lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2005]   [Jul]   [5]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: page allocation/attributes question (i386/x86_64 specific)
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 15:02:26 -0500 Stuart_Hayes@Dell.com wrote:

| Hayes, Stuart wrote:
| >> So, if I understand correctly what's going on in x86_64, your fix
| >> wouldn't be applicable to i386. In x86_64, every large page has a
| >> correct "ref_prot" that is the normal setting for that page... but in
| >> i386, the kernel text area does not--it should ideally be split into
| >> small pages all the time if there are both kernel code & free pages
| >> residing in the same 2M area.
| >>
| >> Stuart
| >
| > (This isn't a submission--I'm just posting this for comments.)
| >
| > Right now, any large page that touches anywhere from PAGE_OFFSET to
| > __init_end is initially set up as a large, executable page... but
| > some of this area contains data & free pages. The patch below adds a
| > "cleanup_nx_in_kerneltext()" function, called at the end of
| > free_initmem(), which changes these pages--except for the range from
| > "_text" to "_etext"--to PAGE_KERNEL (i.e., non-executable).
| >
| > This does result in two large pages being split up into small PTEs
| > permanently, but all the non-code regions will be non-executable, and
| > change_page_attr() will work correctly.
| >
| > What do you think of this? I have tested this on 2.6.12.
| >
| > (I've attached the patch as a file, too, since my mail server can't
| > be convinced to not wrap text.)
| >
| > Stuart
| >
|
| Andi--
|
| I made another pass at this. This does roughly the same thing, but it
| doesn't create the new "change_page_attr_perm()" functions. With this
| patch, the change to init.c (cleanup_nx_in_kerneltext()) is optional. I
| changed __change_page_attr() so that, if the page to be changed is part
| of a large executable page, it splits the page up *keeping the
| executability of the extra 511 pages*, and then marks the new PTE page
| as reserved so that it won't be reverted.
|
| So, basically, without the changes to init.c, the NX bits for data in
| the first two big pages won't get fixed until someone calls
| change_page_attr() on them. If NX is disabled, these patches have no
| functional effect at all.
|
| How does this look?

Look? It has lots of bad line breaks and other style issues.

But I'll let Andi comment on the technical issues.

| -----
|
| diff -purN linux-2.6.12grep/arch/i386/mm/init.c
| linux-2.6.12/arch/i386/mm/init.c
| --- linux-2.6.12grep/arch/i386/mm/init.c 2005-07-01
| 15:09:27.000000000 -0500
| +++ linux-2.6.12/arch/i386/mm/init.c 2005-07-05 14:32:57.000000000
| -0500
| @@ -666,6 +666,28 @@ static int noinline do_test_wp_bit(void)
| return flag;
| }
|
| +/*
| + * In kernel_physical_mapping_init(), any big pages that contained
| kernel text area were
| + * set up as big executable pages. This function should be called when
| the initmem
| + * is freed, to correctly set up the executable & non-executable pages
| in this area.
| + */
| +static void cleanup_nx_in_kerneltext(void)
| +{
| + unsigned long from, to;
| +
| + if (!nx_enabled) return;

return; on separate line.

| + from = PAGE_OFFSET;
| + to = (unsigned long)_text & PAGE_MASK;
| + for (; from<to; from += PAGE_SIZE)
from < to

(i.e., use the spacebar)

| + change_page_attr(virt_to_page(from), 1, PAGE_KERNEL);
| +
| + from = ((unsigned long)_etext + PAGE_SIZE - 1) & PAGE_MASK;
| + to = ((unsigned long)__init_end + LARGE_PAGE_SIZE) &
| LARGE_PAGE_MASK;
| + for (; from<to; from += PAGE_SIZE)

add spaces: from < to

| + change_page_attr(virt_to_page(from), 1, PAGE_KERNEL);
| +}
| +
| void free_initmem(void)
| {
| unsigned long addr;


---
~Randy
-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-07-05 23:44    [W:0.022 / U:6.380 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site