lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2008]   [Nov]   [20]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
SubjectRe: Enterprise workload testing for storage and filesystems
From
On Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 2:47 PM, James Bottomley
<James.Bottomley@hansenpartnership.com> wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> High on our list at the recent Linux Foundation end user summit was
> obtaining a method of obtaining enterprise workloads (or simulators) we
> can run in our own testing environments. The main problem being that
> the data sets used by the systems are usually secret or under regulatory
> embargo and thus unobtainable. However, several participants noted that
> regulatory prohibitions also extended to their own in-house IT team,
> thus they had had to develop simulators for the workloads which, since
> they contained no customer data, might be more widely distributable.

Google has the same concerns. Hoping to work through those, last year
I arranged funding for UNSW (Joshua Root) to develop a GPL linux block
layer replay tool:
http://www.gelato.unsw.edu.au/IA64wiki/JoshuaRoot/MarkovChains

Unfortunately, I've not been able to address all concerns with this
and thus can't offer any google specific markov chains. :( Still I
hope this tool can be of use to others.


> Fidelity National Information Service were the first to try this.
> They've kicked off a sourceforge site for their stress testing tool
> (which is the same tool they use in their own qualification labs). The
> source for the tool is available here:
>
> http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=11026&package_id=298597

Awesome! Kudos!

> And it comes with a fairly detailed readme explaining what it's trying
> to simulate and why. Hopefully this will give us all a much better
> insight into both enterprise workloads and the way enterprise IT
> departments conduct testing.
>
> Let's see how our storage and filesystem tuning measures up to this.

*nod*

thanks,
grant


\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2008-11-21 05:45    [W:0.091 / U:4.748 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site