lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2007]   [Mar]   [1]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
    /
    From
    SubjectRe: 2.6.21-rc1: known regressions (part 2)
    Date
    On Thursday, 1 March 2007 15:52, Ingo Molnar wrote:
    >
    > * Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> wrote:
    >
    > > hm. There's some weird bisection artifact here. Here are the commits i
    > > tested, in git-log order:
    > >
    > > #1 commit 01363220f5d23ef68276db8974e46a502e43d01d bad
    > > #2 commit ee404566f97f9254433399fbbcfa05390c7c55f7 bad
    > > #3 commit f3ccb06f3b8e0cf42b579db21f3ca7f17fcc3f38 good
    > > #4 commit c827ba4cb49a30ce581201fd0ba2be77cde412c7 bad
    > >
    > > if i tell git-bisect that #1 is bad and #3 is good, then it offers me
    > > #2 - that's OK. But when i tell it that #2 is bad, it offers #4 -
    > > which is out of order! The bisection goes off into la-la land after
    > > that and never gets back to a commit that is /after/ the good commit.
    > > How is this possible? (I upgraded from git-1.4.4 to 1.5.0 to make sure
    > > this isnt some git bug that's already fixed.)
    > >
    > > i'll try to straighten this out manually, perhaps #3 is in some merge
    > > branch that confuses bisection. Or maybe i misunderstood how
    > > git-bisect works.
    >
    > git-bisect gets royally confused on those ACPI merge branches around
    > commit c0cd79d11412969b6b8fa1624cdc1277db82e2fe. Here are my test
    > results so far:
    >
    > commit 01363220f5d23ef68276db8974e46a502e43d01d: bad
    > commit 255f0385c8e0d6b9005c0e09fffb5bd852f3b506: bad
    > commit c0cd79d11412969b6b8fa1624cdc1277db82e2fe: bad
    > commit c24e912b61b1ab2301c59777134194066b06465c: good
    > commit e9e2cdb412412326c4827fc78ba27f410d837e6e: bad
    > commit 79bf2bb335b85db25d27421c798595a2fa2a0e82: bad
    > commit fc955f670c0a66aca965605dae797e747b2bef7d: good
    > commit 70c0846e430881967776582e13aefb81407919f1: good
    > commit 414f827c46973ba39320cfb43feb55a0eeb9b4e8: bad
    > commit f3ccb06f3b8e0cf42b579db21f3ca7f17fcc3f38: good
    > commit 5f0b1437e0708772b6fecae5900c01c3b5f9b512: bad
    > commit b878ca5d37953ad1c4578b225a13a3c3e7e743b7: bad
    > commit c2902c8ae06762d941fab64198467f78cab6f8cd: bad
    > commit 12e74f7d430655f541b85018ea62bcd669094bd7: bad
    > commit 3388c37e04ec0e35ebc1b4c732fdefc9ea938f3b: bad
    > commit 9f4bd5dde81b5cb94e4f52f2f05825aa0422f1ff: bad
    >
    > the results are totally reproducible (i re-tried a few of both the good
    > and the bad commits), i.e. it's not a sporadic condition. Also, a number
    > of the 'bad' commits have no dynticks stuff in them at all, so i'd
    > exclude dynticks.
    >
    > could someone suggest a sane way to go with this? Perhaps suggest
    > specific commit IDs to test?

    Hm, does 2.6.20-mm2 work? If not, you can bisect the broken-out sereis
    with quilt.

    Rafael
    -
    To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
    the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
    More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
    Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

    \
     
     \ /
      Last update: 2007-03-01 17:13    [W:0.025 / U:32.468 seconds]
    ©2003-2016 Jasper Spaans. hosted at Digital OceanAdvertise on this site