lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2009]   [Dec]   [7]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [RFC,PATCH 14/14] utrace core
From
Date
On Tue, 2009-12-01 at 23:08 +0100, Oleg Nesterov wrote:

> > > @@ -560,6 +625,20 @@ static inline void tracehook_report_deat
> > > int signal, void *death_cookie,
> > > int group_dead)
> > > {
> > > + /*
> > > + * This barrier ensures that our caller's setting of
> > > + * @task->exit_state precedes checking @task->utrace_flags here.
> > > + * If utrace_set_events() was just called to enable
> > > + * UTRACE_EVENT(DEATH), then we are obliged to call
> > > + * utrace_report_death() and not miss it. utrace_set_events()
> > > + * uses tasklist_lock to synchronize enabling the bit with the
> > > + * actual change to @task->exit_state, but we need this barrier
> > > + * to be sure we see a flags change made just before our caller
> > > + * took the tasklist_lock.
> > > + */
> > > + smp_mb();
> > > + if (task_utrace_flags(task) & _UTRACE_DEATH_EVENTS)
> > > + utrace_report_death(task, death_cookie, group_dead, signal);
> > > }
> >
> > I don't think its allowed to pair a mb with a lock-barrier, since the
> > lock barriers are semi-permeable.
>
> Could you clarify?

According to memory-barriers.txt a mb can be paired with mb,wmb,rmb
depending on the situation.

For LOCK it states:

(1) LOCK operation implication:

Memory operations issued after the LOCK will be completed after the LOCK
operation has completed.

Memory operations issued before the LOCK may be completed after the LOCK
operation has completed.

Which is not something I can see making sense to pair with an mb.

So either the comment is confusing and its again referring to an UNLOCK
+LOCK pair, or there's something fishy

> > > @@ -589,10 +668,20 @@ static inline void set_notify_resume(str
> > > * asynchronously, this will be called again before we return to
> > > * user mode.
> > > *
> > > - * Called without locks.
> > > + * Called without locks. However, on some machines this may be
> > > + * called with interrupts disabled.
> > > */
> > > static inline void tracehook_notify_resume(struct pt_regs *regs)
> > > {
> > > + struct task_struct *task = current;
> > > + /*
> > > + * This pairs with the barrier implicit in set_notify_resume().
> > > + * It ensures that we read the nonzero utrace_flags set before
> > > + * set_notify_resume() was called by utrace setup.
> > > + */
> > > + smp_rmb();
> > > + if (task_utrace_flags(task))
> > > + utrace_resume(task, regs);
> > > }
> >
> > Sending an IPI implies the mb?
>
> Yes, but this has nothing to do with IPI. The caller, do_notify_resume(),
> does:
> clear_thread_flag(TIF_NOTIFY_RESUME);
> tracehook_notify_resume:
> if (task_utrace_flags(task))
> utrace_resume();
>
> We should not read task_utrace_flags() before we clear TIF_NOTIFY_RESUME.

Then this comment needs an update.. that wasn't at all clear to me.

> > > +static inline struct utrace *task_utrace_struct(struct task_struct *task)
> > > +{
> > > + struct utrace *utrace;
> > > +
> > > + /*
> > > + * This barrier ensures that any prior load of task->utrace_flags
> > > + * is ordered before this load of task->utrace. We use those
> > > + * utrace_flags checks in the hot path to decide to call into
> > > + * the utrace code. The first attach installs task->utrace before
> > > + * setting task->utrace_flags nonzero, with a barrier between.
> > > + * See utrace_task_alloc().
> > > + */
> > > + smp_rmb();
> > > + utrace = task->utrace;
> > > +
> > > + smp_read_barrier_depends(); /* See utrace_task_alloc(). */
> > > + return utrace;
> > > +}
> >
> > I spot two barriers here, but only 1 over in utrace_task_alloc(), hmm?
>
> smp_read_barrier_depends() pairs with utrace_task_alloc()->wmb().
>
> smp_rmb() is needed for another reason. Suppose the code does:
>
> if (task_utrace_flags() & SOMETHING)
> do_something_with(task->utrace);
>
> if we race with utrace_attach_task(), we can see ->utrace_flags != 0
> but task->utrace == NULL without rmb().

Still not clear what we pair with.. There is no obvious barrier in
utrace_attach_task() nor a comment referring to this site.

