gap after System RAM.
From
Date
Not merely possible, it's fairly common.

"Ian Campbell" <Ian.Campbell@eu.citrix.com> wrote:

>On Mon, 2011-01-31 at 22:44 +0000, Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk wrote:
>> If the kernel is booted with dom0_mem=max:512MB and the
>> machine has more than 512MB of RAM, the E820 we get is:
>>
>> Xen: 0000000000100000 - 0000000020000000 (usable)
>> Xen: 00000000b7ee0000 - 00000000b7ee3000 (ACPI NVS)
>>
>> while in actuality it is:
>>
>> (XEN) 0000000000100000 - 00000000b7ee0000 (usable)
>> (XEN) 00000000b7ee0000 - 00000000b7ee3000 (ACPI NVS)
>>
>> Based on that, we would determine that the "gap" between
>> 0x20000 -> 0xb7ee0 is not System RAM and try to assign it to
>> 1-1 mapping. This meant that later on when we setup the page tables
>> we would try to assign those regions to DOMID_IO and the
>> Xen hypervisor would fail such operation. This patch
>> guards against that and sets the "gap" to be after the first
>> non-RAM E820 region.
>
>This seems dodgy to me and makes assumptions about the sanity of the
>BIOS provided e820 maps. e.g. it's not impossible that there are
>systems
>out there with 2 or more little holes under 1M etc.
>
>The truncation (from 0xb7ee0000 to 0x20000000 in this case) happens in
>the dom0 kernel not the hypervisor right? So we can at least know that
>we've done it.
>
>Can we do the identity setup before that truncation happens? If not can
>can we not remember the untruncated map too and refer to it as
>necessary. One way of doing that might be to insert an e820 region
>covering the truncated region to identify it as such (perhaps
>E820_UNUSABLE?) or maybe integrating e.g. with the memblock
>reservations
>(or whatever the early enough allocator is).
>
>The scheme we have is that all pre-ballooned memory goes at the end of
>the e820 right, as opposed to allowing it to first fill truncated
>regions such as this?
>
>Ian.
>
>>
>> Signed-off-by: Konrad Rzeszutek Wilk <konrad.wilk@oracle.com>
>> ---
>> arch/x86/xen/setup.c | 20 ++++++++++++++++++--
>> 1 files changed, 18 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)
>>
>> diff --git a/arch/x86/xen/setup.c b/arch/x86/xen/setup.c
>> index c2a5b5f..5b2ae49 100644
>> --- a/arch/x86/xen/setup.c
>> +++ b/arch/x86/xen/setup.c
>> @@ -147,6 +147,7 @@ static unsigned long __init
>xen_set_identity(const struct e820map *e820)
>> {
>> phys_addr_t last = xen_initial_domain() ? 0 : ISA_END_ADDRESS;
>> phys_addr_t start_pci = last;
>> + phys_addr_t ram_end = last;
>> int i;
>> unsigned long identity = 0;
>>
>> @@ -168,11 +169,26 @@ static unsigned long __init
>xen_set_identity(const struct e820map *e820)
>> if (start > start_pci)
>> identity += set_phys_range_identity(
>> PFN_UP(start_pci), PFN_DOWN(start));
>> - start_pci = end;
>> /* Without saving 'last' we would gooble RAM too. */
>> - last = end;
>> + start_pci = last = ram_end = end;
>> continue;
>> }
>> + /* Gap found right after the 1st RAM region. Skip over it.
>> + * Why? That is b/c if we pass in dom0_mem=max:512MB and
>> + * have in reality 1GB, the E820 is clipped at 512MB.
>> + * In xen_set_pte_init we end up calling xen_set_domain_pte
>> + * which asks Xen hypervisor to alter the ownership of the MFN
>> + * to DOMID_IO. We would try to set that on PFNs from 512MB
>> + * up to the next System RAM region (likely from 0x20000->
>> + * 0x100000). But changing the ownership on "real" RAM regions
>> + * will infuriate Xen hypervisor and we will fail (WARN).
>> + * So instead of trying to set IDENTITY mapping on the gap
>> + * between the System RAM and the first non-RAM E820 region
>> + * we start at the non-RAM E820 region.*/
>> + if (ram_end && start >= ram_end) {
>> + start_pci = start;
>> + ram_end = 0;
>> + }
>> start_pci = min(start, start_pci);
>> last = end;
>> }

--
Sent from my mobile phone. Please pardon any lack of formatting.


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2011-02-01 18:17    [W:0.059 / U:75.236 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site