lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2006]   [Nov]   [28]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: failed 'ljmp' in linear addressing mode
On Tue, Nov 28, 2006 at 08:46:44AM -0500, linux-os (Dick Johnson) wrote:
>
> On Mon, 27 Nov 2006, Jun Sun wrote:
>
> >
> > On Mon, Nov 27, 2006 at 08:58:57AM -0500, linux-os (Dick Johnson) wrote:
> >>
> >> I think it probably resets the instant that you turn off paging. To
> >> turn off paging, you need to copy some code (properly linked) to an
> >> area where there is a 1:1 mapping between virtual and physical addresses.
> >> A safe place is somewhere below 1 megabyte. Then you need to set up a
> >> call descriptor so you can call that code (you can ljump if you never
> >> plan to get back). You then need to clear interrupts on all CPUs (use a
> >> spin-lock). Once you are executing from the new area, you reset your
> >> segments to the new area. The call descriptor would have already set
> >> CS, as would have the long-jump. At this time you can turn off paging
> >> and flush the TLB. You are now in linear-address protected mode.
> >>
> >
> > Thanks for the reply. But I am pretty much sure I did above correctly.
> > I use single-instruction infinite loop in the call path to verify
> > that control does reach last 'ljmp' but not the jump destination.
> >
> > Below is the hack I made to machine_kexec.c file. As you can see, I
> > managed to make the identical mapping between virtual and physical addresses.
> >
> > Note I did not copy the code into the first 1M. In fact the code
> > is located at 0xc0477000 (0x00477000 in physical). I thought that should be
> > OK as I did not really go all the way back to real-address mode.
> >
> > That last suspect I have now is the wrong value in CS descriptor. Does kernel
> > have a suitable CS descriptor for the last ljmep to 0x10000000 in linear
> > addressing mode? The CS descriptor seems to be a pretty dark magic to me ...
> >
> > Cheers.
> >
> > Jun
> >
> > -----------------
> > diff -Nru linux-2.6.17.14-1st/arch/i386/kernel/machine_kexec.c.orig linux-2.6.17.14-1st/arch/i386/kernel/machine_kexec.c
> > --- linux-2.6.17.14-1st/arch/i386/kernel/machine_kexec.c.orig 2006-10-13 11:55:04.000000000 -0700
> > +++ linux-2.6.17.14-1st/arch/i386/kernel/machine_kexec.c 2006-11-22 15:01:45.000000000 -0800
> > @@ -212,3 +212,19 @@
> > rnk = (relocate_new_kernel_t) reboot_code_buffer;
> > (*rnk)(page_list, reboot_code_buffer, image->start, cpu_has_pae);
> > }
> > +
> > +extern void do_os_switching(void);
> > +void os_switch(void)
> > +{
> > + void (*foo)(void);
> > +
> > + /* absolutely no irq */
> > + local_irq_disable();
> > +
> > + /* create identity mapping */
> > + foo=virt_to_phys(do_os_switching);
> > + identity_map_page((unsigned long)foo);
> > +
> > + /* jump to the real address */
> > + foo();
> > +}
> >
> Get a copy of the Intel 486 Microprocessor Reference Manual or read it on-
> line. There is no way that you can make a call like that.

By "a call like that", you mean "foo()"? Are you sure about that?

The machine_kexec() function in the same file is basically doing the
same way (i.e., use "call *$eax" instead of "ljmp"). That is where I got
my idea from.

In addition, if I put "1: jmp 1b" instruction anywhere *inside*
do_os_switching() I would get infinite hanging instead of reboot,
which seems to suggest I *did* jump into do_os_switching() successfully.

According to Intel Architecture Software Developer's Manual (1997), Vol 3,
page 8-14:

"2. If paging is enabled perform the following operations:

- Transfer program control to linear addresses that are identity mapped to
physical addresses (that is, linear addresses equal physical addresses)
...
"

it does not indicate one has to use "ljmp" to do this control transfer.

> You would need to
> call through a task-gate or otherwise set the code-segment and the instruction
> pointer at the same instant. First, look at the startup code for a GDT entry
> that maps the linear address-space you are using, PLUS allows execution. If
> there isn't such an entry, modify an existing one to allow execution. Remember
> that CS value, 'segment' in this example. It is probably 0x08, but I don't have
> the kernel source on this machine. Do a far jump through something
> created as:
> .byte 0xea ; Jmp instruction
> .short $segment ; Your segment selector
> .word $where & ~0xc0000000 ; Your physical offset
> where: invd ; Invalidate cache
> movl $segment, %eax ; Get your segment
> movl %eax, %ds ; Set a couple segments
> movl %eax, %es
>
> This must be IN your code path! Now, you are executing at the same
> 1:1 physical:virtual address. You can remove paging as:
>
> movl %cr0, %eax ; Get value
> andl ~$0x80000000, %eax ; Turn off high bit
> movl %eax, %cr0 ; Write back
>
> You are still in protected mode, you now have paging disabled.
>

I tried this also. There is no difference in behavior, i.e., it would
hang with "1: jmp 1b" inside and it would reboot without that debugging
line.

As you can see, I am pretty convinced that the last instruction,
"ljmp $(__KERNEL_CS), $0x10000000", is where the problem is. (BTW,
I also have "1: jmp 1b" instruction at 0x10000000).

Cheers.

Jun
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2006-11-28 20:47    [W:0.049 / U:24.468 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site