lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2011]   [Oct]   [3]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH RFC V2 3/5] jump_label: if a key has already been initialized, don't nop it out
On 10/03/2011 08:02 AM, Jason Baron wrote:
> Hi,
>
> (Sorry for the late reply - I was away for a few days).
>
> The early enable is really nice - it means there are not restrictions on
> when jump_label_inc()/dec() can be called which is nice.
>
> comments below.
>
>
> On Sat, Oct 01, 2011 at 02:55:35PM -0700, Jeremy Fitzhardinge wrote:
>> From: Jeremy Fitzhardinge <jeremy.fitzhardinge@citrix.com>
>>
>> If a key has been enabled before jump_label_init() is called, don't
>> nop it out.
>>
>> This removes arch_jump_label_text_poke_early() (which can only nop
>> out a site) and uses arch_jump_label_transform() instead.
>>
>> Signed-off-by: Jeremy Fitzhardinge <jeremy.fitzhardinge@citrix.com>
>> ---
>> include/linux/jump_label.h | 3 ++-
>> kernel/jump_label.c | 20 ++++++++------------
>> 2 files changed, 10 insertions(+), 13 deletions(-)
>>
>> diff --git a/include/linux/jump_label.h b/include/linux/jump_label.h
>> index 1213e9d..c8fb1b3 100644
>> --- a/include/linux/jump_label.h
>> +++ b/include/linux/jump_label.h
>> @@ -45,7 +45,8 @@ extern void jump_label_lock(void);
>> extern void jump_label_unlock(void);
>> extern void arch_jump_label_transform(struct jump_entry *entry,
>> enum jump_label_type type);
>> -extern void arch_jump_label_text_poke_early(jump_label_t addr);
>> +extern void arch_jump_label_transform_early(struct jump_entry *entry,
>> + enum jump_label_type type);
>> extern int jump_label_text_reserved(void *start, void *end);
>> extern void jump_label_inc(struct jump_label_key *key);
>> extern void jump_label_dec(struct jump_label_key *key);
>> diff --git a/kernel/jump_label.c b/kernel/jump_label.c
>> index a8ce450..059202d5 100644
>> --- a/kernel/jump_label.c
>> +++ b/kernel/jump_label.c
>> @@ -121,13 +121,6 @@ static void __jump_label_update(struct jump_label_key *key,
>> }
>> }
>>
>> -/*
>> - * Not all archs need this.
>> - */
>> -void __weak arch_jump_label_text_poke_early(jump_label_t addr)
>> -{
>> -}
>> -
>> static __init int jump_label_init(void)
>> {
>> struct jump_entry *iter_start = __start___jump_table;
>> @@ -139,12 +132,15 @@ static __init int jump_label_init(void)
>> jump_label_sort_entries(iter_start, iter_stop);
>>
>> for (iter = iter_start; iter < iter_stop; iter++) {
>> - arch_jump_label_text_poke_early(iter->code);
>> - if (iter->key == (jump_label_t)(unsigned long)key)
>> + struct jump_label_key *iterk;
>> +
>> + iterk = (struct jump_label_key *)(unsigned long)iter->key;
>> + arch_jump_label_transform(iter, jump_label_enabled(iterk) ?
>> + JUMP_LABEL_ENABLE : JUMP_LABEL_DISABLE);
> The only reason I called this at boot-time was that the 'ideal' x86
> no-op isn't known until boot time. Thus, in the enabled case we could
> skip the the arch_jump_label_transform() call. ie:
>
> if (!enabled)
> arch_jump_label_transform(iter, JUMP_LABEL_DISABLE);


Yep, fair enough.

>
>
>> + if (iterk == key)
>> continue;
>>
>> - key = (struct jump_label_key *)(unsigned long)iter->key;
>> - atomic_set(&key->enabled, 0);
>> + key = iterk;
>> key->entries = iter;
>> #ifdef CONFIG_MODULES
>> key->next = NULL;
>> @@ -212,7 +208,7 @@ void jump_label_apply_nops(struct module *mod)
>> return;
>>
>> for (iter = iter_start; iter < iter_stop; iter++)
>> - arch_jump_label_text_poke_early(iter->code);
>> + arch_jump_label_transform(iter, JUMP_LABEL_DISABLE);
>> }
>>
>> static int jump_label_add_module(struct module *mod)
>> --
>> 1.7.6.2
>>
> hmmm...this is used on module load in smp - so this would introduce a number of
> calls to stop_machine() where we didn't have them before. Yes, module
> load is a very slow path to begin with, but I think its at least worth
> pointing out...

Ah, that explains it - the module stuff certainly isn't "early" except -
I guess - in the module's lifetime.

Well, I suppose I could introduce either second variant of the function,
or add a "live" flag (ie, may be updating code that a processor is
executing), which requires a stop_machine, or direct update if it doesn't.

But is there any reason why we couldn't just generate a reasonably
efficient 5-byte atomic nop in the first place, and get rid of all that
fooling around? It looks like x86 is the only arch where it makes any
difference at all, and how much difference does it really make? Or is
there no one 5-byte atomic nop that works on all x86 variants, aside
from jmp +0?
J


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2011-10-04 01:39    [from the cache]
©2003-2011 Jasper Spaans