> > > +struct utrace_engine {
> > > +/* private: */
> > > + struct kref kref;
> > > + void (*release)(void *);
> > > + struct list_head entry;
> > > +
> > > +/* public: */
> > > + const struct utrace_engine_ops *ops;
> > > + void *data;
> > > +
> > > + unsigned long flags;
> > > +};
> >
> > Sorry, the kernel is written in C, not C++.
>
> Hmm. I almost never read the comments, but these 2 look very clear
> to me ;)

I see no point in adding comments like that at all.

> > > + * Most callbacks take an @action argument, giving the resume action
> > > + * chosen by other tracing engines. All callbacks take an @engine
> > > + * argument, and a @task argument, which is always equal to @current.
> >
> > Given that some functions have a lot of arguments (depleting regparam),
> > isn't it more expensive to push current on the stack than it is to
> > simply read it again?
>
> Yes, perhaps. Only ->report_reap() really needs @task, it may be
> !current.
>
> > > +struct utrace_engine_ops {
> >
> > > + u32 (*report_signal)(u32 action,
> > > + struct utrace_engine *engine,
> > > + struct task_struct *task,
> > > + struct pt_regs *regs,
> > > + siginfo_t *info,
> > > + const struct k_sigaction *orig_ka,
> > > + struct k_sigaction *return_ka);
> >
> > > + u32 (*report_clone)(enum utrace_resume_action action,
> > > + struct utrace_engine *engine,
> > > + struct task_struct *parent,
> > > + unsigned long clone_flags,
> > > + struct task_struct *child);
> >
> > > +};
> >
> > Seems inconsistent on u32 vs enum utrace_resume_action.
>
> Well, this u32 can hold utrace_resume_action | utrace_signal_action,
> for example.

Sure, but then make all of them u32, or unsigned int, as that gets mixed
in below.

> > > +struct utrace_examiner {
> > > +/* private: */
> > > + long state;
> > > + unsigned long ncsw;
> > > +};
> >
> > Again, its not C++, if you want a private state like that, use an opaque
> > type, like:
> >
> > struct utrace_examiner;
> >
> > and only define the thing in utrace.c or something.
>
> Then the caller of utrace_prepare_examine() has to alloc utrace_examiner
> somehow. I disagree here. But of course we can remove this comment.

Ah, right then simply drop the comment.

> > > +static bool utrace_task_alloc(struct task_struct *task)
> > > +{
> > > + struct utrace *utrace = kmem_cache_zalloc(utrace_cachep, GFP_KERNEL);
> > > + if (unlikely(!utrace))
> > > + return false;
> > > + spin_lock_init(&utrace->lock);
> > > + INIT_LIST_HEAD(&utrace->attached);
> > > + INIT_LIST_HEAD(&utrace->attaching);
> > > + utrace->resume = UTRACE_RESUME;
> > > + task_lock(task);
> > > + if (likely(!task->utrace)) {
> > > + /*
> > > + * This barrier makes sure the initialization of the struct
> > > + * precedes the installation of the pointer. This pairs
> > > + * with smp_read_barrier_depends() in task_utrace_struct().
> > > + */
> > > + smp_wmb();
> > > + task->utrace = utrace;
> > > + }
> > > + task_unlock(task);
> > > + /*
> > > + * That unlock after storing task->utrace acts as a memory barrier
> > > + * ordering any subsequent task->utrace_flags store afterwards.
> > > + * This pairs with smp_rmb() in task_utrace_struct().
> > > + */
> > > + if (unlikely(task->utrace != utrace))
> > > + kmem_cache_free(utrace_cachep, utrace);
> > > + return true;
> > > +}
> >
> > Again, not sure we can pair an UNLOCK-barrier with a RMB. In fact, both
> > are NOPs on x86.
>
> We can't. I think the comment is confusing. We need the barrier
> between setting "task->utrace = utrace" and changing ->utrace_flags.
> We have unlock+lock in between, this implies mb().

So this is the task_unlock() in utrace_task_alloc() and the
spin_lock(&utrace->lock) in utrace_add_engine() ?

Talk about non-obvious.

