lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2008]   [Jul]   [29]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
    /
    SubjectRe: [patch 2/4] Configure out file locking features
    From
    Date

    On Tue, 2008-07-29 at 12:17 -0600, Matthew Wilcox wrote:
    > On Tue, Jul 29, 2008 at 05:45:22PM +0200, Thomas Petazzoni wrote:
    > > This patch adds the CONFIG_FILE_LOCKING option which allows to remove
    > > support for advisory locks. With this patch enabled, the flock()
    > > system call, the F_GETLK, F_SETLK and F_SETLKW operations of fcntl()
    > > and NFS support are disabled. These features are not necessarly needed
    > > on embedded systems. It allows to save ~11 Kb of kernel code and data:
    > >
    > > text data bss dec hex filename
    > > 1125436 118764 212992 1457192 163c28 vmlinux.old
    > > 1114299 118564 212992 1445855 160fdf vmlinux
    > > -11137 -200 0 -11337 -2C49 +/-
    > >
    > > This patch has originally been written by Matt Mackall
    > > <mpm@selenic.com>, and is part of the Linux Tiny project.
    > >
    > > Signed-off-by: Thomas Petazzoni <thomas.petazzoni@free-electrons.com>
    >
    > In principle, I think this is a great idea.
    >
    > > config NFS_FS
    > > tristate "NFS client support"
    > > - depends on INET
    > > + depends on INET && FILE_LOCKING
    > > select LOCKD
    > > select SUNRPC
    > > select NFS_ACL_SUPPORT if NFS_V3_ACL
    >
    > I think this part is a little lazy. It should be possible to support
    > NFS without file locking. I suspect that's really not in-scope for the
    > linux-tiny tree as currently envisaged with the focus on embedded
    > devices that probably don't use NFS anyway. Do we want to care about
    > the situation of a machine with fixed workload, that doesn't need file
    > locking, but does use NFS?

    I would lean towards no, but if someone comes along who cares, they're
    welcome to try it. This stuff all has to strike a balance between
    savings and effort/complexity/maintainability, so any time the submitter
    is too lazy to cover a less common use case, it's probably a good sign
    they're approaching that tipping point.

    On the other hand, if you think it's trivial to do a locking-ectomy on
    NFS, I'd be happy to see it.

    The typical embedded NFS-based devices are NAS servers and media players
    and are going to be more concerned about things like page cache
    balancing.

    --
    Mathematics is the supreme nostalgia of our time.



    \
     
     \ /
      Last update: 2008-07-29 21:07    [W:0.023 / U:0.368 seconds]
    ©2003-2016 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site