lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2005]   [Apr]   [6]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
Subjectbdflush/rpciod high CPU utilization, profile does not make sense

Hello list,

Setup;
NFS server (dual opteron, HW RAID, SCA disk enclosure) on 2.6.11.6
NFS client (dual PIII) on 2.6.11.6

Both on switched gigabit ethernet - I use NFSv3 over UDP (tried TCP but
this makes no difference).

Problem; during simple tests such as a 'cp largefile0 largefile1' on the
client (under the mountpoint from the NFS server), the client becomes
extremely laggy, NFS writes are slow, and I see very high CPU
utilization by bdflush and rpciod.

For example, writing a single 8G file with dd will give me about
20MB/sec (I get 60+ MB/sec locally on the server), and the client rarely
drops below 40% system CPU utilization.

I tried profiling the client (booting with profile=2), but the profile
traces do not make sense; a profile from a single write test where the
client did not at any time drop below 30% system time (and frequently
were at 40-50%) gives me something like:

raven:~# less profile3 | sort -nr | head
257922 total 2.6394
254739 default_idle 5789.5227
960 smp_call_function 4.0000
888 __might_sleep 5.6923
569 finish_task_switch 4.7417
176 kmap_atomic 1.7600
113 __wake_up 1.8833
74 kmap 1.5417
64 kunmap_atomic 5.3333

The difference between default_idle and total is 1.2% - but I never saw
system CPU utilization under 30%...

Besides, there's basically nothing in the profile that rhymes with
rpciod or bdflush (the two high-hitters on top during the test).

What do I do?

Performance sucks and the profiles do not make sense...

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated,

Thank you!

--

/ jakob

-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-04-06 18:09    [W:0.072 / U:1.736 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site