lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2006]   [Mar]   [23]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [2.6.16 PATCH] Connector: Filesystem Events Connector
Evgeniy Polyakov wrote:
> On Wed, Mar 22, 2006 at 11:43:28PM -0800, Matt Helsley (matthltc@us.ibm.com) wrote:
>
>> On Wed, 2006-03-22 at 22:58 +0800, Yi Yang wrote:
>>
>>> This patch implements a new connector, Filesystem Event Connector,
>>> the user can monitor filesystem activities via it, currently, it
>>> can monitor access, attribute change, open, create, modify, delete,
>>> move and close of any file or directory.
>>>
>>> Every filesystem event will include tgid, uid and gid of the process
>>> which triggered this event, process name, file or directory name
>>> operated by it.
>>>
>>> Filesystem events connector is never a duplicate of inotify, inotify
>>> just concerns change on file or directory, Beagle uses it to watch
>>> file changes in order to regenerate index for it, inotify can't tell
>>> us who did that change and what is its process name, but filesystem
>>> events connector can do these, moreover inotify's overhead is greater
>>> than filesystem events connector, inotify needs compare inode with
>>> watched file or directories list to decide whether it should generate an
>>> inotify_event, some locks also increase overhead, filesystem event
>>> connector hasn't these overhead, it just generates a fsevent and send.
>>>
>>> To be important, filesystem event connector doesn't add any new system
>>> call, the user space application can make use of it by netlink socket,
>>> but inotify added several system calls, many events mechanism in kernel
>>> have used netlink as communication way with user space, for example,
>>> KOBJECT_UEVENT, PROC_EVENTS, to use netlink will make it more possible
>>> to unify events interface to netlink, the user space application can use
>>> it very easy.
>>>
>>> Signed-off-by: Yi Yang <yang.y.yi@gmail.com>
>>>
>
> Ugh, I like the idea!
>
>
>>> --- a/include/linux/connector.h.orig 2006-03-15 23:21:37.000000000 +0800
>>> +++ b/include/linux/connector.h 2006-03-15 23:23:09.000000000 +0800
>>> @@ -34,6 +34,8 @@
>>> #define CN_VAL_PROC 0x1
>>> #define CN_IDX_CIFS 0x2
>>> #define CN_VAL_CIFS 0x1
>>> +#define CN_IDX_FS 0x3
>>> +#define CN_VAL_FS 0x1
>>>
>
>
> Please add some on-line comment about what it is here.
>
OK.
>
>>> #define CN_NETLINK_USERS 1
>>>
>
>
> This must be increased each time new id is added.
> Although connector code does allocation with reserve, better to not
> exhaust it.
> Please increase it to 3.
>
> ...
>
>
I'll do it.
>>> +/*
>>> + * Userspace sends this enum to register with the kernel that it is listening
>>> + * for events on the connector.
>>> + */
>>> +enum fsevent_mode {
>>> + FSEVENT_LISTEN = 1,
>>> + FSEVENT_IGNORE = 2
>>> +};
>>> +
>>>
>> Process Events Connector uses this mechanism to avoid most of the event
>> generation code if there are no listeners.
>>
>> Michael Kerrisk has privately suggested to me that this mechanism gives
>> userspace too much rope with which to hang itself. I think it just gives
>> userspace more rope.
>>
>> That said, perhaps we can shorten the rope by adding a connector
>> function to quickly return a value indicating if a process in userspace
>> is listening to messages sent by the kernel. Then connectors could use
>> that function rather that reinvent the same mechanism.
>>
>
> Btw, current connector code performs check for listeners before it
> allocates any skbs.
> If there are no listenres -ESRCH is returned from cn_netlink_send().
>
> ...
>
>
>> Pull the assignment out of the condition. You're not saving any space by
>> putting it into the if () and it's harder to read. I don't think the
>> __u8 cast is necessary..
>>
>>
>>> + printk("cn_fs: out of memory\n");
>>>
>> missing printk tag
>>
>
> Do not print such info at all.
>
OK.
>
>>> +void raise_fsevent(struct dentry * dentryp, u32 mask)
>>> +{
>>> + __raise_fsevent(dentryp->d_name.name, NULL, mask);
>>> +}
>>> +EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(raise_fsevent);
>>> +
>>> +void raise_fsevent_create(struct inode * inode, const char * name, u32 mask)
>>> +{
>>> + __raise_fsevent(name, NULL, mask);
>>> +}
>>> +EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(raise_fsevent_create);
>>> +
>>> +void raise_fsevent_move(struct inode * olddir, const char * oldname,
>>> + struct inode * newdir, const char * newname, u32 mask)
>>> +{
>>> + __raise_fsevent(oldname, newname, mask);
>>> +}
>>> +EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL(raise_fsevent_move);
>>>
>
> Are there external modules which might use it?
>
Yes, nfs will use it indirectly, because fsnotify is a common file
system code path. if nfs is configured into module, compiler will complain
.

-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2006-03-24 02:27    [from the cache]
©2003-2011 Jasper Spaans