lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2005]   [Dec]   [10]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [ANNOUNCE] first stable release of OpenVZ kernel virtualization solution
Hello,

By curiosity, what is the status for IPv6 in OpenVZ (I saw that it was
in the roadmap on the website, but maybe you have more informations) ?

thanks
--
Philippe Pegon

Kirill Korotaev wrote:
> Hello,
>
> We are happy to announce the release of a stable version of the OpenVZ
> software, located at http://openvz.org/.
>
> OpenVZ is a kernel virtualization solution which can be considered as a
> natural step in the OS kernel evolution: after multiuser and
> multitasking functionality there comes an OpenVZ feature of having
> multiple environments.
>
> Virtualization lets you divide a system into separate isolated
> execution environments (called VPSs - Virtual Private Servers). From the
> point of view of the VPS owner (root), it looks like a stand-alone
> server. Each VPS has its own filesystem tree, process tree (starting
> from init as in a real system) and so on. The single-kernel approach
> makes it possible to virtualize with very little overhead, if any.
>
> OpenVZ in-kernel modifications can be divided into several components:
>
> 1. Virtualization and isolation.
> Many Linux kernel subsystems are virtualized, so each VPS has its own:
> - process tree (featuring virtualized pids, so that the init pid is 1);
> - filesystems (including virtualized /proc and /sys);
> - network (virtual network device, its own ip addresses,
> set of netfilter and routing rules);
> - devices (if needed, any VPS can be granted access to real devices
> like network interfaces, serial ports, disk partitions, etc);
> - IPC objects.
>
> 2. Resource Management.
> This subsystem enables multiple VPSs to coexist, providing managed
> resource sharing and limiting.
> - User Beancounters is a set of per-VPS resource counters, limits,
> and guarantees (kernel memory, network buffers, phys pages, etc.).
> - Fair CPU scheduler (SFQ with shares and hard limits).
> - Two-level disk quota (first-level: per-VPS quota;
> second-level: ordinary user/group quota inside a VPS)
>
> Resource management is what makes OpenVZ different from other solutions
> of this kind (like Linux VServer or FreeBSD jails). There are a few
> resources that can be abused from inside a VPS (such as files, IPC
> objects, ...) leading to a DoS attack. User Beancounters prevent such
> abuses.
>
> As virtualization solution OpenVZ makes it possible to do the same
> things for which people use UML, Xen, QEmu or VMware, but there are
> differences:
> (a) there is no ability to run other operating systems
> (although different Linux distros can happily coexist);
> (b) performance loss is negligible due to absense of any kind of
> emulation;
> (c) resource utilization is much better.
>
> The last point needs to be elaborated on. OpenVZ allows to utilize
> system resources such as memory and disk space very efficiently, and
> because of that has better performance on memory-critical workloads.
> OpenVZ does not run separate kernels in each VPS and saves memory on
> kernel internal data. However, even bigger efficiency of OpenVZ comes
> from dynamic resource allocation.
>
> With other virtualization solutions, you need to specify in advance the
> amount of memory for each virtual machine and create a disk device and
> filesystem for it, and the possibilities to change settings later on the
> fly are very limited.
>
> The dynamic assignment of resources in OpenVZ can significantly improve
> their utilization. For example, a x86_64 box (2.8 GHz Celeron D, 1GB
> RAM) is capable to run 100 VPSs with a fairly high performance (VPSs
> were serving http requests for 4.2Kb static pages at an overall rate of
> more than 80,000 req/min). Each VPS (running CentOS 4 x86_64) had the
> following set of processes:
>
> [root@ovz-x64 ~]# vzctl exec 1043 ps axf
> PID TTY STAT TIME COMMAND
> 1 ? Ss 0:00 init
> 11830 ? Ss 0:00 syslogd -m 0
> 11897 ? Ss 0:00 /usr/sbin/sshd
> 11943 ? Ss 0:00 xinetd -stayalive -pidfile ...
> 12218 ? Ss 0:00 sendmail: accepting connections
> 12265 ? Ss 0:00 sendmail: Queue runner@01:00:00
> 13362 ? Ss 0:00 /usr/sbin/httpd
> 13363 ? S 0:00 \_ /usr/sbin/httpd
> 13364 ? S 0:00 \_ /usr/sbin/httpd
> 13365 ? S 0:00 \_ /usr/sbin/httpd
> 13366 ? S 0:00 \_ /usr/sbin/httpd
> 13370 ? S 0:00 \_ /usr/sbin/httpd
> 13371 ? S 0:00 \_ /usr/sbin/httpd
> 13372 ? S 0:00 \_ /usr/sbin/httpd
> 13373 ? S 0:00 \_ /usr/sbin/httpd
> 6416 ? Rs 0:00 ps axf
>
> And the list of running VPSs:
>
> [root@ovz-x64 ~]# vzlist
> VPSID NPROC STATUS IP_ADDR HOSTNAME
> 1001 15 running 10.1.1.1 vps1001
> 1002 15 running 10.1.1.2 vps1002
> [....skipped....]
> 1099 15 running 10.1.1.99 vps1099
> 1100 15 running 10.1.1.100 vps1100
>
> On the box with 4Gb of RAM one can expect 400 of such VPSs to run
> without much troubles.
>
> More information is available at http://openvz.org/
>
> Thanks,
> OpenVZ team.
>
>
> -
> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
> the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
> More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
> Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

-
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
Please read the FAQ at http://www.tux.org/lkml/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2005-12-10 12:26    [W:0.073 / U:0.288 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site