> > > +static inline int utrace_attach_delay(struct task_struct *target)
> > > +{
> > > + if ((target->flags & PF_STARTING) &&
> > > + task_utrace_struct(current) &&
> > > + task_utrace_struct(current)->cloning != target)
> > > + do {
> > > + schedule_timeout_interruptible(1);
> > > + if (signal_pending(current))
> > > + return -ERESTARTNOINTR;
> > > + } while (target->flags & PF_STARTING);
> > > +
> > > + return 0;
> > > +}
> >
> > Quite gross this.. can't we key off the
> > tracehoook_report_clone_complete() and use a wakeup there?
>
> Yes, it would be very nice to avoid this schedule_timeout_interruptible().
> But currently we don't see a simple solution, on the TODO list. But, to
> clarify, this case is very unlikely.

Use a global wait-queue and put a wakeup_all in
tracehook_report_clone_complete() or wherever that ends up in utrace?

> > Furthermore I'd add a function like:
> >
> > static struct utrace_engine_ops *
> > get_utrace_ops(struct utrace_engine *engine, unsigned long *flags)
> > {
> > *flags = engine->flags;
> > /*
> > * This pairs with the barrier in mark_engine_detached().
> > * It makes sure that we never see the old ops vector with
> > * the new flags, in case the original vector had no
> > * report_quiesce.
> > */
> > smp_rmb();
> > return engine->ops;
> > }
> >
> > to take out and explicitly comment that common bit.
> >
> > Also, I'm not quite sure on why we play so many barrier games, looking
> > at start_callback() we have 2 barriers in the callback loop, why not a
> > per engine lock?
>
> Exactly to avoid the lock, I guess ;)

I'm really thinking this code ought to get simplified a lot, there's too
much non-obvious barriers.

Then, and only if performance numbers show it, add back some of these
optimizations, in simple small steps, that way its much easier to review
as well.

> > > + /*
> > > + * In theory spin_lock() doesn't imply rcu_read_lock().
> > > + * Once we clear ->utrace_flags this task_struct can go away
> > > + * because tracehook_prepare_release_task() path does not take
> > > + * utrace->lock when ->utrace_flags == 0.
> > > + */
> > > + rcu_read_lock();
> > > + task->utrace_flags = flags;
> > > + spin_unlock(&utrace->lock);
> > > + rcu_read_unlock();
> >
> > yuck!
> >
> > why not simply keep a task reference over the utrace_reset call?
>
> Yes, we could use get_task_struct() instead. Not sure this would
> be more clean, though.

For one it would allow getting rid of that insane assymetric locking.

> > > +static inline void finish_callback_report(struct task_struct *task,
> > > + struct utrace *utrace,
> > > + struct utrace_report *report,
> > > + struct utrace_engine *engine,
> > > + enum utrace_resume_action action)
> > > +{
> > > + /*
> > > + * If utrace_control() was used, treat that like UTRACE_DETACH here.
> > > + */
> > > + if (action == UTRACE_DETACH || engine->ops == &utrace_detached_ops) {
> > > + engine->ops = &utrace_detached_ops;
> > > + report->detaches = true;
> > > + return;
> > > + }
> > > +
> > > + if (action < report->action)
> > > + report->action = action;
> > > +
> > > + if (action != UTRACE_STOP) {
> > > + if (action < report->resume_action)
> > > + report->resume_action = action;
> > > +
> > > + if (engine_wants_stop(engine)) {
> > > + spin_lock(&utrace->lock);
> > > + clear_engine_wants_stop(engine);
> > > + spin_unlock(&utrace->lock);
> > > + }
> >
> > Reads funny, but I guess it can only race the right way round?
>
> Not sure I understand... could you explain?

It can only race with another thread also clearing the bit, not with one
setting the bit? Otherwise there's no guarantee its not set after that
if stmt.

> > > +void utrace_report_jctl(int notify, int what)
> > > +{
> > > + struct task_struct *task = current;
> > > + struct utrace *utrace = task_utrace_struct(task);
> > > + INIT_REPORT(report);
> > > +
> > > + spin_unlock_irq(&task->sighand->siglock);
> > > +
> > > + REPORT(task, utrace, &report, UTRACE_EVENT(JCTL),
> > > + report_jctl, what, notify);
> > > +
> > > + spin_lock_irq(&task->sighand->siglock);
> > > +}
> >
> > So much documentation, and non of it says that the JCTL (funny name btw)
> > callback is done holding siglock... tskk.
>
> Not sure I understand, but we unlock ->siglock before REPORT(). If you mean
> that utrace_report_jctl() is called under ->siglock, then yes.

Apparently means I'm cross-eyed as I read it to lock before and unlock
after :-/



\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2009-12-07 19:37    [W:0.192 / U:4.044 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site