lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2009]   [Aug]   [26]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: RFC: THE OFFLINE SCHEDULER

* Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> wrote:

> On Wed, 26 Aug 2009 16:40:09 -0400 (EDT)
> Christoph Lameter <cl@linux-foundation.org> wrote:
>
> > Peter has not given a solution to the problem. Nor have you.
>
> What problem?
>
> All I've seen is "I want 100% access to a CPU". That's not a problem
> statement - it's an implementation.
>
> What is the problem statement?
>
> My take on these patches: the kernel gives userspace unmediated
> access to memory resources if it wants that. The kernel gives
> userspace unmediated access to IO devices if it wants that. But
> for some reason people freak out at the thought of providing
> unmediated access to CPU resources.

Claiming all user-available CPU time from user-space is already
possible: use SCHED_FIFO - the only question are remaining latencies
in the final 0.01% of CPU time you cannot claim via SCHED_FIFO.

( Btw., this scheduling feature was implemented in Linux well before
raw IO block devices were implemented, so i'm not sure what you
mean by 'freaking out'. )

What we are objecting to are these easy isolation side-hacks for the
remaining 0.01% that fail to address the real problem: the
latencies. Those latencies can hurt not just isolated apps but _non
isolated_ (and latency critical) apps too, and what we insist on is
getting the proper fixes, not just ugly workarounds that side-step
the problem.

( a secondary objection is the extension and extra layering
of something that could be done within existing APIs/ABIs too. We
want to minimize the configuration space. )

> Don't get all religious about this. If the change is clean,
> maintainable and useful then there's no reason to not merge it.

Precisely. This feature as proposed here hinders the correct
solution being implemented - and hence hurts long term
maintainability and hence is a no-merge right now. [It also weakens
the pressure to fix latencies for a much wider set of applications,
hence hurts the quality of Linux in the long run. (i.e. is a net
step backwards)]

Ingo


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2009-08-26 23:37    [W:0.082 / U:1.360 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site