lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2011]   [Oct]   [3]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: kernel.org status: hints on how to check your machine for intrusion
> Date: Sat, 01 Oct 2011 14:45:38 -0400
> From: Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
> To: David Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
> Cc: w@1wt.eu, greg@kroah.com, linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
> Subject: Re: kernel.org status: hints on how to check your machine for
> intrusion
>
> On Sat, 2011-10-01 at 14:40 -0400, Steven Rostedt wrote:
> > OK, I decided to attach the perl script anyway. It is very crude, and
> > really needs to be cleaned up for generic use.
> >
>
> I've just been pointed to:
>
> http://www.fail2ban.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
>
> This looks like something similar.
>
> You see, the reason I posted this tool is because I was sure people will
> point me to better ones that do the same thing (and more!) ;)
>

The nice thing about fail2ban is that you can use it to montitor other
ports since many bots are now doing ftp/smtp sasl/imap/imaps/pop3/pop3s
scans to find system accounts and then use the result for an ssh login.

As a warning though, at least on debian the SMTP SASL regex is non
functional and I haven't had time to work out a working one so hopefully
if someone has one it would be helpful. A fix for this is doubly important
since the SASL package has a memory leak on failed login that they have
known about for at least 3 years but haven't bothered fixing. A scanning
bot can take up several gigs of memory in about an hour.

Gerhard


--
Gerhard Mack

gmack@innerfire.net

<>< As a computer, I find your faith in technology amusing.


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2011-10-03 11:59    [from the cache]
©2003-2011 Jasper Spaans